Building A Fiberglass Boat / Edition 1

Building A Fiberglass Boat / Edition 1

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by Arthur Edmunds
     
 

Arthur Edmunds is one of the country's top naval architects and his knowledge of the boat building industry has never been more apparent than in this book.

Art has written this book so the reader, unfamiliar with the construction process, will understand every aspect of the process. But this is not a beginner's only boat building book. Advanced craftsmen and top

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Overview

Arthur Edmunds is one of the country's top naval architects and his knowledge of the boat building industry has never been more apparent than in this book.

Art has written this book so the reader, unfamiliar with the construction process, will understand every aspect of the process. But this is not a beginner's only boat building book. Advanced craftsmen and top professionals have equally as much to learn from Art's years of experience.

Art takes the reader from the first step of Building a Fiberglass Boat to the last step, in a manner that will certainly inspire all who ever pondered the notion. He expertly explains why a competent craftsman would want to undertake the, seemingly, overwhelming task of building their own boat.

Art has described the two most popular sizes and styles of boats as examples for the project; a twenty-five foot open boat and a thirty-three foot cruising boat. Sail is also explained, although there is little difference in the basic construction methods. By referring to these example boats, the reader can envision a boat of any size, limited only by the reader's imagination and wallet thickness.

Everyone can learn from this book. If you have a boat just waiting to be built, you will now have the knowledge. If you never plan to build a boat, you will understand the entire process, making the "Buying Experience" far less confusing.

There are no "Trade Secrets", only knowledge not yet learned. Illustrated.

From the Author

There are many people who read boating magazines or go with boat owners who need crew to accompany them for fishing or just for a relaxing afternoon cruise. These people are well informed about boats that are being sold and they go to boat shows to inquire about what is new on the market. Often these experienced people become boat owners by building their boat exactly as they want it. Many times they cannot find what they want from the many manufacturers. All it takes is time and energy and less of an investment when compared with boats from the dealers.

This book is written for those people who know what they want in a boat and have a great amount of satisfaction in their workmanship. Glass fiber hulls have become dominant in the boating world as the most desirable material. By far, the most important quality of glass fiber laminates is longevity. Boats built in 1950 are still being used with great success. That is why this book concentrates solely on this durable and popular material. Any conceivable shape can be made from glass fiber when laminating a custom hull. The building techniques are explained in these pages.

Glass fiber laminates are man made products that are a combination of the glass fiber filaments and a binder of resin. As such, the quality of the finished hull depends solely on the patience and skill of the person who builds it. The skill of laminating is very easily acquired with a little practice on some sample laminates. Like any other piece of workmanship, it is the careful attention to detail that results in a fine looking and long lasting boat. Boat building cannot be done in a quick and haphazard manner. Concentration and perseverance must be judiciously applied to obtain the boat of your lifetime.

As you read these pages, you will soon understand the many tasks and time involved in a boat building project. You may decide building your own boat is not a project you have the time to complete yourself. Even if this is your decision, you will have the knowledge to contract the project to a competent builder, confidant you will have the boat of your dreams when the project is complete.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781892216168
Publisher:
Bristol Fashion Publications
Publication date:
09/05/2000
Edition description:
Spiral
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
1,270,523
Product dimensions:
0.48(w) x 8.50(h) x 5.50(d)

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER ONE
WHY BUILD YOUR OWN BOAT?
Decide on the type of boat that fits your use
Have the satisfaction of building a custom boat
Selection of a building site
Costs comparison: manufactured and owner built
Selecting an engine for a desired speed
Buying a bare hull from a laminator
Drawings required
CHAPTER TWO
LOFTING & FRAMEWORK FOR THE MALE PLUG
Drawing the lines on the loft
Templates from the loft
Frames for the male plug
The deck to hull joint
CHAPTER THREE
LAMINATING THE HULL ON A MALE PLUG
Buying the glass material
Approximate amount of glass material required
Applying the glass
Sanding the hull
CHAPTER FOUR
TURNING THE HULL UPRIGHT
Building the cradle
Rotating the male plug
CHAPTER FIVE
BUILDING THE HULL IN A FEMALE MOLD
Conical developed hull lines are desirable
Frames for the female mold
Install longitudinal battens on the mold frames
Install the mold surface
Laminating the hull
CHAPTER SIX
INSTALLING THE BULKHEADS
Locating the bulkheads
Glassing the bulkheads on pads
Types of finishes for the bulkheads
CHAPTER SEVEN
INSTALLING THE CABIN SOLE
Floor supports Hatches for access to the bilges
CHAPTER EIGHT
TANKS
Do not use integral tanks
Tank location and materials
Tank thickness
CHAPTER NINE
THE ENGINEROOM
Engine girders
Installation of a sea chest for sea water intake
Watertight doors
The exhaust system
Propellers and shaft struts
Steering systems
Piping and wiring
CHAPTER TEN
BUILDING THE DECK
Deck beams
Deck material
Laminating the deck
CHAPTER ELEVEN
BUILDING WITHOUT DRAWINGS
Interior arrangements and the effects on trim Calculating to attain level trim
CHAPTER TWELVE
HATCHES, WINDOWS and VENTILATION
Hatch supports and drains
Building a window frame
Ventilation throughout the boat
Air supply to the engineroom
CHAPTER THIRTEEN
DECK HARDWARE
Anchors and anchor locker
Anchor windlass
Getting aboard the boat
Cleats and chocks
Navigation lights
CHAPTER FOURTEEN
ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
Approximate current requirements
Circuit breaker panels
CHAPTER FIFTEEN
INTERIOR JOINERWORK
Dimensions of berths and lockers
Building a model interior
Attachment to the hull
Building with glass fiber, aluminum or core materials
Types of finish for the hull, overhead and joinerwork
CHAPTER SIXTEEN
SAILBOATS
Building molds for a round bilge and compound curves
Chainplates
Mast steps and partners
Ballast with lead or with water tanks
Sails and cruising spinnakers
CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
FULL FLOTATION
Type and location of material
Calculating the amount of foam required
CHAPTER EIGHTEEN
STABILITY
Center of gravity
Heel angle of zero positive stability
Excessive rolling of the boat
Adding a keel
Adding angles to the bottom of the keel
CHAPTER NINETEEN
CATAMARANS
A wide deck and less rolling are prime assets
Minimum width between the hulls
Wider docking space required
Catamaran hull sectional shapes
Beams connecting the hulls
Catamaran construction
Catamaran interiors
CHAPTER TWENTY
EXTRA STRENGTH IN THE GLASS HULL
Keel thickness
Cracks due to collision
Deck house framing
Laminate at through hull fittings
CHAPTER TWENTY ONE
IMPORTANT CONSTRUCTION POINTS
A summary of construction details in the hull, deck, engineroom and joinerwork
APPENDIX ONE
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
APPENDIX TWO
OTHER HELPFUL BOOKS
APPENDIX THREE
SUPPLIERS & MANUFACTURES
APPENDIX FOUR
TOOLS & SUPPLIES
GLOSSARY
INDEX

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