Building Security: Handbook for Architectural Planning and Design / Edition 1

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Overview

Whether planning for new construction, renovations, or security upgrades of existing facilities, Building Security: Handbook for Architectural Planning and Design is the definitive twenty-first century reference on security design, technology, building operations, and disaster planning. Award-winning architect and author Barbara A. Nadel, FAIA provides security design solutions for creating safe commercial, institutional, industrial, and residential buildings in the post-September 11, 2001, environment. Generously illustrated with 600 photos, drawings, tables, and checklists, this comprehensive compendium addresses protection from terrorism, natural disasters, chemical and biological agents, crime, and workplace violence, along with thorough, detailed coverage of:

* Lessons learned from benchmark events

* Planning and design of over 20 building types

* Historic preservation security guidelines

* Home and business disaster planning, response, and recovery

* Emergency management and facility procedures

* Protective structural design

* Mechanical, electrical, and fire protection design

* Chemical and biological protection

* Construction site emergency response guidelines

* Technology and security design

* Codes, standards, and security guidelines

* Liability exposure after September 11, 2001

This essential volume is the single-source reference for architects, engineers, planners, building owners, facility managers, construction and real estate professionals, public officials, safety specialists, educators, and students seeking to create safe, secure, and well-designed environments. Building Security: Handbook for Architectural Planning and Design received the 2003 Milka Bliznakov Prize Commendation from the International Archive of Women in Architecture.

Book Description:

* Illustrates how to assess and respond to threats from terrorism, natural disasters, emergencies, chemical and biological agents, crime, and workplace safety

* Provides one-stop reference on security planning, design, technology, building operations, disaster response, recovery, and crisis management

* Includes over 50 multidisciplinary contributors from over 30 professional firms, public agencies and nonprofit organizations across the United States

CONTRIBUTOR AFFILIATIONS

AMEC Construction Management Inc.

The Anti-Defamation League

Art Commission of the City of New York

Barbara Nadel Architect

Battelle Memorial Institute

DMJM

Flack + Kurtz Inc.

Fougeron Architecture

Harper Perkins Architects

HLW International LLP

HOK Sport + Venue +Event

International Association of Assembly Managers

KGA Architecture

National Crime Prevention Council

National Multi Housing Council

National Park Service

New York State Department of Correctional Services

New York State Department of Health

Oldcastle Glass

Planned Parenthood

RKK&G Museum & Cultural Facilities Consultants, Inc.

RTKL Associates, Inc.

Sako & Associates, Inc.

Skanska USA Building Inc

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

Terrance J. Brown, FAIA

Thomas Blurock Architects

Thomas Phifer & Partners

The Thornton-Tomasetti Group Inc.

U.S. General Services Administration

Victor O. Schinnerer & Company, Inc.

Zetlin & De Chiara LLP

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Editorial Reviews

The Kentucky Post
Excerpts from article by Shelly Whitehead

A Farewell to Mayberry

Enhancing building security was top priority for new Boone facility

Kevlar walls. Blast windows. Blow rooms. In a post-9-11 world, designing secure buildings to protect and serve those sworn to protect and serve has gotten very complicated and costly. ….Security actually begins outside the building, where cameras record who enters what door and at what time, while a gated parking area ensures that only authorized employees' cars park in the walled lot adjoining the building. Such perimeter security considerations are primary in the minds of architects when designing critical infrastructure buildings like police departments.

"Every law enforcement agency is concerned about threats and being a target," said Barbara A. Nadel, a New York City-based fellow of the American Institute of Architects who this week publishes her voluminous reference book, "Building Security: Handbook for Architectural Planning and Design." "So if you go from the baseline that a police station is a target," she asked, "what do you do from there?" Ideally, she said, such buildings should have a setback from the road of 50 feet or more. "Then they have to take a look at access roads and — how traffic and circulation goes toward a building."

..predicament for many law enforcement agencies struggling to build or renovate more secure quarters: They must create a facility which balances the need for a receptive, citizen-friendly environment with the

demand for a facility that is hardened against the violent and criminal forces that might stymie their efforts to protect and serve.

In fact, the predicament is so pervasive today Nadel said it's spawned a whole new architectural subheading called "transparent security." In essence, this means building safeguards into a structure through unobtrusive and sometimes invisible features.

"Everybody is concerned about this because they don't want to build fortresses. So what a lot of us are trying to do is to encourage transparent security. It is invisible to the public eye, but it's there," Nadel said.

"It's things like setbacks, laminated glass, blast windows. — Then on the mechanical engineering side — there are subtle things like moving air supply vents several stories higher — where somebody can't throw some

substance into it and affect everybody inside."

As with Kentucky's police accreditation program, Nadel's book draws its recommendations for the future from the lessons learned through past tragedies, as interpreted by more than 50 multidisciplinary national experts. She says that, for all their collective horror, events like the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing and 2001 terrorist attacks spoke volumes to law enforcement

and other emergency responders about protecting themselves so that they might protect everyone else during mass tragedies. ...

The Kentucky Post
Excerpts from article by Shelly Whitehead

A Farewell to Mayberry

Enhancing building security was top priority for new Boone facility

Kevlar walls. Blast windows. Blow rooms. In a post-9-11 world, designing secure buildings to protect and serve those sworn to protect and serve has gotten very complicated and costly. ….Security actually begins outside the building, where cameras record who enters what door and at what time, while a gated parking area ensures that only authorized employees' cars park in the walled lot adjoining the building. Such perimeter security considerations are primary in the minds of architects when designing critical infrastructure buildings like police departments.

"Every law enforcement agency is concerned about threats and being a target," said Barbara A. Nadel, a New York City-based fellow of the American Institute of Architects who this week publishes her voluminous reference book, "Building Security: Handbook for Architectural Planning and Design." "So if you go from the baseline that a police station is a target," she asked, "what do you do from there?" Ideally, she said, such buildings should have a setback from the road of 50 feet or more. "Then they have to take a look at access roads and -- how traffic and circulation goes toward a building."

..predicament for many law enforcement agencies struggling to build or renovate more secure quarters: They must create a facility which balances the need for a receptive, citizen-friendly environment with the

demand for a facility that is hardened against the violent and criminal forces that might stymie their efforts to protect and serve.

In fact, the predicament is so pervasive today Nadel said it's spawned a whole new architectural subheading called "transparent security." In essence, this means building safeguards into a structure through unobtrusive and sometimes invisible features.

"Everybody is concerned about this because they don't want to build fortresses. So what a lot of us are trying to do is to encourage transparent security. It is invisible to the public eye, but it's there," Nadel said.

"It's things like setbacks, laminated glass, blast windows. -- Then on the mechanical engineering side -- there are subtle things like moving air supply vents several stories higher -- where somebody can't throw some

substance into it and affect everybody inside."

As with Kentucky's police accreditation program, Nadel's book draws its recommendations for the future from the lessons learned through past tragedies, as interpreted by more than 50 multidisciplinary national experts. She says that, for all their collective horror, events like the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing and 2001 terrorist attacks spoke volumes to law enforcement

and other emergency responders about protecting themselves so that they might protect everyone else during mass tragedies. ...

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780071411714
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing
  • Publication date: 4/6/2004
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 672
  • Product dimensions: 7.80 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 1.44 (d)

Meet the Author

Barbara A. Nadel, FAIA, principal of Barbara Nadel Architect, specializes in planning and design of justice, healthcare, and institutional facilities. As an accomplished practitioner and journalist, Ms. Nadel's work on design, security, technology, and business has appeared in over 100 publications, including Architectural Record, Engineering News Record, and Time Saver Standards for Building Types. She has been interviewed and quoted in many publications and media outlets, including The New York Times, Fox News Channel, The Wall Street Journal, Newsday, La Libre Belgique, and others.

Well known in the architecture, design, and construction industry, Ms. Nadel was national 2001 Vice President of the American Institute of Architects, served twice on the national AIA Board of Directors, chaired the AIA Advertising Committee (responsible for creating a multimillion dollar print and radio advertising campaign), and chaired the AIA Committee on Architecture for Justice. She has received honor awards for outstanding leadership, service, and impact on the architectural profession.

Ms. Nadel is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design (Bachelor of Architecture, Bachelor of Fine Arts) and the State University of New York at Binghamton (Bachelor of Arts, Pre-Architecture). She has taught design and is a frequent guest lecturer and design award juror.

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Table of Contents

Part I: Achieving Transparent Security

Chapter 1: Lessons Learned from September 11, 2001 and other Benchmark Events

Chapter 2: Security Master Planning

Chapter 3: Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design

Part II: Planning & Design

Chapter 4: Arenas, Sports Facilities, Convention Centers, Performing Arts Facilities: Safety and Security after September 11, 2001

Chapter 5: Commercial High-Rise Egress Systems

Chapter 6: Courthouse Security

Chapter 7: Federally Owned or Leased Office Buildings: Security Design

Chapter 8: Health Care Security

Chapter 9: Historic Preservation Guidance for Security Design

Chapter 10: Hospitality Facilities: Security Planning and Design

Chapter 11: Multifamily Housing: Security Checklist for Building Owners and Real Estate Professionals

Chapter 12: Home and Business Security, Disaster Planning, Response and Recovery

Chapter 13: Industrial Facilities: Safety, Security, Site Selection and Workplace Violence

Chapter 14: Lobby Security Design: First Impressions

Chapter 15: Museum and Cultural Facility Security

Chapter 16: Perimeter Security: The Aesthetics of Protection

Chapter 17: Religious Institutions and Community Centers: Security Planning

Chapter 18: Research Facilities: Security Planning

Chapter 19: Retail Security Design

Chapter 20: School Security: Designing Safe Learning Environments

Chapter 21: Women's Health Centers: Workplace Safety and Security

Part III: Engineering

Chapter 22: Protective Design of Structures

Chapter 23: Mechanical, Electrical, Fire Protection Design

Chapter 24: Chemical and Biological Protection

Chapter 25: Construction Cost Estimating for Security Related Projects

Chapter 26: Construction: Emergency Response - Lessons Learned from September 11, 2001

Part IV: Technology and Materials

Chapter 27: Security Technology

Chapter 28: Selecting and Specifying Security Technology Products: A Primer for Building Owners and Facility Managers

Chapter 29: Glazing and Security Glass Applications

Part V: Codes and Liability

Chapter 30: Codes, Standards, and Guidelines for Security Planning and Design

Chapter 31: Liability Exposure After September 11, 2001 

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2006

    The Final Word on Building Security

    Nadel¿s Building Security: Handbook for Architectural Planning and Design is the final word on the creation a safe built environment. From broad case study analysis (Oklahoma City) to engineering details and protocol checklists, this tome provides owners, the entire design team and safety officials all the information they need to secure a structure and plan for responses to incidents. Building Security is simply the best work on the subject out there and I highly recommend it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2004

    The Zen of Security: A must have

    Security from soup to nuts, here it is, in one book. Big picture ideas, nitty gritty details, many different security concepts. Lots of tips and checklists on how anyone can apply them in any scenario or location. Packed with all kinds of useful information for designers, building owners, security personnel, students, professors, and just plain folks. Easy to read, well-edited and organized, beautifully illustrated, very user-friendly. Simply a remarkable volume about one of the most important subjects on the planet. Destined to become the bible for security experts - or those who wish they were!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2004

    The Must-Have Security Reference

    Barbara Nadel did it right, and the wait was worth it. She invited the best minds in the design and security fields to present their expertise in a comprehensive, easy-to-read format. An excellent reference, stands above the crowd! Don't reinvent the wheel--find out what works here and use it to protect your personnel and assets.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2004

    A must for every architect/engineer.

    This book contains first hand security information for today, 2004, offering help with every type of probable events that the architect/engineer/owner may encounter giving web sites and ways to ask questions.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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