Bullfighting: Stories

Bullfighting: Stories

4.3 3
by Roddy Doyle
     
 

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"[No one] can match Doyle for the fluency with which he tacks back and forth between the hilarious and the heartbreaking." —The New York Times Book Review

Roddy Doyle has won acclaim for his wry wit, his uncanny ear, and his remarkable ability to fully capture the voices and hearts of his characters. Bullfighting, his second

Overview

"[No one] can match Doyle for the fluency with which he tacks back and forth between the hilarious and the heartbreaking." —The New York Times Book Review

Roddy Doyle has won acclaim for his wry wit, his uncanny ear, and his remarkable ability to fully capture the voices and hearts of his characters. Bullfighting, his second collection of stories, offers a series of bittersweet takes on men and middle age, revealing a panorama of Ireland today. Moving from classrooms to graveyards, from local pubs to bullrings, these tales of taking stock and reliving past glories feature men concerned with loss—of their place in the world, of their power, virility, health, and ability to love.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Man Booker Prize winner for Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, Doyle here offers his second collection of short stories, which presents a panorama of contemporary Ireland by presenting ordinary men making their ordinary way through life. Eight of the 13 stories appeared previously in The New Yorker. Roddy Doyle rah rah rah; get for all smart readers.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780143121060
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/29/2012
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.60(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Roddy Doyle is an internationally bestselling writer. His first three novels—The Commitments, The Snapper, and the 1991 Booker Prize finalist The Van—are known as The Barrytown Trilogy. He is also the author of the novels Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha (1993 Booker Prize winner), The Woman Who Walked into Doors, and A Star Called Henry, and a non-fiction book about his parents, Rory & Ita. Doyle has also written for the stage and the screen: the plays Brownbread, War, Guess Who's Coming for the Dinner, and The Woman Who Walked Into Doors; the film adaptations of The Commitments )as co-writer), The Snapper, and The Van; When Brendan Met Trudy (an original screenplay); the four-part television series Family for the BBC; and the television play Hell for Leather. Roddy Doyle has also written the children's books The Giggler Treatment, Rover Saves Christmas, and The Meanwhile Adventures and contributed to a variety of publications including The New Yorker magazine and several anthologies. He lives in Dublin.

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Bullfighting 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ZyskoKid More than 1 year ago
You can breeze through this collection of Roddy Doyle short stories, but why not take your time with each and savor the flavor of Dublin today. I love how Doyle has matured in his subject matter but kept his writing style. You can almost imagine the boys from "The Commitments" are grown up and facing the challenges of middle-age and beyond. "Bullfighting" has some funny, funny dialogue between husbands and wives and the kind of banter between pals that will make you think Doyle sat at a bar recording conversations you and your friends might have had, with an Irish twist, of course. While the humor is the foam rising to the top of Doyle's literary brew, there's the dark of a Guinness underlying the stories. Loneliness, second-guessing one's life choices, feeling of no value, wondering about loving -- and especially fear about not being loved back. Doyle also doesn't sugarcoat Ireland's unemployment problem; it's a recurring trait of his characters. But the somber or melancholy tones are blended so nicely with the comedic slice-of-life vignettes that readers -- like Doyle's middle-aged men -- tend to push the worries aside to laugh. And anyone who's ever buried a family pet will love the story titled "Animals." Catch this excerpt: "The animals always had decent, elaborate burials. Christian, Hindu, Humanist -- whatever bits of knowledge and sh*** the kids brought home from school went into the funerals. George changed mobile phones, not because he really wanted to, but because he knew the boxes would come in handy - it was always wise to have a coffin ready for the next dead bird or fish." The whole story is just as funny, but the magic that Doyle saves for the end of "Animals" is worth the price of the entire book.