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Building Scalable Cisco Networks

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Prepare for CCNP or CCDP certification with the official BSCN Coursebook

  • Understand the principles of classful and classless routing and the difference between link-state and distance vector protocol behavior
  • Select and configure the appropriate services for simplifying IP address management at branch offices by proper address allocation and summarization
  • Implement the ...
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Overview

Prepare for CCNP or CCDP certification with the official BSCN Coursebook

  • Understand the principles of classful and classless routing and the difference between link-state and distance vector protocol behavior
  • Select and configure the appropriate services for simplifying IP address management at branch offices by proper address allocation and summarization
  • Implement the appropriate technologies for a scalable, routed network that uses link-state protocols and redistribution
  • Configure edge routers to properly interconnect to a BGP network through either a single or multihomed interconnection
  • Control and optimize routing update information by implementing filters, metrics, and policy-based routing and changing administrative distance
  • Examine case studies that show you how to build a scalable internetwork including multiple routing protocols


Based on the new BSCN instructor-led course developed by Cisco Systems, Building Scalable Cisco Networks teaches you how to design, configure, maintain, and scale routed networks that are growing in size and complexity. This book focuses on using Cisco routers connected in LANs and WANs typically found at medium to large network sites. Upon completion of this book, you will be able to select and implement the appropriate Cisco IOS(r) Software services required to build scalable, routed networks.

As the replacement for the Advanced Cisco Router Configuration (ACRC) course, BSCN is one of four new courses recommended by Cisco for Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) and Cisco Certified Design Professional (CCDP) preparation.

In Building Scalable Cisco Networks you willstudy a broad range of technical details on topics related to routing, including routing principles, IP addressing issues such as variable-length subnet masks (VLSMs), route summarization, and protocol redistribution. The routing protocols Open Shortest Path First (OSPF), Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP), and Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) are investigated in detail. Configuration examples and sample verification output demonstrate troubleshooting techniques, and a case study is used throughout the book to review key concepts and to discuss critical issues surrounding network operation. Chapter-ending configuration exercises and review questions illustrate and help solidify the concepts presented in the book.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Three things are certain: death, taxes, and rapid growth in network traffic. Catherine Paquet and Diane Teare can't help with the first two. But network scalability? That they've got nailed.

In this book, Paquet and Teare -- both senior network architects at Cisco's largest worldwide training partner -- cover internetworking scalability from start to finish. From high-level principles to protocols to specific IOS commands, Building Scalable Cisco Networks guides you through both planning and implementation.

You'll begin by learning how to extend the use of limited IP address resources via VLSMs (and, if possible, route summarization). Next, the authors review each of Cisco's key scalable routing protocols, OSPF, EIGRP, and BGP. They outline the scalability limitations of internal BGP, and demonstrate how to overcome them with route reflectors -- presenting practical migration tips, good designs, and bad designs to avoid.

There's a full chapter on using route redistribution to interconnect networks using multiple routing protocols. You'll also find practical job aids for addressing, access lists, route optimization, and password recovery, as well as summaries of relevant router commands.

We've focused on the book's day-to-day value in the field, but Building Scalable Cisco Networks is also Cisco's official course guide for the BSCN (Routing) exam that's on your path to CCNP or CCDP certification. To that end, it's full of review questions and detailed configuration exercises -- with even more detailed solutions.

Birds gotta fly, networks gotta scale -- and if you've got to make them scale, you won't find a more useful book. (Bill Camarda) (Bill Camarda)

Bill Camarda is a consultant and writer with nearly 20 years' experience in helping technology companies deploy and market advanced software, computing, and networking products and services. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks For Dummies®, Second Edition.

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Product Details

Meet the Author


Catherine Paquet is a Senior Network Architect with Global Knowledge Network (Canada), Inc., Cisco's largest worldwide training partner. There, she provides consulting and training services to customers in North America and Europe. She was also a member of the team at Cisco Systems that developed the Building Scalable Cisco Networks (BSCN) instructor-led course.

Catherine has in-depth knowledge of routing technologies and access services, mainly in the area of Frame Relay, ISDN, and asynchronous connections. Catherine's internetworking career started as a LAN manager; she was promoted to MAN manager and eventually became the nationwide WAN manager for a federal department. She currently is the course director/master instructor for the Building Cisco Remote Access Networks (BCRAN) and Managing Cisco Network Security (MCNS) courses at Global Knowledge Network (Canada) Inc. She has a master's degree in business administration, with a major in management information systems. Catherine edited Building Cisco Remote Access Networks and co-authored Building Scalable Cisco Networks, both from Cisco Press.

Diane Teare is a Senior Network Architect with Global Knowledge Network (Canada), Inc., Cisco's largest worldwide training partner. There, she provides consulting and training services to customers in North America and Europe. She was also a member of the team at Cisco Systems that developed the Building Scalable Cisco Networks (BSCN) instructor-led course.

Diane has more than 15 years of experience in design, implementation, and troubleshooting of network hardware and software. She also has been involved in teaching, course design, and projectmanagement. Diane is the course director/master instructor for the BSCN and Designing Cisco Networks (DCN) courses at Global Knowledge Network (Canada) Inc. She is a CCSI, CCDA, and CCNP, and has authored and edited networking books and articles. Diane has a bachelor's degree in applied science in electrical engineering and a master's degree in applied science in management science. She edited Designing Cisco Networks and co-authored Building Scalable Cisco Networks, both from Cisco Press.

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Read an Excerpt


1. Routing Principles

This chapter covers the principles of routing. Classful and classless routing are reviewed, as are the differences between distance vector and link-state routing protocol behavior. Convergence issues surrounding the most commonly used interior routing protocols for the Internet Protocol (IP) are also presented.

After reading this chapter, you will be able to list the key information routers need to route data, describe classful and classless routing protocols, compare distance vector and linkstate protocol operation, and describe the use of the fields in a routing table. Finally, given a preconfigured network, you should be able to discover the topology, analyze the routing table, and test connectivity using accepted troubleshooting techniques.

Routing Fundamentals

This section reviews routing in general, the requirements for routing, and how routing decisions are made, including the use of administrative distance and metrics.

Routing Defined

Routing is a relay process in which items are forwarded from one location to another. In computer networks, user-generated traffic-such as electronic mail or graphic and text documents-is forwarded from a logical source to a logical destination. Each device in the network has a logical address so that it can be reached individually; in some cases, devices can also be reached as part of a larger group of devices.

For a muter to act as an effective relay device, it must have knowledge of the logical topology of the network and be capable of communicating with its neighboring devices. A router can be configured to recognize several different logical addressing schemes and to regularly exchange topology information with other devices in the network.

The mechanism of learning and maintaining awareness of the network topology is considered to be the routing function. The actual movement of transient traffic through the muter, from an inbound interface to an outbound interface, is a separate function and is considered to be the switching function. A routing device must perform both the routing and the switching functions to be an effective relay device.

NOTE: Appendix E, "Open System Interconnection (OSI) Reference Model," contains a review of the Open System Interconnection (OSI) reference model. Under this reference model, a router is an OSI Layer 3 device that has an understanding of the logical topology of the network. The routing and switching functions described here refer to the forwarding of a Layer 3 protocol data unit (PDU), also referred to as a packet (or datagram). A packet contains a logical source and a logical destination address that the routing device interprets during the packet forwarding process.

Routing Requirements

A router must know three items in order to route:

  • The router must determine whether it has the protocol suite active.
  • The router must know the destination network.
  • The router must know which outbound interface is the best path to the destination.

For a routing device to make a routing decision, it must first understand the logical destination address. For this to happen, the protocol suite that uses that logical addressing scheme must be enabled and currently active on the router. Some examples of common protocol suites are Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), Internetwork Packet Exchange (IPX), and Digital Equipment Corporation's DECnet.

After the router can understand the addressing scheme, the second decision is to determine whether the destination logical network is a valid destination within the current routing table. If the destination logical network does not exist in the routing table, routing devices might be programmed to discard the packet and to generate an error message (for example, an IP Internet Control Message Protocol [ICMP] message) to notify the sender of the event. Some network managers have successfully reduced the size of their network's routing tables by including only a few destination networks and then specifying a default route entry. If specified, a default route will be followed if the destination logical network is not included as part of the device's routing table.

The final decision that the routing device must make if the destination network is in the routing table is to determine through which outbound interface the packet will be forwarded. The routing table will contain only the best path (or paths) to any given destination logical network. The best path to a destination network will be associated with a particular outbound interface by the routing protocol process. Routing protocols use a metric to determine the best path to a destination. A smaller metric indicates a preferred path; if two or more paths have an equal lowest metric, then all those paths will be equally shared. Sharing packet traffic across multiple paths is referred to as load balancing to the destination. When the outbound interface is known, the router must also have an encapsulation method (in other words, a Layer 2 frame type) to use when forwarding the packet to the next-hop logical device in the relay path.

Routing Information

The information required to perform the routing operation is included in the router's routing table and is generated by one or more routing protocol processes. The routing table is composed of multiple entries, each of which indicates the following:

  • The mechanism by which the route was learned. Learning methods can be either dynamic or manual.
  • The logical destination, either a major network or a subnetwork (also called a subnet) of a major network. In isolated cases, host addresses may be contained in the routing table.
  • The administrative distance, which is a measure of the trustworthiness of the learning mechanism. Administrative distance is discussed further in the next section, "Administrative Distance."
  • The metric, which is a measure of the aggregate path "cost," as defined by the routing protocol. Routing metrics are discussed further in the section "Routing Metric," later in this chapter.
  • The address of the next-hop relay device (router) in the path to the destination.
  • How current the information about the route is. This field indicates the amount of time the information has been in the routing table since the last update. Depending on the routing protocol in use, route entry information may be refreshed periodically to ensure that it is current.
  • The interface associated with reaching the destination network. This is the port through which the packet will leave the router and be forwarded to the next-hop relay device.

Administrative Distance

The routing process is responsible for selecting the best path to any destination network. Because more than one learning mechanism can exist on a router at any given time, a method to choose between routes is needed when the same route is learned from multiple sources. For IP within a Cisco router, the concept of an administrative distance is used as a selection method for IP routing protocols.

Administrative distance is used as a measure of the trustworthiness of the source of the IP routing information. It is important only when a router learns about a destination route from more than one source.

Lower values of administrative distance are preferred over higher values. In general, default administrative distances have been assigned with a preference for manual entries over dynamically learned entries, and routing protocols with more sophisticated metrics over routing protocols with simple metrics. A comparison chart of the default administrative distances is presented in Table 1-2...

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Table of Contents

I. SCALABLE INTERNETWORKS.

1. Routing Principles.
Routing Fundamentals.
Routing Defined. Routing Requirements. Routing Information.
Administrative Distance. Routing Metric. Neighbor Relationships. Routing Protocols.
Classful Routing Overview. Classless Routing Overview.
Distance Vector Operation. Link-State Operation. Convergence. Routing Table Analysis. Introduction to the Case Study. Summary. Configuration Exercise: Discovering the Network.
Objectives. Visual Objective. Command List. Setup. Task: Basic Router Setup. Completion Criteria.
Answers to Configuration Exercise: Discovering the Network. Answers to Task: Basic Router Setup. Review Questions.

2. Extending IP Addresses.
Current Challenges in IP Addressing.
IP Addressing Solutions. IP Addressing and Subnetting. Hierarchical Addressing. Planning an IP Address Hierarchy. Benefits of Hierarchical Addressing.
Variable-Length Subnet Masks. VLSM Overview.
Calculating VLSMs. A Working VLSM Example.
Route Summarization.
Route Summarization Overview. Summarizing Within an Octet. Summarizing Addresses in a VLSM-Designed Network. Route Summarization Implementation. Route Summarization Operation in Cisco Routers. Summarizing Routes in a Discontinuous Network. Route Summarization Summary.
Classless Interdomain Routing. CIDR Example. Using IP Unnumbered Serial Interfaces.
Using Helper Addresses. Server Location. IP Helper Address Configuration. IP Helper Address Examples.
Summary. ReviewQuestions.

II. SCALABLE ROUTING PROTOCOLS.

3. Configuring OSPF in a Single Area.
OSPF Overview.
OSPF Terminology. OSPF Operation in a Broadcast Multi-access Topology. Designated Router and Backup Designated Router. OSPF Startup. Choosing Routes. Maintaining Routing Information. OSPF Operation in a Point-to-Point Topology. OSPF Operation in an NBMA Topology. OSPF over NBMA Topology├│Modes of Operation. NBMA Mode Neighborship.
Configuring OSPF in a Single Area.
Optional OSPF Configuration Commands.
Configuring OSPF over NBMA Topology.
Verifying OSPF Operation.
Case Study: OSPF in a Single Area.
Case Study Solution.
Summary. Configuration Exercise #1: Configuring OSPF for a Single Area.
Objectives. Visual Objective. Command List. Task 1: Enabling OSPF Within Your Pod. Task 2: Enabling OSPF Connectivity to the backbone_r1 Router. Bonus Task. Completion Criteria.
Configuration Exercise #2: Configuring OSPF for a Single Area in an NBMA Environment.
Objectives. Visual Objective. Command List. Setup. Task 1: Creating the Frame Relay Switch. Task 2: Enabling OSPF over NBMA Network Using Main Interface. Bonus Task. Task 3: Enabling OSPF over NBMA Network Using Point-to-Point Subinterface. Completion Criteria.
Answers to Configuration Exercise #1: Configuring OSPF for a Single Area.
Answers to Task 1: Enabling OSPF Within Your Pod. Answers to Task 2: Enabling OSPF Connectivity to the backbone_r1 Router. Bonus Task.
Answers to Configuration Exercise #2: Configuring OSPF for a Single Area in an NBMA Environment.
Answers to Setup. Answers to Task 1: Creating the Frame Relay Switch. Answers to Task 2: Enabling OSPF over NBMA Network Using Main Interface. Answers to Bonus Task. Answers to Task 3: Enabling OSPF over NBMA Network Using Point-to-Point Subinterface.
Review Questions.

4. Interconnecting Multiple OSPF Areas.
Multiple OSPF Areas. Types of Routers. Types of Link-State Advertisements. Types of Areas.
OSPF Operation Across Multiple Areas. Flooding LSUs in Multiple Areas.
Virtual Links Overview. Using and Configuring OSPF Multiarea Components. Using Stub and Totally Stubby Areas.
Multiple-Area NBMA Environment. Supporting Route Summarization. Configuring Virtual Links.
Verifying OSPF Operation.
Case Study: OSPF Multiarea. Case Study Solution.
Summary. Configuration Exercise: Configuring a Multiarea OSPF Network.
Objectives. Visual Objective. Command List. Setup. Task 1: Enabling OSPF with Multiple Areas and Area Summarization. Task 2: Enabling OSPF Stub Area. Task 3: Enabling OSPF Totally Stubby Area. Task 4: Enabling OSPF Not-So-Stubby Area (Optional). Bonus Questions. Task 5: Enabling OSPF Virtual Link to Support an OSPF Area Not Connected to Area 0 (Optional). Completion Criteria.
Answers to Configuration Exercise: Configuring a Multiarea OSPF Network.
Answers to Setup. Answers to Task 1: Enabling OSPF with Multiple Areas and Area Summarization. Answers to Task 2: Enabling OSPF Stub Area. Answers to Task 3: Enabling OSPF Totally Stubby Area. Answers to Task 4: Enabling OSPF Not-So-Stubby Area (Optional). Answers to Bonus Questions. Answers to Task 5: Enabling OSPF Virtual Link to Support an OSPF Area Not Connected to Area 0 (Optional).
Review Questions.

5. Configuring EIGRP.
EIGRP Overview.
Advantages of EIGRP. EIGRP Terminology. EIGRP Operation. EIGRP Packets. EIGRP Neighbor Relationship. Configuring EIGRP. Steps for Configuring EIGRP.
Route Summarization. EIGRP Load Balancing. EIGRP and WAN Links.
Using EIGRP in a Scalable Internetwork.
Verifying EIGRP Operation. Case Study: EIGRP. Case Study Solution. Summary. Configuration Exercise #1: Configuring EIGRP.
Objectives. Visual Objective. Command List. Setup. Task 1: Enabling EIGRP Within Your Pod. Task 2: Enabling EIGRP Connectivity to the backbone_r1 Router. Completion Criteria.
Configuration Exercise #2: Configuring EIGRP in an NBMA Environment.
Objectives. Visual Objective. Command List. Setup. Task 1: Creating a Frame Relay Switch. Task 2: Enabling EIGRP over NBMA Network Using Main Interface. Completion Criteria.
Answers to Configuration Exercise #1: Configuring EIGRP.
Answers to Setup. Answers to Task 1: Enabling EIGRP Within Your Pod. Answers to Task 2: Enabling EIGRP Connectivity to the backbone_r1 Router.
Answers to Configuration Exercise #2: Configuring EIGRP in an NBMA Environment.
Answers to Setup. Answers to Task 1: Creating a Frame Relay Switch. Answers to Task 2: Enabling EIGRP over NBMA Network Using Main Interface.
Review Questions.

6. Configuring Basic Border Gateway Protocol.
BGP Overview. Autonomous Systems. BGP Use.
Comparison with Other Scalable Routing Protocols. When to Use BGP. How Big Is the Internet? When Not to Use BGP.
Static Routes.
BGP Terminology and Concepts. BGP Characteristics. BGP Inside IP Packets. BGP Tables. BGP Peers or Neighbors.
Policy-Based Routing.
BGP Attributes. BGP Operation. BGP Message Types.
Route Selection Decision Process. CIDR and Aggregate Addresses. Configuring BGP. Peer Groups. Basic BGP Commands.
Basic BGP Commands Example.
Changing the Next-Hop Attribute. Disabling BGP Synchronization. Creating a Summary Address in the BGP Table. Resetting BGP. Another BGP Example. Verifying BGP.
show ip bgp Command Output Example. show ip bgp summary Command Output Example. show ip bgp neighbors Command Output Example. debug ip bgp updates Command Output Example.
Summary. Configuration Exercise: Configuring BGP.
Objectives. Visual Objective. Command List. Setup. Task 1: Enabling EBGP. Task 2: Enabling Full-Mesh IBGP Within Your Pod (AS). Bonus Questions. Completion Criteria.
Answers to Configuration Exercise: Configuring BGP.
Answers to Setup. Answers to Task 1: Enabling EBGP. Answers to Task 2: Enabling Full-Mesh IBGP Within Your Pod (AS). Answers to Bonus Questions. Review Questions.

7. Implementing BGP in Scalable Networks.
Scalability Problems with IBGP. BGP Split Horizon. Route Reflectors.
Route Reflector Benefits. Route Reflector Terminology. Route Reflector Design. Route Reflector Design Example. Route Reflector Operation. Route Reflector Migration Tips. Route Reflector Configuration. Route Reflector Example. Verifying Route Reflectors.
Policy Control and Prefix Lists. Prefix List Characteristics.
Filtering with Prefix Lists. Configuring Prefix Lists. Prefix List Sequence Numbers. Prefix List Example. Verifying Prefix Lists. Verifying Prefix Lists Example.
Multihoming. Types of Multihoming.
Default Routes from All Providers. Customer and Default Routes from All Providers. Full Routes from All Providers. Configuring Weight and Local Preference. Multihoming Examples.
Redistribution with IGPs.
Advertising Networks into BGP. Advertising from BGP into an IGP. Case Study: Multihomed BGP. Case Study Solution.
Summary. Configuration Exercise #1: Configuring BGP Route Reflectors and Prefix List Filtering.
Objectives. Visual Objective. Command List. Setup. Task 1: Enabling pxr1 to Be the Route Reflector. Task 2: Enabling an Inbound Prefix List. Completion Criteria.
Configuration Exercise #2: Configuring Multihomed BGP.
Objectives. Visual Objective. Command List. Task: Enabling a Second EBGP Connection. Completion Criteria.
Answers to Configuration Exercise #1: Configuring BGP Route Reflectors and Prefix List Filtering. Answers to Setup. Answers to Task 1: Enabling pxr1 to Be the Route Reflector. Answers to Task 2: Enabling an Inbound Prefix List. Answers to Configuration Exercise #2: Configuring Multihomed BGP. Answers to Task: Enabling a Second EBGP Connection. Review Questions.

II. CONTROLLING SCALABLE INTERNETWORKS.

8. Optimizing Routing Update Operation.
Redistribution Among Multiple Routing Protocols. What Is Redistribution? Redistribution Considerations.
Configuring Redistribution. Redistributing into OSPF. Redistributing into EIGRP.
Defining the Default Metric. Configuring Redistribution into Edge Protocol. The passive-interface Command. Static and Default Routes. Controlling Routing Update Traffic. Using Route Filters. Modifying Administrative Distance. Redistribution Example Using the distance Command. Verifying Redistribution Operation.
Policy-Based Routing Using Route Maps. Policy-Based Routing. Configuring Policy-Based Routing. Policy-Based Routing Example. Verifying Policy-Based Routing. Case Study: Redistribution. Case Study Solution.
Summary. Configuration Exercise #1: Configuring Policy-Based Routing.
Objectives. Visual Objective. Command List. Setup. Task: Enable IP Policy-Based Routing at pxr1. Completion Criteria.
Configuration Exercise #2: Configuring Route Redistribution Between OSPF and EIGRP.
Objectives. Visual Objective. Command List. Setup. Task 1: Enable OSPF Between pxr1 (S0 and S1) and pxr2 (S0 and S1). Task 2: Enable EIGRP Between pxr1 (S2) and pxr3 (S0). Task 3: Enable Route Redistribution Between OSPF and EIGRP. Task 4: Enable Route Redistribution from EIGRP to OSPF with Filtering. Bonus Task. Completion Criteria.
Configuration Exercise #1 Answers: Configuring Policy-Based Routing. Answers to Setup. Answers to Task: Enable IP Policy-Based Routing at pxr1. Configuration Exercise #2 Answers: Configuring Route Redistribution Between OSPF and EIGRP. Answers to Setup. Answers to Task 1: Enable OSPF Between pxr1 (S0 and S1) and pxr2 (S0 and S1). Answers to Task 2: Enable EIGRP Between pxr1 (S2) and pxr3 (S0). Answers to Task 3: Enable Route Redistribution Between OSPF and EIGRP. Answers to Task 4: Enable Route Redistribution from EIGRP to OSPF with Filtering. Answers to Bonus Task. Review Questions.

9. IMPLEMENTING SCALABILITY FEATURES IN YOUR INTERNETWORK.
Routing Principles.
Routing Defined. Classful Routing. Classless Routing.
Extending IP Addressing Space. IP Addressing Solutions. VLSM Overview. Route Summarization Overview. CIDR Overview. Connecting to ISPs. Autonomous Systems. BGP Characteristics.
BGP Route Selection Decision Process. BGP Multihoming.
Controlling Routing Updates and Policies. Route Filters with Distribute Lists. Route Maps. Policy-Based Routing. BGP Policy Control. Route Redistribution.
When to Use Multiple Routing Protocols.
Redistribution Overview.
Redistribution Implementation Guidelines. Case Study: Summary. Case Study Solution.
Summary. Configuration Exercise: Super Lab, Part I.
Objectives. Visual Objective. Command List. Setup. Task: Super Lab, Part I, Configuration. Completion Criteria.
Configuration Exercise: Super Lab, Part II.
Objectives. Visual Objective. Command List. Setup. Task: Super Lab, Part II, Configuration. Completion Criteria.
Answers to Configuration Exercise: Super Lab, Part I.
Answers to Setup. Answers to Task: Super Lab, Part I, Configuration.
Answers to Configuration Exercise: Super Lab, Part II. Answers to Task: Super Lab, Part II, Configuration. Review Questions.

III. APPENDIXES.

Appendix A: Job Aids and Supplements.
Extending IP Addressing Job Aids. IP Addresses and Subnetting. Decimal-to-Binary Conversion Chart.
Supplement 1: Addressing Review.
Converting IP Addresses Between Decimal and Binary. Determining an IP Address Class. Extending an IP Classful Address Using Subnet Masks.
Calculating a Subnet Mask. Calculating the Networks for a Subnet Mask. Using Prefixes to Represent a Subnet Mask. Supplement 1 Review Questions. Supplement 2: IP Access Lists.
IP Access List Overview. IP Standard Access Lists. IP Extended Access Lists. Restricting Virtual Terminal Access. Verifying Access List Configuration.
Supplement 2 Review Questions. Supplement 3: OSPF.
OSPF Not-So-Stubby Areas. OSPF Single-Area Configuration Example. OSPF Multiarea Configuration Example.
Supplement 4: EIGRP. IPX and EIGRP. AppleTalk and EIGRP. EIGRP Configuration Examples. Supplement 5: BGP.
BGP Configuration Output Examples.
Distribute Lists. Route Maps. Communities. Peer Groups. Supplement 6: Route Optimization
Examples of Redistribution in a Nonredundant Configuration. Miscellaneous Redistribution Configuration Examples.

Appendix B: Router Password Recovery Procedure.
Appendix C: Summary of ICND Router Commands.
General Commands. Comparison of Configuration File Commands. General Configuration Commands. General Interface Configuration Commands. General IP Commands. IP Configuration Commands. General IPX Commands. IPX Configuration Commands. General AppleTalk Commands. AppleTalk Configuration Commands. General WAN Commands. WAN Configuration Commands.

Appendix D: Summary of BSCN Router Commands.
General Commands. Comparison of Configuration File Commands. General Configuration Commands. General Interface Configuration Commands. General IP Commands. IP Configuration Commands. General WAN Commands. WAN Configuration Commands.

Appendix E: Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Reference Model.
Characteristics of the OSI Layers. Protocols. OSI Model and Communication Between Systems. Interaction Between OSI Model Layers. OSI Layer Services.
OSI Model Layers and Information Exchange. OSI Model Physical Layer. OSI Model Data Link Layer. OSI Model Network Layer. OSI Model Transport Layer. OSI Model Session Layer. OSI Model Presentation Layer. OSI Model Application Layer. Information Formats.

Appendix F: Common Requests For Comments.
Appendix G: Answers to the Review Questions.
Chapter 1. Chapter 2. Chapter 3. Chapter 4. Chapter 5. Chapter 6. Chapter 7. Chapter 8. Chapter 9.

Appendix H.
Supplement 1 Review Questions. Supplement 2 Review Questions.

Appendix I: Configuration Exercise Equipment Requirements and Backbone Configurations.
Configuration Exercise Equipment Requirements. Configuration Exercise Setup Diagram. Configuration Exercise Equipment Wiring. Backbone Router Configuration.
Backbone_r1 Configurations. Backbone_r2 Configurations.

Appendix J: Glossary.
Appendix K: Index.
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Foreword

In April 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc., announced a new professional development initiative called the Cisco Career Certifications. These certifications address the growing worldwide demand for more (and better) trained computer networking experts. Building upon our highly successful Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE) program-the industry's most respected networking certification vehicle-Cisco Career Certifications enable you to be certified at various technical proficiency levels.

Building Scalable Cisco Networks presents in book format all the topics covered in the challenging instructor-led and e-learning certification preparation courses of the same name. The BSCN courses replace the Advanced Cisco Router Configuration 11.3 course. As such, BSCN addresses those tasks that network engineers need to perform when managing access and controlling overhead traffic in growing, routed networks after basic connectivity has been established. This is one of four recommended training courses for CCNP or CCDP certification. Whether you are studying to become CCNP- or CCDP-certified or simply are seeking to gain a better understanding of the products, services, and policies that enable you to control traffic over LANs and WANs and to connect corporate networks to an Internet service provider, you will benefit from the information presented in this book.

Cisco and Cisco Press present this material in text-based format to provide another learning vehicle for our customers and the broader user community in general. Although a publication does not duplicate the instructor-led or e-learning environments, we acknowledge that not everyone responds in the same way to the samedelivery mechanism. It is our intent that presenting this material via a Cisco Press publication will enhance the transfer of knowledge to a broad audience of networking professionals.

Along with Interconnecting Cisco Network Devices, Designing Cisco Networks, Building Cisco Remote Access Networks, Building Cisco Multilayer Switched Networks, Cisco Internetwork Troubleshooting, and Cisco Internetwork Design, this course supplement covers all of the most current recommended training courses developed by Cisco Systems for the CCNA, CCDA, CCNP, and CCDP routing and switching certification tracks.

Cisco Press will present existing and future courses through these coursebooks to help achieve Cisco Worldwide Training's principal objectives: to educate the Cisco community of networking professionals and to enable that community to build and maintain reliable, scalable networks. The Cisco Career Certifications and classes that support these certifications are directed at meeting these objectives through a disciplined approach to progressive learning. The books Cisco Press creates in partnership with Cisco Systems will meet the same standards for content quality demanded of our courses and certifications. It is our intent that you will find this and subsequent Cisco Press certification and training publications of value as you build your networking knowledge base.

Thomas M. Kelly
Vice President, Worldwide Training
Cisco Systems, Inc.
June 2000

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2001

    a very comprehensive book...

    all you every need to know to pass he ccnp routing exam..great book, lots of configuration sample and excercises....passed 890

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