Building the Real-Time Enterprise: An Executive Briefing / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 97%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (15) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $11.61   
  • Used (10) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$11.61
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(94)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2004-11-23 Hardcover New HARDCOVER, BRAND NEW COPY, Perfect Shape, No Black Remainder Mark,

Ships from: La Grange, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$12.67
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(94)

Condition: New
2004-11-23 Hardcover New HARDCOVER, BRAND NEW COPY, Perfect Shape, No Black Remainder Mark,

Ships from: La Grange, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$12.67
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(94)

Condition: New
2004-11-23 Hardcover New BRAND NEW COPY, Perfect Shape, No Black Remainder Mark,

Ships from: La Grange, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$24.95
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(80)

Condition: New
BRAND NEW IN SHRINK WRAP. Book has slight shelf wear from storage(Similar to what you see at retail chains); otherwise the book is in excellent condition.

Ships from: Naperville, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$36.71
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(0)

Condition: New
New FAST SHIPPING FROM UK WITH PROMPT SERVICE, BUBBLE WRAP. *****PLEASE NOTE: This item is shipping from an authorized seller in Europe. In the event that a return is necessary, ... you will be able to return your item within the US. To learn more about our European sellers and policies see the BookQuest FAQ section***** Read more Show Less

Ships from: LUTON, United Kingdom

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

This book is organized and laid out to provide information in quickly understandable chapters and in sections within chapters. Each chapter stands on its own and provides a usable body of information on an aspect of the real-time enterprise. Chapters includes diagrams, tables, and lists to illustrate and summarize key points and real-world case studies and executive interviews to provide further insight into the subject matter presented in the chapter.

Readers of this book will:

  • Gain a clear picture of how organizations can profit from use of real-time operations
  • Appreciate the theory, technology, and business practices that underpin the real-time enterprise
  • Learn a pragmatic and efficient approach for developing real-time systems in their own organizations

The author, Michael Hugos, is the chief information officer of Network Services Company, a $7 billion dollar distribution organization. He has over 20 years experience in applying technology to meet business challenges and he holds an MBA from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. His discussion of the real-time enterprise is a blend of both theoretical and practical perspectives based on his years of applying real-time concepts to actual business situations. He is also the author of Essentials of Supply Chain Management.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780471678298
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 11/12/2004
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 6.24 (w) x 9.15 (h) x 0.81 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael Hugos is CIO with Network Services Company, a $7-billion distribution co-op that is wholly owned by eighty-five member companies. Hugos has more than twenty years of experience in all aspects of information technology. In 2003, CIO Magazine presented Mr. Hugos and his company with the CIO 100 Award, which is given to the top 100 companies that successfully integrate operational systems and processes across their organizations. Hugos is the author of Essentials of Supply Chain Management, is a frequent speaker, and has written numerous articles for CIO Magazine, ComputerWorld, and Darwin Magazine.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

Chapter 1: The Promise of the Real-Time Enterprise.

Chapter 2: Roots of the Real-Time Enterprise.

Chapter 3: Structure of Real-Time Organizations.

Chapter 4: Embracing Change.

Chapter 5: Observe–Orient–Decide–Act.

Chapter 6: Resourceful Use of Information Technology.

Chapter 7: The Challenge of System Building.

Chapter 8: Developing Systems in Real Time.

Chapter 9: A Powerful Reinforcing Feedback Loop.

Chapter 10: The Illusion of Control.

Chapter 11: How to Tell a Winning Project from a Loser.

Index.

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Building the Real-Time Enterprise

An Executive Briefing
By Michael H. Hugos

John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0-471-67829-5


Chapter One

The Promise of the Real-Time Enterprise

We are in the stage of our economy where the fusing together of information technology and business operations is creating what has come to be called the real-time enterprise. Computers have been widely used in business for the last four decades, but what is happening now is something new. A wide array of information technology is being custom tailored and fine-tuned to fit people's precise needs. The real-time enterprise is an organization in which specific and relevant information-not just an indiscriminant flood of data-flows continuously to individual people throughout the organization. They use this information hour by hour, day to day, and week to week to perform their jobs at levels of efficiency and responsiveness not possible before.

Every well-rounded executive is expected to understand the essentials of finance, operations, marketing, and sales. Now every well-rounded executive also needs to understand the essentials of applying information technology (IT) to address common business problems. The rise of the real-time enterprise makes the use of IT central to a company's survival and success.

Executives can no longer allow themselves to be bewildered by technical discussions about information systems. They must be able to apply a basic understanding of how touse IT in business so that they can make their own assessments of existing and proposed information systems. They can no longer rely entirely on the advice of outside experts in this area.

There are technical specialists who build and operate computer systems just as there are accountants who keep a company's books, factory managers who run a company's factories, and salespeople who find customers for a company's products. The executive does not need to know all the details involved in each of these activities. What is necessary is that the executive understands enough about all of them to see how they work together and provide the company with its ability to profitably deliver products and services to its customers.

This book lays out the key concepts needed to effectively use information technology to create and sustain a real-time enterprise. The concepts are presented in the form of a business briefing. This chapter and the next one provide an overview of the main business issues and scientific foundations that underpin the real-time enterprise. The next four chapters then discuss how company structures and ways of doing business are changing as the full impact of IT is now being felt. The remaining chapters talk specifically about how an effective executive can identify the need for and oversee the development of the systems required to move their company into the real-time world.

Definition of the Real-Time Enterprise

A useful analogy is to think about the spread of electric power in the first decades of the twentieth century. Electricity was wired into factories, offices, and homes. The buildings themselves and the activities that could occur within those buildings changed profoundly as this happened. At first, the use of electricity for lighting, heating, and driving elevators, machines, and appliances was wondrous and amazing. Then it became the norm. We now expect buildings to be wired for electric power and most of us would hardly know how to operate in a building that did not have electricity.

A similar thing is happening with the spread of real-time IT. The nearly instantaneous delivery of information that this technology makes possible is changing the way organizations operate. Companies are leveraging and adding to their existing systems infrastructure to create real-time systems. Existing systems provide a foundation of basic business functionality, and this is being combined with new information technology to create systems that enable companies to sense and respond immediately to important events in their environments. This may seem wondrous and amazing but it will soon enough be the norm.

Gartner, a prominent research firm that focuses on business and technology, defines the idea of the real-time enterprise as an organization that "achieves competitive advantage by using up-to-date information to progressively remove delays in the management and execution of its critical business processes." Gartner goes on to point out that their definition has no explicit reference to technology. The reason for this is that the central concept of the real-time enterprise is not about technology, even though IT is the enabler that allows a company to become real-time. Instead, the central concept is about continuously improving key business processes and adapting them to changing circumstances so that they deliver better value to customers and more profit to the company.

The Pace of Change Continues to Accelerate

Let's take a quick look at the sequence of events that has brought about the real-time business world that is growing up around us. Since the start of the Industrial Revolution, the pace of change in business and the global economy has been steadily increasing. During the twentieth century several waves of innovation propelled the pace of change to move even faster. The introduction of the assembly line by Henry Ford and others in the early 1900s gave rise to the modern consumer society by delivering huge quantities of mass-produced items at prices that most people could afford.

As people became used to the availability of basic products such as cars, appliances, and clothes, they developed a demand for more specialized products with particular features that more closely met their needs and desires. Companies responded to this by defining market segments and developing a corporate structure in which separate divisions were created to focus on producing and selling products to each market segment. General Motors is a classic example of this. Instead of one company selling cars to a mass market, it became a collection of businesses selling different kinds of cars to different groups of customers. This structure became the model for business organizations everywhere.

Operations research techniques and continuing improvements in technology fueled a steady competitive race between companies during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. In the 1980s, Japanese companies like Toyota employed the techniques of lean manufacturing and changed the way manufacturing is organized and performed around the world. The production process got faster, more efficient, and more responsive.

During the 1990s, computer and communications technology developed to the point where the real-time organization started to move from theory to reality. Just as lean manufacturing changed the way manufacturing is done, the principles and practices of the real-time enterprise are starting to change the way companies are organized and how they operate.

In the last 20 years we have seen long-established manufacturing companies fade away because they were unable to successfully adopt lean manufacturing techniques and thus could no longer compete. In the next 20 years we will see other organizations fade away because they cannot make the transition to real time. Those organizations that do succeed in becoming real-time enterprises will need to change dramatically in the process.

This is a genuine wave of change, not just another IT fad. The real-time enterprise comes about through the use of IT but it is not about IT. The wealth-generation capabilities inherent in real-time operations are the major force that is driving this change. The switch over to real-time operations and the building of systems infrastructures to support this will be a major economic driver for the next several decades. This process has just begun and will accelerate as companies that become adept at real-time operations demonstrate the results that are possible from this way of operating.

What Does a Real-Time Enterprise Do?

A real-time organization is a company that has learned to operate in a continuously changing and coordinated manner with its suppliers and customers. A real-time organization receives, analyzes, and acts on a steady stream of information that describes its market environment and its internal operations. It is both constantly fine-tuning the efficiency of its internal operations and watching for and responding to new opportunities in the markets it serves.

Real-time enterprises are replacing the traditional Industrial Age organization that works on a monthly, quarterly, or yearly management cycle. Reaction times are too slow in those organizations. They follow management practices that arose from a time when most information traveled on paper, a cup of coffee cost a nickel, and the business world moved at a much slower pace.

The competitive playing field now requires that companies are more aware of their performance and their markets on a daily or even hourly basis so that they are able to maximize their internal operating efficiencies, spot new opportunities, and respond to them quickly. Real-time organizations enjoy significant competitive benefits such as:

Higher profits through better customer service. Many customers are busy and pressed for time and will pay a higher price to get faster and more convenient service. Companies that can deliver products quickly and introduce new or improved products in a timely manner will have an advantage.

Increased customer satisfaction. Faster and more responsive customer service creates more satisfied customers. Companies can be more attentive to the needs of their customers and respond with more relevant product and service offerings.

Reduced waste and inefficiency. Business processes in most companies can be run faster and more efficiently if they are reengineered to take advantage of new IT. These improvements can produce significant cost savings.

Improved management decisions. Managers with more timely and accurate information make better decisions. Companies can reduce their risks and get better operating results with real-time data.

It's All About Coordination

Those companies that are able to react quickly because of their real-time systems will have a competitive advantage. But merely reacting quickly to events is not enough. A company must also act in an appropriate and controlled manner. The proper combination of speed and control is what generates the coordination companies need. Speed without control is like stepping on the gas without being able to steer. That will only result in a crash.

Companies need to be careful not to speed up some processes without assessing the impact on other related operations. Speeding up one task only to throw other activities into confusion is counterproductive. Increased speed must be weighed against the increased costs involved. There is no point in taking speed to the level where the stability of a business process is degraded or a company's ability to control its risk is undermined.

Different areas of a company often have conflicting objectives. Inventory managers are motivated to reduce inventory. Salespeople are motivated to sell everything they can to customers. Credit people are motivated to prevent sales that could result in hard-to-collect or impossible-to-collect customer invoices. Senior management has to create complementary incentive plans for all these groups, and each group needs to understand enough about the others to effectively coordinate their interactions. This takes real effort to achieve.

Organizations need to keep several things in mind as they move into the real-time world. They should make sure that sound business strategy is what drives their efforts and not just the availability of new technology. They should redesign entire business processes before they begin applying IT. And they should set priorities so that they focus first on improving those processes that will deliver the most value to them and their customers.

A Day in the Life of an Agile Real-Time Company

To get a feel for what it is like to work in a real-time organization, let's imagine what a day in your life would be like. Last year you were promoted to Senior Vice President-North America for a large insurance company that sells insurance to businesses to cover their operating risks and related liabilities. You have put in place an ambitious plan to increase your market share in three targeted market segments. You have rolled out the plan to all your regional managers and the field sales force. People know what the big picture is and they know what their individual performance targets are within the plan. You are starting to see results that indicate the plan is working. But now is not the time to get complacent. You need to stay alert and respond effectively to events as they unfold.

The first thing you do each morning when you get to the office is open a window on the flat-screen display on your desk. The window shows a schematic diagram of operations in North America. Boxes in the diagram correspond to different parts of the business such as product sales, business operations, expenses, and revenue (see Exhibit 1.1). You call this window your dashboard because it shows you at a glance the status in key areas of your organization. The data that drives this display is updated continuously throughout the day so you can see what is happening as it occurs. This isn't a static report that is issued every month or every quarter.

This morning most of the boxes show up on the dashboard in green, indicating that actual results are tracking close to the plan. But you notice that one box-revenue-is glowing yellow. "Let's see what is going on here," you think as you click on this box. It opens up to show you the key indicators you have defined to monitor activity there. Two of the indicators you defined are showing in green, but the third indicator is yellow. This indicator is the new business win ratio and you think to yourself, "We aren't selling enough new business and the trend line is not getting better. If this keeps up for another couple of months, we will never make our annual sales target."

You click on the button for the new business win ratio and up comes a geographic display of the United States and Canada and their states and provinces. Five of the regions show up in green, but one region, the North Central, shows in yellow, and another, the Northeast, shows in red. "That's Carolyn's region," you think, "I need to give her a call."

Carolyn had gotten in early that morning. She poured herself a cup of coffee and opened the dashboard window on her display screen. Carolyn's dashboard has the same layout as your dashboard, but the data it displays is only for the Northeast region.

Continues...


Excerpted from Building the Real-Time Enterprise by Michael H. Hugos Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)