Bulletproof Buddhists and Other Essays

Overview

Frank Chin is perhaps the most instantly recognizable voice in Chinese American writing today. A self-proclaimed "transcendent Chinaman pagan heathen barbarian," Chin searches out (or stumbles on) the right people and situations, vividly recording the outcome in distinctively American terms. Here are six of his best essays, spanning the past forty years. Making his way across the U.S. to Cuba, Chin is arrested as an American spy some time between Castro's revolution and the missile crisis. He meets Ben Fee, the ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (18) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $1.99   
  • Used (15) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$1.99
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(2355)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
0824819594 New Condition. Ships immediately.

Ships from: Lindenhurst, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(1644)

Condition: New
1997-07-01 Paperback New 0824819594 New Condition. Ships immediately.

Ships from: plainview, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$36.44
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(345)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Frank Chin is perhaps the most instantly recognizable voice in Chinese American writing today. A self-proclaimed "transcendent Chinaman pagan heathen barbarian," Chin searches out (or stumbles on) the right people and situations, vividly recording the outcome in distinctively American terms. Here are six of his best essays, spanning the past forty years. Making his way across the U.S. to Cuba, Chin is arrested as an American spy some time between Castro's revolution and the missile crisis. He meets Ben Fee, the man who integrated San Francisco, and is introduced to Southeast Asian gangs and culture in San Diego. He discovers Chinese bachelor society along the California-Mexico border and travels to Singapore, where he speculates on the fear and suppression of Chinese culture among Chinese Singaporeans. Back at the home front, he encounters the new white racism along Interstate 5 during the Gulf War.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Whether he is writing about a trip to Cuba he took as a student during the 1960s, his visits with the inhabitants of the Chinatowns along the California-Baja California border, interviews with a white police officer in San Diego who has succeeded in reducing tensions between Cambodian and Laotian youth gangs there or his experiences at a writers' conference in Singapore, Chin tends to portray everyone, and everything, in this collection of six essays, in terms of race, ethnicity and cultural stereotypes. Chin heaps scorn not only on whites (Anglos) but also on Asians in Singapore (a city whose culture he disdains), and especially on Chinese American writers whom Chin accuses of having sold out to white American culture and values. Waving about classic texts, in particular Sun Tzu's The Art of War, he denigrates those who like Maxine Hong Kingston and Amy Tan. "They like the idea of falsifying Chinese culture in the name of art and Westernization. They are admitted and joyous white supremacists." Throughout, Chin, who prefers to be referred to as a Chinaman rather than a Chinese American, makes references to being someone without "a sense of home." The problems of the ethnically displaced and the merits of cultural diversity versus assimilation are important issues. The tone of Chin's arguments against the desirability and possibility of assimilation is emotional rather than intellectual, bitterly accusatory rather than rational. Unfortunately that will probably limit his book to preachifying to the converted. (July)
Library Journal
Of these six essays, four discuss the Asian experience, particularly that of the Chinese in California; the other two discuss the author's trip to Cuba in 1962 and impressions of Singapore on a trip to a writers' conference in 1994. The personal stories of Asian gangs and those of early, hard-working immigrants have a resounding poignancy, especially since many are drawn from interviews. Yet the rantings about various topics (bigotry, storytelling, Chinese American authors, stereotyping, Singapore, malls, etc.) often seem mean-spirited and incomplete. In addition, they are often dated: who thinks of Chinese as Charlie Chan and Fu Manchu types these days? Chin, author of the novel Donald Duk (Coffee House, 1991) and the play The Chickencoop Chinaman, among other works, has a hip, fluent, fast-paced style, but we look forward to his next novel, not his essays.Kitty Chen Dean, Nassau Coll., Garden City, NY
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780824819590
  • Publisher: University of Hawaii Press, The
  • Publication date: 5/15/1998
  • Series: Intersections Series
  • Pages: 438
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 5.40 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Table of Contents

I Am Talking to the Strategist Sun Tzu about Life When the Subject of War Comes Up 1
Confessions of a Chinatown Cowboy 63
Bulletproof Buddhists 111
Lowe Hoy and the Strange Three-Legged Toad 199
A Chinaman in Singapore 329
Pidgin Contest along I-5 413
Editor's Note 431
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)