Bullfrog Pops!

Bullfrog Pops!

by Rick Walton, Chris McAllister
     
 

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Last seen hopping a stage . . . (coach) and finding his hop in Once There was a Bull . . . (frog), our hero is now on an eye-popping eating binge trying to cure his insatiable appetite. Woven through the western town of Ravenous Gulch, the story leaves a cast of many hopping mad. However, just as things look bleak, transitive and intransitive verbs turn the tables

Overview

Last seen hopping a stage . . . (coach) and finding his hop in Once There was a Bull . . . (frog), our hero is now on an eye-popping eating binge trying to cure his insatiable appetite. Woven through the western town of Ravenous Gulch, the story leaves a cast of many hopping mad. However, just as things look bleak, transitive and intransitive verbs turn the tables and take Bullfrog on another adventure. Part of Rick Walton's tremendously successful Language Arts series.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Carol Raker Collins
Bullfrog eats his way through Ravenous Gulch in a cliffhanger page-turning tale. Through the witty use of verbs that change from intransitive to transitive, the story alters its meanings in surprising ways. The clever illustrations carry out this trick. For example, after stealing a pizza from Starvin' Marvin, "Bullfrog tried to hide . . . [page ends] the pizza." The page ending in ". . ." shows Bullfrog in what looks like dense dark grass with the pizza flipped over his head; but as the page turns, we see that Bullfrog is actually on top of a bull's head and the pizza is supported by the bull's horns. So the adventure continues with Bullfrog chased by many townsfolk whose food he has eaten until they decide he would make a good candidate for the County Super Eater Contest. They test his limits by feeding him even more food until his body looks as if it's about to burst. The last food he's handed is a bunch of grapes: "And then, Bullfrog POPPED . . ." Children should enjoy the picture book and come to an intuitive understanding of the verb game. It's the kind of book that bears many rereadings.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-A hungry amphibian eats his way through Ravenous Gulch and is pursued by all of the townspeople. Walton creates suspense by a clever use of vocabulary and layout. Most double-page spreads end with a verb in bold print that changes its meaning on the following page. For example, readers would expect the frog to have fled the scene after reading, "Bullfrog dashed-," but the completion of the sentence on the following page-"-the watermelon to the ground" proves differently. Illustrations are contained within bright, bold, desert-hued squares surrounded by white margins. The comical Bullfrog is seen running off with a large watermelon and again as he is cornered against an apple tree trunk. Typeface for the text is made up of unusual curlicues on most every letter with an uneven baseline that could make reading difficult for new readers but adds to the sense of rapid movement through the story. Supplemental fare.-Blair Christolon, Prince William Public Library System, Manassas, VA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Some amusing plays on words, and a keen device for keeping little hands turning pages doesn't quite succeed in this picture book from Walton (So Many Bunnies, 1998, etc.). Bullfrog heads for Ravenous Gulch, and he sure is hungry when he gets there. He swipes a pizza from Starvin' Marvin, picks a watermelon, steals bread from a bakery, takes apples from a tree, and finally ends up in Ravenous Gulch's Fine Groceries, Fine Dining, and Fine Art Emporium where he eats everything in sight with such enthusiasm that he knocks the pictures from the walls. Bullfrog finds salvation, though, when the townsfolk realize they have a contender for the County Super Eater Contest. Most pages end with a word in boldface; its meaning changes with the turn of the page, e.g., the bullfrog "bolts" on one page, implying that he's hopping away, but the next page reveals that what he bolts is "the door shut." The action appears on square paintings offset by white borders and full of skewed perspectives. The images combined with the squiggly, hard-to-decipher typeface will make this hard on newer readers, but they might appreciate the language: "Stop eatin' my apples, you canyon-mouthed fruit catcher!" (Picture book. 6-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781586858407
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
08/22/2005
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 10.50(h) x 0.16(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

Once there was a bullfrog who hopped...a stagecoach and rode far away. After many miles he came to the town of Ravenous Gulch.

Bullfrog was hot. He was dirty. He had not showered in many days. And he smelled...PIZZA! Bullfrog was HUNGRY! All he'd eaten for days was one horsefly.

Meet the Author

Rick Walton is the author of dozens of books for kids, including his popular books introducing language arts concepts: Once There Was a Bullfrog, Why the Banana Split, and Herd of Cows Flock of Sheep. He often plays his guitar happily. Rick and his family live in Provo, Utah. For more info visit www.rickwalton.com

Chris McAllister has been a freelance illustrator for fifteen years. He and his wife, Maureen live happily in the Norgwoods of Minnesota with their family.

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