Bulfinch's Mythology: The Age of Fable

Bulfinch's Mythology: The Age of Fable

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by Thomas Bulfinch
     
 

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Though this book came out in 1855 it still is one of the best introductions to mythology, and doesn't seem particularly dated. Though short, the myths retain much of the vitality they no doubt had when they flourished within archaic traditions. These are not ribald or gory versions, though. Most are elaborated with small genteel details, thus are more poetic than the

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Though this book came out in 1855 it still is one of the best introductions to mythology, and doesn't seem particularly dated. Though short, the myths retain much of the vitality they no doubt had when they flourished within archaic traditions. These are not ribald or gory versions, though. Most are elaborated with small genteel details, thus are more poetic than the drier offerings of Edith Hamilton' s book: MYTHOLOGY. Bulfinch generally gives a short explication after each fable, and often quotes stanzas of verse from such poets as Byron, Tennyson, Pope, Keats and Milton, who have elaborated upon the themes and give extra dimension to myths and/or mythic characters.

Bulfinch's versions are more tame and less inventive than those of Robert Graves in his: THE GREEK MYTHS, where accuracy is sometimes sacrificed for the sake of (peculiar) art. While it's interesting to note the differences between versions and to see how the personality of the writer leads to different emphasis or narrative flow, I prefer Bulfinch's more straightforward renditions.

It can be vaguely confusing that he uses the Latin names of the gods and goddesses more often than the Greek names: thus his Demeter is Ceres and his Persephone is Proserpina, etc. But the serious student will be familiar with these interchanges, and the casual reader will be able to sort them out with a little effort. There is an index of names in the back for easy reference.

The influence of these fables and myths on Western literature was enormous, and we are still culturally and psychologically indebted to them. These gods and goddesses, though endowed with extraordinary powers, were so human in their emotions, actions and ideas that we can't fail to recognize modern situations in their allegorical activities.

Myth was the carrier of traditional knowledge, moral injunction, natural and political history, as well as a forum for public opinion. Modern literature has taken on much of the role of ancient mythology, as universal themes have been brought into the personal realm via the novel or short story. But reading is vastly enhanced if we understand the sources of modern characters and the psychological motivations for their behaviors. These myths, though simply written, are still very useful in that regard

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"One of the most popular books ever published in the United States and the standard work on classical mythology for nearly a century"
— Carl J. Richard, The Battle for the American Mind

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781484818824
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
04/25/2013
Pages:
222
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.47(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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Bulfinch's Mythology

The Age of Fable
By Thomas Bulfinch

Doubleday Books

Copyright ©1990 Thomas Bulfinch
All right reserved.

ISBN: 1568650604


Excerpt


IF no other knowledge deserves to be called useful but that which helps to enlarge our possessions or to raise our station in society, then mythology has no claim to the appellation. But if that which tends to make us happier and better can be called useful then we claim that epithet for our subject. For mythology is the handmaid of literature; and literature is one of the best allies of virtue and promoters of happiness.

Without a knowledge of mythology much of the elegant literature of our own language cannot be understood and appreciated. When Byron calls Rome "the Niobe of nations," or says of Venice, "She looks a Sea-Cybele fresh from ocean," he calls up to the mind of one familiar with our subject, illustrations more vivid and striking than the pencil could furnish, but which are lost to the reader ignorant of mythology. Milton abounds in similar allusions. The short poem "Comus" contains more than thirty such, and the ode "On the Morning of the Nativity" half as many. Through "Paradise Lost" they are scattered profusely. This is one reason why we often hear persons by no means illiterate say that they cannot enjoy Milton. But were these persons to add to their more solid acquirements the easylearning of this little volume, much of the poetry of Milton which has appeared to them "harsh and crabbed" would be found "musical as is Apollo's lute." Our citations, taken from more than twenty-five poets, from Spenser to Longfellow, will show how general has been the practice of borrowing illustrations from mythology.

The prose writers also avail themselves of the same source of elegant and suggestive illustration. One can hardly take up a number of the "Edinburgh" or "Quarterly Review" without meeting with instances. In Macaulay's article on Milton there are twenty such.

But how is mythology to be taught to one who does not learn it through the medium of the languages of Greece and Rome? To devote study to a species of learning which relates wholly to false marvels and obsolete faiths is not to be expected of the general reader in a practical age like this. The time even of the young is claimed by so many sciences of facts and things that little can be spared for set treatises on a science of mere fancy.

But may not the requisite knowledge of the subject be acquired by reading the ancient poets in translations? We reply, the field is too extensive for a preparatory course; and these very translations require some previous knowledge of the subject to make them intelligible. Let any one who doubts it read the first page of the "Æneid," and see what he can make of "the hatred of Juno," the "decree of the Parcæ," the "judgment of Paris," and the "honours of Ganymede," without this knowledge.

Shall we be told that answers to such queries may be found in notes, or by a reference to the Classical Dictionary? We reply, the interruption of one's reading by either process is so annoying that most readers prefer to let an allusion pass unapprehended rather than submit to it. Moreover, such sources give us only the dry facts without any of the charm of the original narrative; and what is a poetical myth when stripped of its poetry? The story of Ceyx and Halcyone, which fills a chapter in our book, occupies but eight lines in the best (Smith's) Classical Dictionary; and so of others.

Our book is an attempt to solve this problem, by telling the stories of mythology in such a manner as to make them a source of amusement. We have endeavoured to tell them correctly, according to the ancient authorities, so that when the reader finds them referred to he may not be at a loss to recognize the reference. Thus we hope to teach mythology not as a study, but as a relaxation from study; to give our work the charm of a story-book, yet by means of it to impart a knowledge of an important branch of education. The index at the end will adapt it to the purposes of reference, and make it a Classical Dictionary for the parlour.

Most of the classical legends in this book are derived from Ovid and Virgil. They are not literally translated, for, in the author's opinion, poetry translated into literal prose is very unattractive reading. Neither are they in verse, as well for other reasons as from a conviction that to translate faithfully under all the embarrassments of rhyme and measure is impossible. The attempt has been made to tell the stories in prose, preserving so much of the poetry as resides in the thoughts and is separable from the language itself, and omitting those amplifications which are not suited to the altered form.

The Northern mythological stories are copied with some abridgement from Mallet's "Northern Antiquities." These chapters, with those on Oriental and Egyptian mythology, seemed necessary to complete the subject, though it is believed these topics have not usually been presented in the same volume with the classical fables.

The poetical citations so freely introduced are expected to answer several valuable purposes. They will tend to fix in memory the leading fact of each story, they will help to the attainment of a correct pronunciation of the proper names, and they will enrich the memory with many gems of poetry, some of them such as are most frequently quoted or alluded to in reading and conversation.

Having chosen mythology as connected with literature for our province, we have endeavoured to omit nothing which the reader of elegant literature is likely to find occasion for. Such stories and parts of stories as are offensive to pure taste and good morals are not given. But such stories are not often referred to, and if they occasionally should be, the English reader need feel no mortification in confessing his ignorance of them.

Our book is not for the learned, nor for the theologian, nor for the philosopher, but for the reader of English literature, of either sex, who wishes to comprehend the allusions so frequently made by public speakers, lecturers, essayists, and poets, and those which occur in polite conversation.

We trust our young readers will find it a source of entertainment; those more advanced a useful companion in their reading; those who travel, and visit museums and galleries of art, an interpreter of paintings and sculptures; those who mingle in cultivated society a key to allusions which are occasionally made; and last of all, those in advanced life pleasure in retracing a path of literature which leads them back to the days of their childhood, and revives at every step the associations of the morning of life.

The permanency of those associations is beautifully expressed in the well-known lines of Coleridge, in "The Piccolomini," Act ii, Scene 4:


"The intelligible forms of ancient poets,
The fair humanities of old religion,
The Power, the Beauty, and the Majesty
That had their haunts in dale or piny mountain,
Or forest, by slow stream, or pebbly spring,
Or chasms and watery depths; all these have vanished;
They live no longer in the faith of reason;
But still the heart doth need a language; still
Doth the old instinct bring back the old names;
Spirits or gods that used to share this earth
With man as with their friend; and at this day
'Tis Jupiter who brings whate'er is great,
And Venus who brings every thing that's fair."


Continues...

Excerpted from Bulfinch's Mythology by Thomas Bulfinch Copyright ©1990 by Thomas Bulfinch. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Thomas Bulfinch (1796–1867) was a Massachusetts-based writer and banker who wrote and collected the first popular English-language retellings of Greek, Roman, Eastern, Scandinavian, Arthurian, and medieval myths.

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Bulfinch's Mythology: The Age of Fable 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
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A great collection of myths and stories, well worth a read. Really held my attention.
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Written by jules older illustrated by Megan halsey