Building Solutions with the Microsoft.Net Compact Framework: Architecture and Best Practices for Mobile Development

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“If you’ve been looking for one book on the .NET Compact Framework that will teach you everything you need to know, look no further—this is it! Jon and Dan do a wonderful job of covering this content, so that readers are sure to find much enlightenment within these pages.”

Derek Ferguson, Chief Technology Evangelist, Expand Beyond Corporation

“While many technical books focus on API details, this book covers architectures and best practices. It highlights the special concerns for .NET mobile development. It is ...

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Overview

“If you’ve been looking for one book on the .NET Compact Framework that will teach you everything you need to know, look no further—this is it! Jon and Dan do a wonderful job of covering this content, so that readers are sure to find much enlightenment within these pages.”

Derek Ferguson, Chief Technology Evangelist, Expand Beyond Corporation

“While many technical books focus on API details, this book covers architectures and best practices. It highlights the special concerns for .NET mobile development. It is an excellent book for experienced .NET developers who want to transfer their skills to the red-hot mobility arena.”

Michael Yuan, University of Texas at Austin

“Moving to the .NET Compact Framework is about to become much easier with the aid of this book. The samples and supplied utility code will help you get a running start on your own mobile development projects.”

Kent Sharkey, Program Manager, MSDN

“This book is the starting place for development on devices using the Microsoft Compact Framework. Whether you are doing business or commercial applications, this book is the resource to kick-start your journey into mobile development.”

Stephen Forte, CTO, Corzen, Inc.

“The .NET Compact Framework brings the power of .NET programming to mobile devices. Dan and Jon’s book is an excellent resource to help build your programming skills in the mobility area.”

Kevin Lisota, Product Manager, Mobile Devices Division, Microsoft Corporation

“Mobile applications are truly a new class of applications and having feature-rich development tools and infrastructures like VS .NET and the .NET Compact Framework is only half the battle of learning to build them. It’s great to see Dan and Jon apply their in-depth knowledge of the .NET Compact Framework to cover the important topics that everybody learning to build mobile applications should understand.”

Craig Neable, .NET Evangelist, Microsoft Corporation

“Mobile solutions and their development present new challenges for enterprises, especially with disconnected/synchronization scenarios. Leveraging best practices and planning mobile development properly are essential to the successful implementation. Building Solutions with the Microsoft .NET Compact Framework provides a solid introduction to mobile development and best practices. It is a great resource for experienced architects and developers who are new to mobile solution development.”

Steve Milroy, Solutions Director, Mobility and Emerging Technologies, Immedient Corporation

Whether you are an architect, developer, or manager, Building Solutions with the Microsoft .NET Compact Framework is your guide to creating effective solutions for mobile devices with .NET. Authors Dan Fox and Jon Box walk you through four essential architectural concepts and programming techniques, using extensive examples and code listings to show you how to develop more robust mobile development projects.

The book briefly describes the context, architecture, and features of both the Framework and Smart Device Programmability (SDP). The heart of the book is its in-depth coverage of key architectural concepts, including local data handling, remote data access (RDA) architectures, robust data caching with SQL Server 2000 Windows CE Edition 2.0 (SQL CE 2.0), and synchronization options. The focus then shifts to localization, security, and deployment, and the final chapter steers you away from potential pitfalls.

You will find helpful pointers to further resources throughout, and a companion Web site includes the source code and links to more information.

This book can be read cover to cover or the focus can be narrowed to key points of interest. It can also be used as a reference, with answers to questions such as:

  • When should you architect and build your applications using the Compact Framework and SDP? Chapter 1
  • What factors besides cost should you consider when planning your company's first Smart Device application? Chapter 4
  • Can RDA allow SQL CE to interact with database products other than SQL Server? Chapter 7
  • How should you handle differences in time zone for users of a world-ready application? Chapter 8
  • How can you overcome the Compact Framework's inability to marshal complex objects within structures? Chapter 11

Both comprehensive and concise, Building Solutions with the Microsoft .NET Compact Framework shows you how to bring the power of .NET to your mobile applications.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780321197887
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 10/28/2003
  • Pages: 400
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

0321197887AB07242003

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Table of Contents

Foreword.

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

About the Authors.

I. THE PDA DEVELOPMENT LANDSCAPE WITH THE COMPACT FRAMEWORK.

1. The Rise of Mobile Devices.

Executive Summary.

The Need for Mobility.

Information Anywhere, Anytime, and on Any Device.

Using Information.

Anywhere and Anytime.

On Any Device.

Microsoft and Mobility.

Operating Systems.

Platforms.

Development Tools.

The Compact Framework and SDP in Context.

The Role of the ASP.NET Mobile Controls.

What's Ahead.

Related Reading.

2. Components of Mobile Development.

Executive Summary.

.NET and Smart Devices.

XML Web Services.

Windows .NET Framework.

Goals of the Compact Framework and SDP.

The .NET Compact Framework.

Architecture.

Portability.

SDP.

Project System.

.NET Language Support.

UI Support.

Emulators.

Debugging.

Additional Tools.

What's Ahead.

Related Reading.

II. ESSENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL CONCEPTS.

3. Accessing Local Data.

Executive Summary.

The Need for Local Data Handling.

Using File I/O.

Reading and Writing Text Files.

Asynchronous File Access.

Manipulating Files and Directories.

Handling XML.

Using the DOM.

Using XML Readers and Writers.

Using XML Writers.

Working with Relational Data.

ADO.NET in the Compact Framework.

Reading and Writing Data.

Displaying Data.

Data Binding.

Manual Binding.

What's Ahead.

Related Reading.

4. Accessing Remote Data.

Executive Summary.

Have PDA, Will Travel.

Wireless Application Factors around Accessing Remote Data.

Application Factors.

Connection Type and Distance.

Throughput.

Battery Power.

Communication Hardware for the Mobile Device.

Cost.

How the Compact Framework Addresses Accessing Remote Data.

XML Web Services.

Accessing SQL Server Remotely.

Using Pluggable Protocols.

Direct Communication with Sockets.

Communicating with TCP and UDP.

Communicating Using Infrared.

Other Issues in Network Communications.

Compact Framework Asynchronous Capabilities in Networking.

What's Ahead.

Related Reading.

5. Caching Data with SQL Server CE.

Executive Summary.

The Role of SQLCE.

History of SQLCE.

Robust Data Caching.

SQLCE Architecture.

SQL Server CE Engine.

Query Analyzer.

Accessing SQLCE.

SqlServerCe Provider Architecture.

Manipulating Data with SqlServerCe.

Administering SQLCE.

Security.

Database Maintenance.

Installation and Deployment.

What's Ahead.

Related Reading.

6. Primitive Synchronization.

Executive Summary.

The Importance of Synchronization.

What ActiveSync Is.

Backup and Restore.

Software Install.

Mobile Explorer.

File Conversion.

Remote Communication.

Connection Notification.

The ActiveSync Architecture.

ActiveSync Service Manager.

ActiveSync Providers.

Creating a Partnership.

Developing ActiveSync Applications.

A Managed Application Using File Synchronization.

Utilizing RAPI in a Managed Application.

Considerations for a Pass-Through Application.

What's Ahead.

Related Reading.

7. Data Synchronization.

Executive Summary.

SQLCE Synchronization.

Connectivity Architecture.

Connectivity Features.

RDA.

Features and Scenarios.

Configuration.

Using RDA.

Merge Replication.

Features and Scenarios.

Configuration.

Using Replication.

What's Ahead.

Related Reading.

III. ADDITIONAL PROGRAMMING CONSIDERATIONS.

8. Localization.

Executive Summary.

The Need for Globalization and Localization.

Guidelines for Globalization and Localization.

Globalization and Localization Support.

Understanding Cultures.

Localizing Data.

Using Resources and Satellite Assemblies.

Other Localization Issues.

Localized Exception Strings.

Testing World-Ready Applications.

What's Ahead.

Related Reading.

9. Securing Compact Framework Solutions.

Executive Summary.

Security Issues and Principles.

Securing the Device.

Authentication.

Antivirus Protection.

Lockdown.

Securing the Application.

Authentication.

Data Protection.

Securing User Input.

Securing Communications.

Secure Sockets Layer.

Virtual Private Networks.

Wired Equivalent Privacy.

Custom SOAP Extensions.

What's Ahead.

Related Reading.

10. Packaging and Deployment.

Executive Summary.

Packaging and Deploying in the Compact Framework.

Versioning in the Compact Framework.

Private Assemblies.

Shared Assemblies.

Packaging Compact Framework Applications.

Setting Project and File Options.

Creating a CAB File.

Deployment and Installation.

Using ActiveSync.

Using a Web Site.

Using a Storage Card.

Using a File Share.

Setting Up Autodeployment.

What's Ahead.

Related Reading.

11. Developer Challenges.

Executive Summary.

Issues and Challenges.

Augmenting the Compact Framework.

Using PInvoke.

Additional Tools.

Measuring and Improving Performance.

Measuring Performance.

Enabling Performance Statistics.

Performance Issues.

Improving Performance.

A Final Word.

Related Reading.

Index.

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Preface

A Brave New World

The last three years have been exciting times for architects and developers. Microsoft, in the spring of 2000, first announced a vision for computing termed Next Generation Windows Services (NGWS), which in February of 2002 materialized as Visual Studio .NET (VS .NET) and the Microsoft Windows .NET Framework. These products brought object-oriented programming to the world of Web development and helped mainstream the paradigm of connected applications using XML Web Services.

However, it could be argued that the biggest boon for developers working with Microsoft development tools such as Visual Basic 6.0 (VB), Visual Interdev, Active Server Pages (ASP), and Visual C++ was that the introduction of the .NET Framework unified the programming model. Now, developers could use a common Integrated Development Environment (IDE), core languages, and tools and reap the benefits of rapid application development (RAD) programming inherent in VB, Web server applications with ASP, and powerful object-oriented development with Visual C++. This unification created opportunities for developers to extend their skills into new application areas by leveraging a core set of class libraries tied to a runtime engine and development environment.

Fast-forward a little more than a year. Microsoft has now built on the foundation laid by v1.0 of the Windows .NET Framework by releasing v1.1 and Visual Studio .NET 2003. In this release not only has Microsoft consolidated features released after the initial release to manufacturing (RTM), including ADO.NET Data Providers for ODBC and Oracle, Visual J#, and ASP.NET Mobile Controls--formerly the Microsoft Mobile Internet Toolkit (MMIT)--it has further expanded the reach of developers by including the Compact Framework and Smart Device Projects (SDP). These two together allow developers familiar with the desktop Framework to use the same core languages (VB and C#), runtime engine, and IDE to create applications targeted to smart devices, such as the Pocket PC 2002.

But with this increased opportunity come additional challenges for architects and developers. The key is to understand not only the nuts and bolts of the technology, but how and in what scenarios to apply it when building solutions. This is the reason we wrote this book, and we hope the reason you've decided to read it. That is also why we strive in each section to provide the big picture in order to give you enough technical information to understand the challenges and techniques that can be used, while not getting bogged down in every last detail of implementation. For this reason, you'll notice that we rely heavily on short code snippets, listings, and pointers to other resources.

A Note about Audience

As mentioned in the previous section, we've written this book with architects, technical managers, and developers working in the corporate world in mind. Because these three roles often have a large diversity of skill sets, there may be parts of the discussion that are too detailed for some readers. If you find this to be the case, we urge you to rely on the executive summaries at the beginning of each chapter, which summarize key chapter points. We also recommend looking for the key point icons in the margins. These icons indicate special considerations or, as the name implies, key points that we don't want you to miss.

For other readers the code snippets and listings may leave you wanting more. This is good and done by design; for this reason at the end of each chapter we've included a "Related Reading" section that discusses chapter topics in greater depth. Because some of the entries in the "Related Reading" sections necessarily refer to Web sites, keep in mind that links may change, and you may need to search for the article title, rather than using the address provided. For your convenience, we've placed the links on our site at http://atomic.quilogy.com/cfbook and will do our best to keep them updated.

When considering the skill sets of developers and technical managers reading this book, we specifically had in mind (1) desktop Framework developers and managers who are now embarking on building smart device solutions, and (2) embedded VB developers who are now moving from eMbedded Visual Basic 3.0 (eVB) to the Compact Framework. As you can imagine, the needs of these two groups are inverse to one another. The former require little in the way of managed code and Visual Studio guidance, but more coverage of issues related to developing for mobile devices. The latter are already familiar with building solutions that include mobility but require information on Compact Framework specifics. Because satisfying both audiences is difficult, we've tried to walk a line that balances the two views without leaning too heavily in either direction.

Language Choice

One of the great benefits of working with the .NET Framework is the freedom to work in the language of your choice. This is an inherent benefit of working with code that is compiled first to an intermediate language and then finally to machine code at runtime.

Although the Compact Framework restricts this freedom somewhat through its support for either C# or VB .NET, applications written in either are functionally equivalent and on a par in terms of performance. And as with the desktop Framework, the class libraries that ship with the Compact Framework are the truly interesting part of the product because they encapsulate the functionality that developers will use. All the class libraries are accessible from either language, and so, learning what they have to offer, rather than language-specific syntax, is the key to building both desktop and Compact Framework applications.

For these reasons you'll notice that we included code snippets and listings in one of the two languages (not both, although rest assured that it is possible to translate any C# code to VB .NET and vice versa), although VB .NET is used more frequently to reflect the likelihood that a majority of eVB developers will choose to use VB .NET over C# because of its similarity to the syntax they are familiar with.

The Scope of This Book

This book is organized into three parts: The PDA Development Landscape with the Compact Framework, Essential Architectural Concepts, and Additional Programming Considerations. Each of the parts varies in length, with Part II, which describes the central architectures for handling data, being the largest and consisting of four key topics in five chapters.

The PDA Development Landscape with the Compact Framework

The first part of this book consists of Chapters 1 and 2 and lays the foundation for architecting solutions using the Compact Framework. The goals of these chapters are to put the Compact Framework in the context of mobility (Chapter 1) and to explicate the architecture and core features (Chapter 2) of the Compact Framework and SDP.

Together these chapters are written so that architects and developers will gain an understanding of how the Compact Framework is positioned and why you might want to develop solutions using this technology.

Essential Architectural Concepts

The part on architectural concepts is broken into four key topics that architects and developers typically need to address in their solutions:

  1. Local data handling. Business solutions that are written using the Compact Framework will typically need to be able to handle relational, file-based, and XML data in order to display it to the user. Chapter 3 addresses this need by discussing how applications can access local data using the support in the Compact Framework for processing XML, reading and writing to files, and using ADO.NET. The techniques in this chapter apply to handling disconnected data, as well as data downloaded from a remote source.
  2. Remote data access (RDA). Business solutions also have the need for accessing data over the Internet or on corporate networks. Chapter 4 addresses this requirement by discussing various architectures for accessing remote data including XML Web Services, sending HTTP requests, low-level networking using sockets and infrared standards developed by the Infrared Data Association (IrDA), and accessing Microsoft SQL Server 2000 remotely. The techniques in this chapter apply to connected scenarios.
  3. Robust data caching. Chapter 5 discusses how applications can cache data locally on a device using SQL Server 2000 Windows CE Edition 2.0 (SQLCE 2.0). Most of the discussion will focus on the uses for and features of SQLCE 2.0 because it has many advantages over simply caching data through the use of files.
  4. Synchronization. Finally, Chapters 6 and 7 discuss ways in which data can be synchronized, including a discussion of simple synchronization with a host PC using ActiveSync (Chapter 6) and following with the RDA and merge replication features of SQLCE 2.0.

Of course, all of these topics reflect the centrality of data access. This is no coincidence, because architecting and developing business solutions involve, in large measure, moving data around, editing it, saving it, and synchronizing it. As a result, in our discussion of the third and fourth concepts mentioned here, we focus considerably on SQLCE 2.0 and how it can be used with the Compact Framework.

This book does not address architecting solutions using Microsoft ASP.NET Mobile Controls (formerly MMIT)--a set of ASP.NET server controls that enables the development of Web applications for a variety of mobile devices--because there are other good resources already available and because the kinds of applications developed with Mobile Controls are fundamentally different from those developed with the .NET Compact Framework.

Additional Programming Considerations

The third part of the book consists of three topics that most mobile solutions will need to address: localization, security, deployment, and developer challenges.

Chapter 8 addresses how Compact Framework applications can be architected to adapt to devices running in different geographies. Chapter 9 is dedicated to the various techniques for securing both the device on which the Compact Framework code runs as well as its data. Chapter 10 discusses techniques for deploying Compact Framework solutions. Finally, the book concludes with a single chapter that discusses some of the challenges developers will face when building solutions with the Compact Framework. Many of these challenges relate to implementing features that are not directly supported by the Compact Framework or that are somewhat difficult to grasp at first.

Final Words

In addition to our consulting and teaching activities, we write technical articles (including some on the Compact Framework) for our Web site at http://atomic.quilogy.com. We encourage you to check out the site and hope you'll use it as a technical resource.

In the end our hope is that you will feel the time and money invested in this book have been worth it because you have taken away important concepts and techniques that you can apply as you build great solutions using the Compact Framework. If you have questions or comments, please feel free to e-mail us at atomic@quilogy.com.

Dan Fox
Shawnee, Kansas

Jon Box
Memphis, Tennessee

October 2003

0321197887P10212003

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Introduction

A Brave New World

The last three years have been exciting times for architects and developers. Microsoft, in the spring of 2000, first announced a vision for computing termed Next Generation Windows Services (NGWS), that in February 2002 materialized as Visual Studio .NET (VS .NET) and the Microsoft Windows .NET Framework. These products brought object-oriented programming to world of web development and helped mainstream the paradigm of connected applications using XML Web Services. However, it could be argued that the biggest boon for developers working with Microsoft development tools such as Visual Basic 6.0, Visual Interdev and Active Server Pages (ASP), and Visual C++ was that the introduction of the .NET Framework unified the programming model. Now, developers could use a common IDE, core languages, and tools and reap the benefits of RAD programming inherent in VB, web server applications with ASP, and powerful object-oriented development with Visual C++. This unification created opportunities for developers to extend their skills into new application areas by leveraging a core set of class libraries tied to a runtime engine and development environment.

Fast forward a little more than a year. Microsoft has now built on the foundation laid by v1.0 of the Windows .NET Framework by releasing v1.1 and Visual Studio .NET 2003. In this release not only has Microsoft consolidated features released after the initial RTM including ADO.NET Data Provider for ODBC and Oracle, Visual J#, and ASP.NET Mobile Controls (formerly the Microsoft Mobile Internet Toolkit), it has further expanded the reach of developers by including the Compact Framework and Smart Device Project.These two together allow developers familiar with the desktop Framework to use the same core languages (VB and C#), runtime engine, and IDE to create applications targeted to smart devices such as the Pocket PC 2002.

But with this increased opportunity come additional challenges for architects and developers. Understanding not only the nuts and bolts of the technology but how and in what scenarios to apply it when building solutions is the key. This is the reason we wrote this book and we hope the reason you've decided to read it. That is also why we strive in each section to provide the big picture in order to give you enough technical information to understand the challenges and techniques that can be used while at the same time not getting bogged down in every last detail of implementation. For this reason, you'll notice that we rely heavily on short code snippets, listings, and pointers to other resources.

A Note about Audience

As mentioned in the previous section we've written this book with architects, technical managers and developers working in the corporate world in mind. Because these three roles often have a large diversity of skill sets there may be parts of the discussion that are too detailed for some readers. If you find this to be the case we'd urge you to rely on the Executive Summaries at the beginning of each chapter that include the key points in the chapter in a summarized form. We'd also recommend looking for the key point icons can we put the key point icon here? in the margins. These icons indicate special considerations or, as the name implies, key points that we don't want you to miss.

For other readers the code snippets and listing may leave you wanting more. This is good and by design. For this reason we've included a Related Readings section at the end of each chapter that you should refer to to go deeper in depth. Since some of the entries in the Related Readings section necessarily refer to web sites, keep in mind that links may change and you may need to search for the article title rather than using the address provided. For your convenience we've placed the links on our site and will do our best to keep them updated.

When considering the skillsets of developers and technical managers reading this book, we specifically had in mind, 1) desktop Framework developers and managers who are now embarking on building smart device solutions, and 2) embedded Visual Basic developers who are now moving from eVB to the Compact Framework. As you can imagine the needs of these two groups are the inverse of one another. The former requires little in the way of managed code and Visual Studio guidance but more coverage of issues related to developing for mobile devices. The latter is already familiar with building solutions that include mobility but require information on Compact Framework specifics. Because satisfying both audiences is difficult we've tried to walk a line that balances the two views without leaning two heavily in either direction.

Language Choice

One of the great benefits of working with the .NET Framework is the freedom to work in the language of your choice. This is an inherent benefit of working with code that is compiled first to an intermediate language and then finally to machine code at runtime.

Although the Compact Framework restricts this freedom somewhat through its support for either C# or VB .NET, applications written in either are functionally equivalent and on a par in terms of performance. And as with the desktop Framework, the class libraries that ship with the Compact Framework are the truly interesting part of the product since they encapsulate the functionality that developers will use. All the class libraries are accessible from either language and so learning what they have to offer, rather than language-specific syntax, is the key to building both desktop and Compact Framework applications.

For these reasons you'll notice that we included code snippets and listings in one of the two languages (not both, although rest assured that it is possible to translate any C# code to VB .NET and vice versa) although VB .NET is used more frequently to reflect the likelihood that a majority of eVB developers will choose to use VB .NET over C# because of its similarity to syntax they are familiar with.

The Scope of This Book

This book is organized into four sections; The PDA Development Landscape and the Compact Framework, Essential Architectural Concepts, Supporting Considerations, and Developer Challenges. Each of the four sections varies in length with section two describing the central architectures for handling data being the largest and consisting of four key topics in five chapters.

The PDA Development Landscape and the Compact Framework

The first section of this book consists of Chapters 1 and 2 and lays the foundation for architecting solutions using the Compact Framework. The goals of this chapter and the next are to put the Compact Framework in the context of mobility (Chapter 1) and to explicate the architecture and core features (Chapter 2) of the Compact Framework and SDP.

Together these chapters are written so that architects and developers will gain an understanding of how the Compact Framework is positioned and why you might want to develop solutions using this technology.

Essential Architectural Concepts

The core of the section on architectural concepts is broken into four key topics that architects and developers typically need to address in their solutions. These include:

  • Local Data Handling. Business solutions that are written using the Compact Framework will typically need to be able to handle relational, file based, and XML data in order to display it to the user. Chapter 3 addresses this need by discussing how applications can access local data using the support in the Compact Framework for processing XML, reading and writing to files, and using ADO.NET. The techniques in this chapter apply to handling disconnected data as well as data downloaded from a remote source.
  • Remote Data Access. Business solutions also have the need for accessing data over the Internet or on corporate networks. Chapter 4 addresses this requirement by discussing various architectures for accessing remote data including XML Web Services, sending HTTP requests, low-level networking using sockets and IrDA, and accessing Microsoft SQL Server 2000 remotely. The techniques in this chapter apply to connected scenarios.
  • Robust Data Caching. Chapter 5 discusses how applications can cache data locally on a device using SQL Server 2000 Windows CE Edition 2.0 (SQLCE 2.0). Most of the discussion will focus on the uses for and features of SQLCE 2.0 since it has many advantages over simply caching data through the use of files.
  • Synchronization. Finally, Chapters 6 and 7 discuss ways in which data can be synchronized including a discussion of simple synchronization with a host PC using ActiveSync (Chapter 6) and following with the Remote Data Access (RDA) and merge replication features of SQLCE 2.0.

Of course, all of these topics reflect on the centrality of data access. It is no coincidence that this is the case since architecting and developing business solutions is, in large measure, an exercise in moving data around, editing it, saving it, and synchronizing it. As a result, the third and fourth concepts just discussed spend a considerable amount of time focusing on SQLCE 2.0 and how it can be used with the Compact Framework.

This book does not address architecting solutions using the use of the Microsoft ASP.NET Mobile Controls (formerly the Microsoft Mobile Internet Toolkit), a set of ASP.NET server controls that enable web applications to be developed for a variety of mobile devices. This is the case since there are other good resources already available and because the kinds of applications developed with mobile controls are fundamentally different than those developed with the .NET Compact Framework.

Supporting Considerations

The third section of the book consists of three topics that most mobile solutions will need to address; localization, security, and deployment. Chapter 8 addresses how Compact Framework applications can be architected to adapt to devices running in different geographies, Chapter 9 is dedicated to the various techniques for securing both the device on which the Compact Framework code runs as well as its data, and chapter 10 discusses techniques for deploying Compact Framework solutions.

Developer Challenges

The book concludes with a single chapter the discusses some of the challenges developers will face when building solutions with the Compact Framework. Many of these challenges relate to implementing features that are not directly supported by the Compact Framework or that are somewhat difficult to grasp at first.

Final Words

In addition to our consulting and teaching activities we write technical articles (including some on the Compact Framework) for our web site. We encourage you to check out the site and hope you'll use it as a technical resource.

In the end our hope is that you feel the time and money invested in this book has been worth it by being able to take away important concepts and techniques that you can apply as you build great solutions using the Compact Framework. If you have questions or comments please feel free to contact us at our email address.

Dan Fox
Shawnee, KS
May 2003

Jon Box
Memphis, TN
May 2003

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Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

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