Building Strong Brands

Building Strong Brands

3.3 3
by David A. Aaker
     
 

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ISBN-10: 002900151X

ISBN-13: 9780029001516

Pub. Date: 12/28/1995

Publisher: Free Press

In this compelling work, Aaker uses real brand-building cases from Saturn, General Electric, Kodak, Healthy Choice, McDonald's, and others to demonstrate how strong brands have been created and managed.

As industries turn increasingly hostile, it is clear that strong brand-building skills are needed to survive and prosper. In David Aaker's pathbreaking book,

Overview

In this compelling work, Aaker uses real brand-building cases from Saturn, General Electric, Kodak, Healthy Choice, McDonald's, and others to demonstrate how strong brands have been created and managed.

As industries turn increasingly hostile, it is clear that strong brand-building skills are needed to survive and prosper. In David Aaker's pathbreaking book, Managing Brand Equity, managers discovered the value of a brand as a strategic asset and a company's primary source of competitive advantage. Now, in this compelling new work, Aaker uses real brand-building cases from Saturn, General Electric, Kodak, Healthy Choice, McDonald's, and others to demonstrate how strong brands have been created and managed.

A common pitfall of brand strategists is to focus on brand attributes. Aaker shows how to break out of the box by considering emotional and self-expressive benefits and by introducing the brand-as-person, brand-as-organization, and brand-as-symbol perspectives. The twin concepts of brand identity (the brand image that brand strategists aspire to create or maintain) and brand position (that part of the brand identity that is to be actively communicated) play a key role in managing the "out-of-the-box" brand.

A second pitfall is to ignore the fact that individual brands are part of a larger system consisting of many intertwined and overlapping brands and subbrands. Aaker shows how to manage the "brand system" to achieve clarity and synergy, to adapt to a changing environment, and to leverage brand assets into new markets and products.

Aaker also addresses practical management issues, introducing a set of brand equity measures, termed the brand equity ten, to help those who measure and track brand equity across products and markets. He presents and analyzes brand-nurturing organizational forms that are responsive to the challenges of coordinated brands across markets, products, roles, and contexts. Potentially destructive organizational pressures to change a brand's identity and position are also discussed.

As executives in a wide range of industries seek to prevent their products and services from becoming commodities, they are recommitting themselves to brands as a foundation of business strategy. This new work will be essential reading for the battle-ready.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780029001516
Publisher:
Free Press
Publication date:
12/28/1995
Pages:
400
Sales rank:
483,125
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.50(h) x 1.30(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

CONTENTS

Preface

1. What is a Strong Brand?

The Kodak Story

What Is Brand Equity?

Brand Awareness

Perceived Quality

Brand Loyalty

Brand Associations

Objectives of the Book

Building Strong Brands Why Is It Hard?

2. The Saturn Story

Saturn — A Strong Brand?

How Saturn Built a Brand

Challenges Facing Saturn and General Motors

3. The Brand Identity System

What Is Brand Identity?

Brand Identity Traps

Four Brand Identity Perspectives

The Identity Structure

Providing a Value Proposition

Providing Credibility

The Bottom Line: A Brand-Customer Relationship

Working with Multiple Brand Identities

4. Organizational Associations

The Body Shop Story

The Story of Branding in Japan

The Brand as Organization

Organizational Associations

How Organizational Associations Work

5. Brand Personality

The Harley-Davidson Story

Measuring Brand Personality

How a Brand Personality is Created

Why Use Brand Personality?

The Self-Expression Model

The Relationship Basis Model

The Functional Benefit Representation Model

Brand Personality versus User Imagery

Brand Personality as a Sustainable Advantage

6. Identity Implementation

The Brand Position

Achieving Brilliance in Execution

Tracking

A Strategic Brand Analysis

The Power of Brand Identity and Position

7. Brand Strategies Over Time

The General Electric Story

The Smirnoff Story

Why Change Identities, Positions or Executions?

Why Consistency (If Done Well) is Better

Consistency Over Time: Why Is It Hard?

The Search for the Fountain of Youth

8. Managing Brand Systems

Toward a System of Brands

Driver Roles

The Endorser Role

Strategic Brands

Subbrand Roles

Branding Benefits

Silver Bullets

How Many Brands?

9. Leveraging the Brand

The Healthy Choice Story

The Kingsford Charcoal Story

Line Extensions

Moving the Brand Down

Moving a Brand Up

Brand Extension Decisions

Creating Range Brands

Co-Branding

The Brand Systems Audit

10. Measuring Brand Equity Across Products & Markets

Young & Rubicam's Brand-Asset Valuator

Total Research's EquiTrend

Interbrand's Top Brands

Why Measure Brand Equity Across Products and Markets?

The Brand Equity Ten

Loyalty Measures

Perceived Quality and Leadership Measures

Associations/Differentiation Measures

Awareness Measures

Market Behavior Measures

Toward a Single Value of Brand Equity

Adapting the Measures to a Brand's Context

11. Organizing for Brand Building

Brand-Building Imperatives

Adapting the Organization for Brand Building

The Role of the Agency

A Parting Word

Notes

Index

About the Author

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Building Strong Brands 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I work for a relatively new division of an established company that is making its first forray into an old industry. Consequently, I have three responsibilities in regard to 'selling' my company's brand: 1) promote the company's overall brand, 2) help establish the relevance of the company's overall brand to this new market, and 3) help my department establish it's own sub-brand identity that is complimentary to - yet distinct from - #1 and #2 above. David Aacker's book has given me a lot of food for thought on how to accomplish these seemingly contradictory goals without diluting or compromising the messages I need to get across to clients by doing my job. I'm not in my company's marketing department, but 'Building Strong Brands' has helped me understand what it is our marketing people are trying to say about my company through its brand. More importantly, the book has helped me get the word out by making me aware of the fact that *how* I do my job is as important as *what* I do in establishing the meaning of the brand. Companies trying to distinguish themselves from their competition are doing themselves a disservice if they don't make excepts from this book required reading for all employees.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As advertised
Anonymous More than 1 year ago