Building with Nature: Inspiration for the Arts and Crafts Home

Building with Nature: Inspiration for the Arts and Crafts Home

by Leslie Freudenheim
     
 

This new edition of the classic, Building with Nature: Roots of the San Francisco Bay Region Tradition, focuses on the beginnings (1865 and on) of the Bay Area shingle style and Arts & Crafts collaboration in California, and the origins of the trend toward building simple rustic homes in harmony with nature. Freudenheim explores how and why a small, influential

Overview

This new edition of the classic, Building with Nature: Roots of the San Francisco Bay Region Tradition, focuses on the beginnings (1865 and on) of the Bay Area shingle style and Arts & Crafts collaboration in California, and the origins of the trend toward building simple rustic homes in harmony with nature. Freudenheim explores how and why a small, influential group of Californians (including Joseph Worcester, Bernard Maybeck, Charles Keeler, William Keith, Charles Lummis, A. Page Brown, and others)--all of whom had come from the East or from England--were especially devoted to Ruskin and the Arts & Crafts style and how this combined with their dedication to California's natural beauty to create a unique architectural movement.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781586854638
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
10/20/2005
Pages:
280
Product dimensions:
8.84(w) x 11.04(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Read an Excerpt

In 1967, when Elisabeth Sussman and I began our research into the sources of early California architecture, we joined a small group of pioneers whose work was effectively carving out a new field of American architectural history. Esther McCoy's groundbreaking Five California Architects, Harold Kirker's significant and classic California's Architectural Frontier, David Gebhard's exhibition catalogue Architecture in California 1868-1968, Sally Woodbridge's Buildings of the Bay Region Area, and Roger Olmsted and T. H. Watkins' Here Today-these became the seminal texts in the field. Their precursor, Elisabeth Kendall Thompson's significant article "The Early Domestic Architecture of the San Francisco Bay Region" (1951-52), turned out to be prophetic for us, as Thompson alerted us to the possibility that Reverend Joseph Worcester of the Swedenborgian Church in San Francisco may have played a major role in the architectural development of the region from 1876 to 1915.

It has been enormously gratifying to note the outpouring of further research in the field since we published Building with Nature: Roots of the San Francisco Bay Region Tradition in 1974. Numerous articles and books have advanced the impressive augmentation to our understanding of California's architecture and its role in the Arts & Crafts movement, moving a relatively obscure area of interest into the mainstream of American architectural, intellectual, and social history.

This book contains many new photographs that did not appear in the 1974 book, some of which have not been published since 1902. For example, we have included a view of Joseph Worcester's Russian Hill living room, showing the end with the bay windows that looked over the Golden Gate; Charles F. Lummis published the photograph with an incorrect caption (although he labeled the back of the photo itself properly) so that it remained unrecognized until William Kostura kindly drew my attention to it.

Meet the Author

Leslie Freudenheim is the coauthor of Building with Nature: Roots of the San Francisco Bay Region Tradition (Gibbs Smith, Publisher, 1974). Freudenheim has continued to work on architectural history and related areas, and has been published in the Baltimore Sun and the Washington Post. She also served as editor of Federal Design Matters for the Design Department, National Endowment for the Arts. Since 2002 she has returned to studying Arts & Crafts homes and the architectural and social roots of this movement.

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