Bulls Island

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Overview

A satisfying tale of honor, chance, and star-crossed love infused with Southern wit, grace, and charm from the New York Times bestselling author Dorothea Benton Frank

After twenty years, Elizabeth "Betts" McGee has finally managed to put her past behind her. She hasn't been home to beautiful South Carolina and untouched Bulls Island since the tragic night that ended her engagement to Charleston's golden boy, J. D. Langley.

And why is that? ...

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2008 Hardcover New This book is new. "Bulls Island" is a satisfying tale of honor, chance, and star-crossed love, infused with Southern wit, grace, and charm from the "New York ... Times" bestselling author of "The Christmas Pearl" and "The Land of Mango Sunsets." Read more Show Less

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Overview

A satisfying tale of honor, chance, and star-crossed love infused with Southern wit, grace, and charm from the New York Times bestselling author Dorothea Benton Frank

After twenty years, Elizabeth "Betts" McGee has finally managed to put her past behind her. She hasn't been home to beautiful South Carolina and untouched Bulls Island since the tragic night that ended her engagement to Charleston's golden boy, J. D. Langley.

And why is that? Really, this is the story of two old Southern families. The Langley family has more money than the Morgan Stanley Bank. And they think they have more class. The Barrett family made their nineteenth-century fortune in a less distinguished manner—corner grocery stores and liquor stores. It's no surprise that when J.D. and Betts fall in love and decide to marry their parents are none too pleased. And when the love affair comes to an end, everyone is ready to place blame.

Now twenty years have gone by and Betts, a top investment bank executive, must leave her comfortable life in New York City to return to the home she thought she'd left behind forever. But spearheading the most important project of her career puts her back in contact with everything she's tried so hard to forget: her estranged sister, her father, J.D., and her past.

Once she's home, can Betts keep the secret that threatens all she holds dear? Or will her fear of the past wreck her future happiness? And what about that crazy gator? All will be revealed on Bulls Island.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Will romance triumph over the feud between the aristocratic Langleys and the slightly lower-in-social-pecking-order McGees in Frank's latest Southern charm-filled romp? Though the answer is obvious from the get-go, the author fills this spirited tale with well-drawn characters, not the least of whom is formidable Charleston doyenne Louisa Langley. Betts McGee and J.D. Langley are uneasily headed to the altar-Louisa has a hard time with her son dating down. When Betts's mother dies in a car wreck, a generations-old grudge-abetted by Louisa-flares up, and Betts flees to Manhattan. There, she raises her son (J.D. didn't know she was pregnant when she left) solo and thrives in the distressed property turn-around business for a good 20 years until an assignment sends her back to Charleston to help develop a former wildlife refuge. The local partner in the venture is none other than J.D., who is now unhappily married and childless. Frank steers through several terrains with great aplomb as the story unfolds from both Betts's and J.D.'s points of view. Frank shines as Betts finds out if there's really no place like home. (May)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061438431
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/8/2008
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Dorothea Benton Frank

New York Times bestselling author Dorothea Benton Frank was born and raised on Sullivans Island, South Carolina. She divides her time between the New York area and the Lowcountry.

Biography

An author who has helped to put the South Carolina Lowcountry on the literary map, Dorothea Benton Frank hasn't always lived near the ocean, but the Sullivan's Island native has a powerful sense of connection to her birthplace. Even after marrying a New Yorker and settling in New Jersey, she returned to South Carolina regularly for visits, until her mother died and she and her siblings had to sell their family home. "It was very upsetting," she told the Raleigh News & Observer. "Suddenly, I couldn't come back and walk into my mother's house. I was grieving."

After her mother's death, writing down her memories of home was a private, therapeutic act for Frank. But as her stack of computer printouts grew, she began to try to shape them into a novel. Eventually a friend introduced her to the novelist Fern Michaels, who helped her polish her manuscript and find an agent for it.

Published in 2000, Frank's first "Lowcountry tale," Sullivan's Island made it to the New York Times bestseller list. Its quirky characters and tangled family relationships drew comparisons to the works of fellow southerners Anne Rivers Siddons and Pat Conroy (both of whom have provided blurbs for Frank's books). But while Conroy's novels are heavily angst-ridden, Frank sweetens her dysfunctional family tea with humor and a gabby, just-between-us-girls tone. To her way of thinking, there's a gap between serious literary fiction and standard beach-blanket fare that needs to be filled.

"I don't always want to read serious fiction," Frank explained to The Sun News of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. "But when I read fiction that's not serious, I don't want to read brain candy. Entertain me, for God's sake." Since her debut, she has faithfully followed her own advice, entertaining thousands of readers with books Pat Conroy calls "hilarious and wise" and characters Booklist describes as "sassy and smart,."

These days, Frank has a house of her own on Sullivan's Island, where she spends part of each year. "The first thing I do when I get there is take a walk on the beach," she admits. Evidently, this transplanted Lowcountry gal is staying in touch with her soul.

Good To Know

Before she started writing, Frank worked as a fashion buyer in New York City. She is also a nationally recognized volunteer fundraiser for the arts and education, and an advocate of literacy programs and women's issues.

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Read an Excerpt

Bulls Island LP

Chapter One

Meet Betts

Trouble. In the charcoal shadows that delivered dawn to day in my Manhattan apartment, trouble lurked like a horrible thief. It would snatch my guilty life out of my pocket. I could sense but not pinpoint the exact location. It did not matter. Trouble would get me anyway. Trouble so practiced and seasoned that I would never know its clammy hand, each fingertip as light as feathers had been there mocking me the whole way to ruination. Except for one telling detail. Before I threw back my bedcovers, before I even glanced at my alarm clock, my left eyelid had begun to twitch in earnest. Always a redoubtable warning of approaching and certain disaster. My heart pounded. Was it a dream?

Moments later, real life began again. My cell phone rang and vibrated against the blond wood of my bedside table. It was my secretary, Sandi, calling to say Ben Bruton wanted to see me that morning. Wonderful. I was to begin my day with an audience with the Great and Terrible Oz. Not to mention I had a scheduled meeting later that morning with a gaggle offast-talking suits from Tokyo.

Swell. No one at my level was called to see Bruton unless he wanted you dead and out of his life—or your status was to improve vastly. I had no reason to fear for my position and no reason to believe I was in line for anything except to continue what I had been doing for the past four years—evaluating and restructuring the distressed properties in our portfolio. Sounds boring? Anything but. Trust me.

I was late, which was unusual. Normally, I'm up at six. My nerves got in between me and everything I hadto do. As I dressed, I pushed my toe through an expensive pair of Wolford panty hose, jabbed my eyeliner into the white of my eye, spilled tea on my shirt, on and on it went until I finally got out the door.

I rushed the nine and one-half blocks from Park and Sixty-first to work dodging traffic, juggling my Tazo chai, my handbag, the Wall Street Journal, and my briefcase. Click, click, click. The heels of my Prada pumps clicked and echoed in my ears as I hurried across the rose-colored, gold-speckled granite floor of the lobby. In my peripheral vision, I spotted Dennis Baker swinging into action, moving toward me like a PI, knowing he had caught my eye.

Why was he always following me? He made my skin crawl. I slipped into an empty elevator, his arm caught the closing door, and I was trapped.

"You look great today. New dress?" he said, exuding enough testosterone to impregnate every female in the five boroughs of New York City.

Except me.

"Thank you." I avoided eye contact and his question.

He leaned against the opposite wall, put his hands in his pockets, and struggled to look adorable. "So, let me ask you something, McGee."

"What?"

"Why aren't you committed to someone who could, you know, see about all your needs? Too risky to get involved?"

"It's not about money, Dennis," I said, looking directly at him without a shred of warmth. "It's about my survival. And since when is my life your business?"

Disbelieving, Dennis Baker's obnoxious eyes surveyed me as though he could not imagine what I struggled to overcome. In his opinion I had no problems because money was the great cure-all. As if I was rolling in it. Would that it were so.

"I've been watching you. And . . . just curious, I guess." Next, with what I'm sure he deemed considerable insight, he said, "Well then, it must be about power. Why you work so hard and why you're such a loner? A relationship might distract your focus and therefore dilute your power. Am I right?"

"Nooooo," I said, assuring him that I had no interest in chatting with him for the minute it took us to rise from the thirty-eighth-floor lobby to the seventieth floor. Any and all conversation with him was exasperating. I stood rooted to my side of the elevator and stared up at the rapidly changing red digital trailer of weather and news.

I said to myself, no, itwasn't about power. It actually was all about survival. Was it easy for a woman to make it in this business? No. You had to be twice as right, twice as qualified, and twice as anything else the assignment required.

Relieved when the doors opened, I left him to slither back to his cubicle on the sixty-eighth floor.

"Have a great day," he said.

"See ya." I said. Loser.

Dennis was like a swarm of gnats at dusk, annoying and confident that he would eventually get to you. He was fortunate that I had not reported him to human resources for sexual harassment and that I spoke to him at all.

Dennis Baker was one of a dozen male and female secretaries with a degree in chiropractic medicine, culinary arts, or medieval literature who hunted the halls like a hungry animal, searching for prey, married or single, with a mid-seven-figure income that could give them a life of ease. Married with children didn't bother them one iota. And they seemed unaware of a greater truth, which was this: Why would anyone of actual significance be interested in anyone so pathetically amoral? Even the occasional drunk partner or lonely associate knew the difference between a sporting screw and a relationship that could cost them a marriage and, not to be overlooked, a painful division of assets. Dennis Baker was a stellar bartender and amateur sommelier, hence his longevity at the firm.

But back to the more important issue. I had been summoned to Ben Bruton's office, or rather I should say the real estate he occupied in the penthouse of the five floors we owned on Fifty-second and Fifth. When his gatekeeper, Darlene, spotted me, she smiled and pressed the button to his inner sanctum, whispering the news of my arrival as though we were gathered in an ICU with a priest. I sat in the waiting area and then got up to pace. What did Bruton want? I was nervous.

Bulls Island LP. Copyright © by Dorothea Frank. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Bulls Island

Chapter One

Meet Betts

Trouble. In the charcoal shadows that delivered dawn to day in my Manhattan apartment, trouble lurked like a horrible thief. It would snatch my guilty life out of my pocket. I could sense but not pinpoint the exact location. It did not matter. Trouble would get me anyway. Trouble so practiced and seasoned that I would never know its clammy hand, each fingertip as light as feathers had been there mocking me the whole way to ruination. Except for one telling detail. Before I threw back my bedcovers, before I even glanced at my alarm clock, my left eyelid had begun to twitch in earnest. Always a redoubtable warning of approaching and certain disaster. My heart pounded. Was it a dream?

Moments later, real life began again. My cell phone rang and vibrated against the blond wood of my bedside table. It was my secretary, Sandi, calling to say Ben Bruton wanted to see me that morning. Wonderful. I was to begin my day with an audience with the Great and Terrible Oz. Not to mention I had a scheduled meeting later that morning with a gaggle offast-talking suits from Tokyo.

Swell. No one at my level was called to see Bruton unless he wanted you dead and out of his life—or your status was to improve vastly. I had no reason to fear for my position and no reason to believe I was in line for anything except to continue what I had been doing for the past four years—evaluating and restructuring the distressed properties in our portfolio. Sounds boring? Anything but. Trust me.

I was late, which was unusual. Normally, I'm up at six. My nerves got in between me and everything I hadto do. As I dressed, I pushed my toe through an expensive pair of Wolford panty hose, jabbed my eyeliner into the white of my eye, spilled tea on my shirt, on and on it went until I finally got out the door.

I rushed the nine and one-half blocks from Park and Sixty-first to work dodging traffic, juggling my Tazo chai, my handbag, the Wall Street Journal, and my briefcase. Click, click, click. The heels of my Prada pumps clicked and echoed in my ears as I hurried across the rose-colored, gold-speckled granite floor of the lobby. In my peripheral vision, I spotted Dennis Baker swinging into action, moving toward me like a PI, knowing he had caught my eye.

Why was he always following me? He made my skin crawl. I slipped into an empty elevator, his arm caught the closing door, and I was trapped.

"You look great today. New dress?" he said, exuding enough testosterone to impregnate every female in the five boroughs of New York City.

Except me.

"Thank you." I avoided eye contact and his question.

He leaned against the opposite wall, put his hands in his pockets, and struggled to look adorable. "So, let me ask you something, McGee."

"What?"

"Why aren't you committed to someone who could, you know, see about all your needs? Too risky to get involved?"

"It's not about money, Dennis," I said, looking directly at him without a shred of warmth. "It's about my survival. And since when is my life your business?"

Disbelieving, Dennis Baker's obnoxious eyes surveyed me as though he could not imagine what I struggled to overcome. In his opinion I had no problems because money was the great cure-all. As if I was rolling in it. Would that it were so.

"I've been watching you. And . . . just curious, I guess." Next, with what I'm sure he deemed considerable insight, he said, "Well then, it must be about power. Why you work so hard and why you're such a loner? A relationship might distract your focus and therefore dilute your power. Am I right?"

"Nooooo," I said, assuring him that I had no interest in chatting with him for the minute it took us to rise from the thirty-eighth-floor lobby to the seventieth floor. Any and all conversation with him was exasperating. I stood rooted to my side of the elevator and stared up at the rapidly changing red digital trailer of weather and news.

I said to myself, no, itwasn't about power. It actually was all about survival. Was it easy for a woman to make it in this business? No. You had to be twice as right, twice as qualified, and twice as anything else the assignment required.

Relieved when the doors opened, I left him to slither back to his cubicle on the sixty-eighth floor.

"Have a great day," he said.

"See ya." I said. Loser.

Dennis was like a swarm of gnats at dusk, annoying and confident that he would eventually get to you. He was fortunate that I had not reported him to human resources for sexual harassment and that I spoke to him at all.

Dennis Baker was one of a dozen male and female secretaries with a degree in chiropractic medicine, culinary arts, or medieval literature who hunted the halls like a hungry animal, searching for prey, married or single, with a mid-seven-figure income that could give them a life of ease. Married with children didn't bother them one iota. And they seemed unaware of a greater truth, which was this: Why would anyone of actual significance be interested in anyone so pathetically amoral? Even the occasional drunk partner or lonely associate knew the difference between a sporting screw and a relationship that could cost them a marriage and, not to be overlooked, a painful division of assets. Dennis Baker was a stellar bartender and amateur sommelier, hence his longevity at the firm.

But back to the more important issue. I had been summoned to Ben Bruton's office, or rather I should say the real estate he occupied in the penthouse of the five floors we owned on Fifty-second and Fifth. When his gatekeeper, Darlene, spotted me, she smiled and pressed the button to his inner sanctum, whispering the news of my arrival as though we were gathered in an ICU with a priest. I sat in the waiting area and then got up to pace. What did Bruton want? I was nervous.

Bulls Island. Copyright © by Dorothea Frank. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 78 )
Rating Distribution

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(35)

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(12)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 80 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 25, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    You never escape your past.

    We all have some kiind of skeltons in our closets. Dorothea Benton Frank has given us the story of one of us with such skeltons. Her characters are vivid and believable. I was pulling for the main character to survive her trip back into her past and the repercussions this involved. Dorothea reminded us that we all do what we have to do to survive and begin again. But someday, we must face our past in order to make peace and a better future. This book was an excellent read

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2009

    Wonderful story telling. The book makes you feel a part of the Island life.

    Bulls Island, like the rest of Dorothea Benton Frank's books, Make you feel like you are part of the island / Charleston life. Not only does she deal with today but she brings out the history in her people and how it shapes their lives.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Really, really good - almost great

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book, as I have most of Ms. Frank's novels. Somehow I'd missed it, and found my way to it after reading Return to Sullivan's Island. Ms. Frank's protagonists are warm and compelling and she has an authentic South Carolina voice that resonates with those of us who live away from home (I also go back and forth between New York and the Lowcountry). I found Bulls Island one of her best books - in fact, I've read it more than once in a short time. The love story is genuine, heartfelt, and bittersweet, and the ending, even if expected, is very satisfying. Ms. Frank's reasoned take on balancing development and environmental issues (also a theme in her novel Shem Creek) is well-thought-out and refreshing. But - all that said - some elements trouble me. First, no Southerner I know, of any racial background, calls his or her mother 'Momma', as do all the characters in Ms. Frank's books. The time-honored name, and its spelling, is 'Mama' - a word held dear to the hearts of Southerners, black and white, across many generations. And certainly no educated Southerner (as Betts and J.D. are) goes around saying 'yo momma' (especially in Charleston, of all places). Why inject ghetto-speak where it has no authentic usage? Gullah is a beautiful language, and one of which Ms. Frank has some command; hip-hop is something else entirely. I can't help but feel that this is either pandering by Ms. Frank or an imposition by her editors to make Southerners seem somehow 'cool'. We're plenty cool enough, thank you. I also find Ms. Frank and/or her editors to be careless - she says toward the end of the book that she's spent 'six months agonizing' when the time elapsed between late September and Christmas is barely three months. That's not atypical of editorial glitches in her books. But most jarring, in Bulls Island, is her attitude toward infertility, which is cavalier and insensitive to readers who have wrestled with this issue. There's no question that this book ends exactly as it should - but to imply that infertility is even remotely an excuse for divorce is shocking (I can't believe the editors allowed the use of the term 'barren womb' - shades of Henry the Eighth here?). Nor does infertility excuse drunkenness and drug addiction, however difficult the struggle to conceive may be. Valerie is thoroughly unlikeable, but to mingle her innate character flaws with her infertility is a poor choice on Ms. Frank's part. It also detracts from J.D. and Betts, who are both honorable, principled people - the fact that they refrain from an extramarital affair is impressive, considering that readers love titillating bedroom scenes, and Ms. Frank doesn't give them one. The overarching message of this book is love and reconciliation, and it's a wonderful story - but it could have been even better with a little more care.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 2, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Real People dealing with real life written by an excellent author

    All of Dorthea Benton Frank's books are a must read for me since I stumbled on to them a couple of years ago. I enjoy the information that she includes about the area where the story is set - it makes me feel as though I am right there. I appreciate her characters - they are never too quirky, nor are they too bland.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 25, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Bull's Island is no bull!

    Dorothea Benton Frank has done it again! She creates a world that draws you in. I'm a BIG fan & have read most of her books. If you've ever visited Charleston, you will fall in love with Frank's writings. If you've never been to Charleston..........what are you waiting for!!!!! The low country is just waitin' for ya'll!!!
    Great summer escapism.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2008

    Bull's Island

    I've read about 1/3 of this book, and can hardly put it down. It just gets better with each page I turn. Dot Franke always delivers. I eagerly await her next and her next and her next.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2008

    THE BEST YET!!!

    I loved this book! I have read all of her books and think this one is the best. The characters are wonderful and real! I am a Charleston native and can absolutely see and feel the whole story! I am a semi-slow reader - and I finished the book in one week. It's a great beach read! It is laugh out loud funny! Looking forward to a new book! Please buy and enjoy!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2008

    My first visit with this author, but NOT my last!

    I have to admit, even though I knew how this would probably turn out, I still could not put the book down! I read it in 2 days because I had to find out if I was right or not. There were some surprises. Excellent summer read

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2008

    Avid Reader in Texas

    One of Frank's best and I have read them all. This one does not disappoint. The characters continue to live with you after you finish the book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2008

    Need more depth

    This is a light read...interesting concept, okay to read, but really could've used more depth in the characters. The characters SOUNDED interesting... but they needed more interaction to make them truly come to life. It was like the author did a quick brush over for the characters, when I really was curious and wanted to know more... almost like she didn't want to write that much. I did find some of the writing to be amateurish---like when one character died, she explained that another character was 'white as a cadaver'...odd connection to make, I thought. There was great potential there for a heart-wrenching love story, but it ended up limited--almost like the writer didn't know how to write the detail that would touch your soul.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2008

    Great Book!!

    Bulls Island is one of the best books i have ever ready!! I think anyone who lives in SC should read this book!! It took me 2 days to read this book because I could NOT put it down!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2008

    Wonderful book about the costs of secrets and lies in one southern family.

    Bulls Island by Dorothea Benton Frank I'm not a 'professional reviewer', I'm just a very avid reader, so please keep this in mind when you read this review. A very brief summary of this book - The main characters of this book are 'Betts' McGee and J D Langley who, when we meet them 19 years ago are very young and very much in love. Through a tragic event on the day they become engaged, they seperate, Betts leaves North Carolina and breaks off from her family and JD. Moving forward 19 years and the true story starts. This book is filled with a variety of emotional upheavals - I laughed through many chapters and cried through the same number, but the one thing you can't get around is everyone in this novel carries some kind of secret. Secrets and lies - this is the glue that seems to hold these two families together for bettter or worse. Ms. Franks writes with a vividness and Southern style that makes you want to be sitting on your front porch sippin' at a Mint Julep while you watch the 'gators slowly swim by in the murky river. JD and Betts are thrown together again after 19 years when Betts, now a high-powered New Yorker, whose job it is to evaluate and restructure distressed properties for her company, finds herself forced to work on a project back home in North Carolina with Langley Developement , AND J D Langley on the Bulls Island project. Secrets and lies, and Betts seems to be hiding the bigggest secret and telling the largest lies. I was more than half-way through this book, before Ms Frank started to make me worry that the secrets will remain untold and the lies would remain un-apologized for...more chapters went by and I started to gnaw at my finger-nails thinking she could never pull this off. Just when i thought I couldn't stand another moment of suspence it happened...Betts secret is out. I read the last chapters with much skepticism thinking that the ending was just too pat, too easy...too false. But thank God for the epilogue. It sealed the deal in making this a perfect beach -read and for making me go to the bookstore to pick up all Ms. Franks books to add to my collection. On a side note - In the first quarter of the book, Betts does have a bit of a fling with someone so totally out of her comfort zone, that I had to wonder why Ms. Franks bothered. But, the pieces seem to fall together in the last chapters and I see why she had Betts do something so out of character!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2014

    Another Great One by Dorothea Benton Frank

    This is another great story that takes place in the low country of South Carolina.

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  • Posted June 6, 2014

    enjoyed

    This is the first book I have read by Dorothea and now I have ordered another one. This book is very detailed and a creative read. Many twist that flowed nicely into the whole plot.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2014

    Nanny

    Amateurly written. Story was disjointed and would be fitting for a young reader.

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  • Posted April 9, 2014

    The story was good and I enjoyed the book, however, I felt that

    The story was good and I enjoyed the book, however, I felt that it was a little "rushed". At times it seemed like the characters did a complete 180 with regard to their feelings and reactions to a particular situation instead of taking the time to have them come around more slowly over time. All in all, it was an enjoyable book and I would recommend it. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2013

    Good Read

    I enjoyed this nook book. I enjoy her stories. Not the first I have read and will not be the last................. of her books

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2013

    Great read

    This was a very fun and interesting read. The only reason to rate 4 instead of 5 is character development could have been more in depth if that makes sense. That said....really enjoyed this novel and highly recommend.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2013

    Have read it twice, that is something I rarely do.

    Love her books.

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