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Building Web Services with Java: Making Sense of XML, SOAP, WSDL and UDDI

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Building Web Services with SOAP, XML, and UDDI assumes proficiency with Java and with distributed computing tools. Throughout the book, examples will be presented using Java and the Apache SOAP platform, although a set of sidebars will address .NET development, which Microsoft developers will use to deploy Web services. The book uses progressive disclosure to present an increasingly complex project as it moves through its development cycle. The final section of the book presents linking the completed project with...
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Building Web Services with Java: Making Sense of XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI

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Overview

Building Web Services with SOAP, XML, and UDDI assumes proficiency with Java and with distributed computing tools. Throughout the book, examples will be presented using Java and the Apache SOAP platform, although a set of sidebars will address .NET development, which Microsoft developers will use to deploy Web services. The book uses progressive disclosure to present an increasingly complex project as it moves through its development cycle. The final section of the book presents linking the completed project with other systems built in J2EE and .NET.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780672321818
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 12/12/2001
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 581
  • Product dimensions: 7.39 (w) x 9.14 (h) x 1.36 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction 1
1 Web Services Overview 7
What Is a Web Service? 8
Business Perspective 10
Technical Perspective 11
The Web Service Opportunity 11
Enterprise Application Integration 11
B2B 12
Trends in e-business 14
Why Do We Need a Web Services Approach? 17
Scoping the Problem 17
Core Technologies 18
Industry Dynamics 19
Service-Oriented Architectures 23
Web Services Interoperability Stacks 25
The Wire Stack 26
The Description Stack 27
The Discovery Stack 30
Putting Together the Interoperability Stacks 31
Summary 32
2 XML Primer 33
Origins of XML 35
Document- Versus Data-Centric XML 37
Document-Centic XML 37
Data-Centric XML 38
Document Lifetime 39
XML Instances 40
Document Prolog 40
Elements 42
Attributes 44
Character Data 47
A Simpler Purchase Order 49
XML Namespaces 50
Namespace Mechanism 52
Namespace Syntax 53
Namespace-Prefixed Attributes 55
Document Type Definitions 57
Well-Formedness and Validity 57
Document Structure 58
Are DTDs Enough? 59
XML Schemas 60
XML Schema Basics 61
Associating Schemas with Documents 62
Simple Types 63
Complex types 67
The Purchase Order Schema 70
Basic Schema Reusability 73
Advanced Schema Reusability 79
There's More 88
Processing XML 88
Basic Operations 88
Data-Oriented XML Processing 90
SAX-based checkInvoice 94
DOM-based checkInvoice 100
Testing the Code 106
Summary 109
Resources 110
3 Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) 113
Evolution of XML Protocols 115
First-Generation XML Protocols 115
Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) 117
The Making of SOAP 117
What Should SOAP Do? 118
What Is SOAP, Really? 119
Doing Business with Skates Town 121
Interacting with the Inventory System 123
Inventory Check Web Service 125
Choosing a Web Service Engine 125
Service Provider View 126
Service Requestor View 127
Putting the Service to the Test 129
SOAP on the Wire 130
SOAP Envelope Framework 133
SOAP Envelope 133
SOAP Versioning 134
SOAP Headers 135
SOAP Body 137
Taking Advantage of SOAP Extensibility 137
Service Requestor View 137
Service Provider View 140
Putting the Service to the Test 143
SOAP on the Wire 144
SOAP Intermediaries 145
The Need for Intermediaries 145
Intermediaries in SOAP 146
Putting It All Together 147
Error Handling in SOAP 151
SOAP Message Processing 152
SOAP Data Encoding 153
Specifying Different Encodings 153
SOAP Data Encoding Rules 154
Choosing a Data Encoding 160
Architecting Distributed Systems with Web Services 166
Messaging 166
Messaging Versus RPC 171
SOAP-based RPCs 173
Purchase Order Submission Web Service 175
Purchase Order and Invoice Schemas 176
Service Requestor View 181
Service Provider View 183
Putting the Service to the Test 184
SOAP on the Wire 185
SOAP Protocol Bindings 187
General Considerations 187
HTTP/S 189
SOAP Messages with Attachments 190
SOAP over SMTP 191
Other Protocols 192
Summary 192
The Road Ahead 193
Resources 194
4 Creating Web Services 195
Why and What Is Axis? 196
The Axis Architecture 197
Axis Components 197
Locating the Service Chain 207
XML Parsing 208
Installing Axis 208
Configuring Axis 209
Configuration Methods 212
Security 214
Simple Web Services 215
Client-Side Programming 216
Advanced Web Service Deployment 219
Document-Centric Services 219
Data Encoding/Decoding 223
Building Handlers 225
Specialized Pivot Point Handlers, a.k.a. Providers 226
Faults 228
Message Patterns 229
Building and Deploying an Intermediary 229
SOAP V 1.2 230
Monitoring 230
Summary 232
5 Using SOAP for e-Business 233
Web Services Security 234
Example Scenario 236
SSL and HTTP Basic Authentication 236
Digital Signature 249
XML Encryption 255
Notary Service 260
Authorization 261
Security Assertions 265
Public Key Infrastructure and Key Management 267
How to Get Started with Security 272
Enterprise Application Integration 273
SOAP Server Based on J2EE 273
Transaction Processing 275
ACID and Two-Phase Commit 282
Reliable Messaging 289
J2EE Security Model 298
Quality of Service 301
Enterprise SOAP Server 302
High Availability 303
System Management 304
Enterprise Security 306
Summary 306
Resources 307
6 Describing Web Services 311
Why Service Descriptions? 312
Role of Service Description in a Service-Oriented Architecture 312
Well Defined Service 313
Functional Description 314
Non-Functional Description 315
Aggregation/Orchestration Description 316
Stack Summary 316
History of IDLs 317
Web Services Definition Language (WSDL) 321
WSDL Information Model 322
Elements of the WSDL Language 324
PortType 333
Operation 333
Message 338
Binding 342
Port 350
Service 350
Definitions 351
Documentation 352
Conventional Use of the Import Element 352
WSDL Extension Mechanism 355
WSDL and Java 358
Deriving Code from WSDL 358
Deriving WSDL from Code 382
Future Service Description Efforts 383
Web Services Endpoint Language (WSEL) 383
Web Services Flow Language (WSFL) 384
Summary 386
7 Discovering Web Services 387
The Role of Service Discovery 388
The Role of Registries 388
Service Discovery at Design Time and Runtime 389
Multiple Mechanisms of Service Discovery 390
Scenario Updates 392
UDDI 393
The UDDI Usage Model 394
The UDDI tModel Concept 403
Publishing Business Information to a UDDI Registry 419
Publishing Service Information to a UDDI Registry 426
Finding Information in a UDDI Registry 439
Getting Business and Service Details from a UDDI Registry 448
Summarizing UDDI Version 1.0 450
Private UDDI Registries 450
Why Would a Company Host a Private UDDI Registry? 450
Five Types of Private UDDI 452
What's New in UDDI Version 2.0? 457
Overview of Changes in UDDI V2.0 458
Third-Party Taxonomies 458
Modeling Relationships between businessEntity Entries 461
Changes to the Inquiry API 464
Changes to the Publication API 472
Miscellaneous Changes 474
Using WSDL with UDDI 477
Saving a UDDI businessService Based on WSDL 478
More Complex WSDL and Corresponding UDDI Entries 481
Putting It All Together: WSDL-Based UDDI and Dynamic Find 486
Summary 498
8 Interoperability, Tools, and Middleware Products 499
Interoperability: The "Holy Grail" of Web Services 500
The Soapbuilders Community 501
The Interoperability Lab 502
The W3C: The Emergence of a Standardized SOAP 503
The Larger Web Services Landscape 504
Who's Building SOAP Systems? 504
Other Languages and Environments 505
SOAP::Lite--Web Services in Perl 506
The .NET Web Service World: A Brief Primer 508
GLUE: Another Take on Java Web Services 516
Summary 519
Resources 519
9 Future Concepts 521
Computing as a Utility 522
Web Services Everywhere: The Vision 523
Ontologies and the Semantic Web 526
Resource Description Framework 527
Ontologies 528
Relating RDF to Web Services 529
Software Agents 529
Relating Software Agents to Web Services 530
Peer-to-Peer Computing 532
Relating Peer Computing to Web Services 533
Grid Computing 533
Relating Grid Computing to Web Services 534
Embedded Web Services 534
Pulling It All Together 535
Resources 536
Glossary 539
Index 557
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2004

    too heavy?

    [A review of the SECOND EDITION, 2004.] Web Services are this potential hot new field that has been built out with a lot of proposed standards. This book goes through them, with an emphasis on implementing applications in Java. The basic idea is a set of loosely coupled programs, scattered across a computer network, which invariably is the Internet or a private Internet. Loosely coupled means asynchronous, which then favours a nonblocking message passing approach, as opposed to a blocking RPC-type setup. The messages are sent as XML. Which is independent of platform and programming language. So the book shows how to use XML in WS. But these programs on the network need to find each other. So we have UDDI being explained in the book. A large part of the book is given over to how to describe a WS. A massive standard syntax has arisen, WSDL, which is expressed in XML. Like any other book on it, this conveys the sheer verbosity of WSDL. The industry bodies that built it tried to make it expressive enough for any plausible (though yet unimplemented) usage. The problem is that WSDL is now complex and hard to learn. It is not the book itself that is bloated, but what it faithfully describes. One might wonder. Is WSDL too heavy? Could it end up like X.400 and X.500? There are indeed implementations of these, but on only a few websites.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2002

    Put this in your library

    Great book with a broad coverage of web services and Java. Well worth the price. However, I need a bit more depth in many areas, more than what is provided in this book. With that said, it is still a good book.

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