Building Java Enterprise Systems with J2EE

Building Java Enterprise Systems with J2EE

by Paul Perrone, Venkata S.R.R. Chaganti, Chaganti Venkata S. R. Krishna R.
     
 

Building Java Enterprise Systems with J2EE provides a comprehensive and practical guide for professional Java developers and architects who need to build distributed, scalable, secure, and web-enabled Enterprise, E-commerce, and Business-to-Business (B2B) systems.

The practical angle of Building Java Enterprise Systems with J2EE provides the

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Overview

Building Java Enterprise Systems with J2EE provides a comprehensive and practical guide for professional Java developers and architects who need to build distributed, scalable, secure, and web-enabled Enterprise, E-commerce, and Business-to-Business (B2B) systems.

The practical angle of Building Java Enterprise Systems with J2EE provides the conceptual background and wealth of code examples needed to actually assemble systems in a useful manner with the J2EE technologies. Furthermore, this book demonstrates how the technologies complement and build on top of one another via evolution of a cohesive and real sample application. You can use this book to learn, develop, and design your custom applications immediately.

Topics covered include: J2EE, EJB, servlets, JSP, XML, JMS, JDBC, Security, JNDI, Jini, CORBA, RMI, DCOM, JTA, JTS, and JavaMail.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Software consultants Perrone and Chaganti present a solutions-oriented approach to creating and developing Java Enterprise systems with J2EE. Topics include understanding Enterprise, e-Commerce, and B2B system problems and solutions; building Enterprise components with J2EE and EJB; web-enabling Enterprise with J2EE, servlets, and JSP; representing data and deploying applications using XML; providing asynchronous messaging with JMS and JavaMail; supporting distributed object communications with CORBA, RMI, and DCOM; securing Enterprise with Web, Java, CORBA, and EJB security; and enabling Enterprise with JTA, JTS, OTS, JNDI, Jini, and JDBC 2.0. The included CD-ROM contains trial editions of BEA WebLogic Server 5.0.1, Inprise Visibroker for Java Orb, Prism Technologies OpenFusion CORBA Services, and source code and configuration scripts. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Internet Book Watch
The practical angle of Building Java Enterprise Systems With J2EE provides the conceptual background and wealth of code examples needed to actually assemble systems in a useful manner with the J2EE technologies. Furthermore, this book demonstrates how the technologies complement and build on top of one another via evolution of a cohesive and real sample application. You can use Building Java Enterprise Systems With J2EE to learn, develop, and design your custom applications immediately. Advanced/Expert, 1536 pages.
—Internet Book Watch
The practical angle of Building Java Enterprise Systems With J2EE provides the conceptual background and wealth of code examples needed to actually assemble systems in a useful manner with the J2EE technologies. Furthermore, Building Java Enterprise Systems With J2EE demonstrates how the technologies complement and build on top of one another via evolution of a cohesive and real sample application. You can use Building Java Enterprise Systems With J2EE to learn, develop, and design customized applications immediately. 1536 pages, Advanced/Expert

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780672317958
Publisher:
Sams
Publication date:
06/07/2000
Series:
Sams Professional Series
Edition description:
CD Rom Included
Pages:
1496
Product dimensions:
7.39(w) x 9.08(h) x 2.44(d)

Read an Excerpt


Chapter 1: Enterprise Architectural Overview

This chapter provides an overview of the assumed boundaries of an enterprise as it is scoped by this book, its components, the relation between components, and the vision for how information technology can streamline the operations of an enterprise. In particular, we describe how the use of Java enterprise technology with the J2EE platform can help solve enterprise computing problems in a cohesive and comprehensive fashion.

In this chapter, you will learn:

  • The definition of an enterprise as used in this book, the components of an enterprise, and how these components are related.
  • The fundamental components of an enterprise system as they relate to needs driven by the goals and objectives of an enterprise.
  • How information technology is utilized by and energizes the enterprise.
  • How Java enterprise technologies provide a fully "caffeinated" enterprise, helping it to accomplish all its goals and objectives.

The Enterprise

In its most generic form, the term enterprise can simply refer to an organization that has set out to accomplish certain goals. The organization may be a small-, medium-, or large-scale commercial corporation; a nonprofit institution; or perhaps a government organization. In some contexts, including the context of this book, the term enterprise is typically used to refer to a large organization. It is usually assumed that enterprises have a desire to grow and expand their operations and human/inter-enterprise associations over time. It is also often assumed that pursuit of the enterprise's goals are essential both for survival of the enterprise and for the growth of the enterprise.

Figure 1. I depicts the main components of an enterprise that are used to help the enterprise accomplish its goals. Physical resources and assets are one component of an enterprise utilized to accomplish enterprise goals. For example, computing equipment, manufacturing facilities, product supplies, and corporate accounts are all examples of resources and assets that are essential to the operations of an enterprise. People and users are another fundamental component of an enterprise, with customers, employees, contractors, and partners (with other enterprises) forming the core of those classes of people who help the enterprise accomplish its goals. Finally, enterprise information and enterprise knowledge are also key ingredients used to help further the goals of an enterprise.

Because the various enterprise components help an enterprise accomplish its goals, they offer some value to the enterprise. It is in the best interest of an enterprise to preserve, protect, grow, make accessible, make efficient, and be sensitive to change in the value offered by the various enterprise components. These interests and primary objectives of an enterprise are to foster such desirable outcomes as these:

  • Growth of a customer base
  • Preservation of a customer base
  • Sensitivity to a changing customer base
  • Growth of an employee base
  • Efficiency of an employee base
  • Growth of a partnership base
  • Growth of resources/assets
  • Preservation of resources/assets
  • Protection of resources/assets
  • Accessibility of resources/assets
  • Sensitivity to a change in resources/assets
  • Growth of information and business knowledge
  • Preservation of information and business knowledge
  • Protection of information and business knowledge
  • Accessibility of information and business knowledge
  • Sensitivity to changes in information and knowledge

Enterprise Components

Given those components of an enterprise that have some value to the enterprise and the pursuit of an enterprise's interest in these valued components, Figure 1.2 presents the type of system a modern enterprise will strive to incorporate into its operations to maximize its goals. An enterprise generally attempts to develop the following example features shown in Figure 1.2 given the interests it has in striving to achieve its goals:

  • Growth of a customer base can lead an enterprise to provide Internet/Web connectivity perhaps in the form of a Business-to-Commerce (B2C) or E-commerce application to open up the opportunity for more customers to patronize the enterprise. Furthermore, a growing customer base will also require the provision of a scalable Web and application connectivity solution.
  • Preservation of a customer base may be accomplished by streamlining connectivity to legacy distribution supply chains so that customer satisfaction remains high due to the speed with which an enterprise can satisfy customers' orders.
  • Sensitivity to a changing customer base can also be facilitated via a tailored presentation interface for different Web-based customers depending on customer profiles persisted in an enterprise database.
  • Growth of an employee base can be managed by a streamlined and scalable human resources Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) application.
  • Efficiency of an employee base can be offered via direct connection to enterprise applications through a distributed enterprise client application over an intranet.
  • Growth of a partnership base can be managed via the establishment of secure Businessto-Business (13213) application logic and transaction handling.
  • Growth and preservation of resources/assets can be managed and provided via Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) with legacy applications, distributed enterprise applications, and connectivity to embedded resources.

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Meet the Author


Paul J. Perrone is the Founder, the President, and a Senior Software Consultant for Assured Technologies, Inc. Through Assured Technologies (http: / /www. assuredtech. com), Paul provides software consulting, training, products, and research for companies interested in economical, scalable, secure, and Internet-enabled distributed enterprise systems used for e-commerce, business-to-business (13213) transactions, and general enterprise-wide application. Paul has enabled his specialized background in high-intelligence and high-assurance (for example, security) systems to be reflected in Assured Technologies's business practice and pursuits. Paul has been a key player in the architecture, design, and development of numerous large-scale n-tier distributed systems and products for both Fortune 500 and medium-sized organizations. Paul's key technology and training expertise areas are enterprise Java and the J2EE, Enterprise JavaBeans, embedded-enterprise system connectivity, CORBA, XML, UML, and objectoriented/component-based software. In addition to this book, Paul publishes his work in various trade journals. He has an MSEE from the University of Virginia and a BSEE from Rutgers University. He is a member of the IEEE and ACM and has served as chapter chair for the Northern Virginia IEEE Computer Society. Paul can be reached at pperrone@assuredtech.com or (703) 728-01 15.

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