Building Robot Drive Trains

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Overview

This essential title in McGraw-Hill’s ROBOT DNA SERIES is just what robotics hobbyists need to build an effective drive train using inexpensive, off-the-shelf parts. Leaving heavy-duty “tech speak” behind, the authors focus on the actual concepts and applications necessary to build – and understand — these critical force-conveying systems.

If you’re hooked on amateur robotics and want a clear, straight-forward...

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Overview

This essential title in McGraw-Hill’s ROBOT DNA SERIES is just what robotics hobbyists need to build an effective drive train using inexpensive, off-the-shelf parts. Leaving heavy-duty “tech speak” behind, the authors focus on the actual concepts and applications necessary to build – and understand — these critical force-conveying systems.

If you’re hooked on amateur robotics and want a clear, straight-forward guide to the nuts-and-bolts of drive trains, this is the way to go.

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO BUILD YOUR OWN ROBOT DRIVE TRAIN:
* The Basics of Robot Locomotion
* Motor Types: An Overview
* Using DC Motors
* Using RC Servo Motors
* Using Stepper Motors
* Motor Mounting
* Motor Control
* Electronics Interfacing
* Wheels and Treads
* Locomotion for Multipods
* Glossary of Terms/Tables, Formulas

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Motion is where it's at in the robot world. In fact, the authors of this book claim that if it doesn't move, it isn't a robot. Dennis Clark and Michael Owings deliver all the goods on locomotion -- the capability of a robot to move from place to place. Best of all, they make it fun to learn and instill confidence in the novice.

Building Robot Drive Trains has been logically planned out and very well executed. The authors begin with locomotion (motor) basics and proceed in a well mapped out approach. Chapter 2 delivers an overview of the direct current (DC) motor, Hobby servo, and Stepper motor, including sizing information for specific power needs. This serves as the basic requirement needed to prepare the reader for the specific details on each of the motor types provided in Chapters 3, 4, and 5, respectively.

Next, the authors convey a wealth of information on mounting techniques, controlling motors, electrical wiring, and micro controller interfacing. They also cover some electronics, such as H-bridges (an H pattern formed by the transistors and the motor) and motor drive chips circuits; motor control programming; and, proportional integral differential (PID) loops. Finally, the authors tackle the details of using wheels, treads, tank tracks, multipods, and legs powered by variants of the standard electric motor.

Whether you're inexperienced or a mechanical wiz, this book is recommended reading for anyone interested in robot building. The authors' first-rate presentation of the use of motors can only enhance your expertise, and there's no doubt that Building Robot Drive Trains delivers a real "mobile" experience. John Vacca

John Vacca, the former computer security official (CSO) for NASA's space station program (Freedom), has written 38 books about advanced storage, computer security, and aerospace technology.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780071408509
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing
  • Publication date: 9/11/2002
  • Series: Robot DNA Ser.
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 965,853
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Dennis Clark has degrees in electrical engineering technology and computer science and is a graduate student in behavioral robotics at Colorado State University. Mr. Clark has authored a series of articles on behavioral robotics for the European hobbyist magazine Elektor.

Michael Owings is a freelance software developer. He lives and works in southern Louisiana.

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Table of Contents

Introduction
Ch. 1 The Basics of Robot Locomotion 1
Ch. 2 Motor Types: An Overview 25
Ch. 3 Using DC Motors 55
Ch. 4 Using RC Servo Motors 113
Ch. 5 Using Stepper Motors 141
Ch. 6 Mounting Motors 173
Ch. 7 Motor Control 101, The Basics 189
Ch. 8 Motor Control 201 - Closing the Loop with Feedback 225
Ch. 9 Electronics and Microcontroller Interfacing 285
Ch. 10 Wheels and Tank Tracks 303
Ch. 11 Locomotion for Multipods 333
App. A: Glossary 365
App. B: Tables, Formulae, and Constants 371
App. C: Resources 377
Index 391
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2010

    good read

    A great reference for developing drive trains

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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