Bumblebee Bike

Bumblebee Bike

by Sandra Levins
     
 

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When David wants something, he wants it right away. So when David sees his friend Payton's Superman, he borrows it. Well, he sort of borrows it. He borrows it without asking. In fact, David has a secret treasure chest of things he's borrowed without asking. But when someone takes David's prize possession - his bumblebee bike - he realizes how borrowing without

Overview

When David wants something, he wants it right away. So when David sees his friend Payton's Superman, he borrows it. Well, he sort of borrows it. He borrows it without asking. In fact, David has a secret treasure chest of things he's borrowed without asking. But when someone takes David's prize possession - his bumblebee bike - he realizes how borrowing without asking makes other people feel, and sets out to make things right. A Note to Parents and Caregivers by Mary Lamia, PhD, provides more information about this normal phase of childhood development, and offers strategies for teaching children ethical behavior.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
06/01/2014
PreS-Gr 2—What David sees, David wants. And what is worse, he takes it without asking. He has "borrowed" a number of things from his friends and neighbors and hides them in his closet. Somewhere deep down, he knows what he has done is not right, but that doesn't stop him. Then one morning, he goes out to the garage to get his beloved bumblebee bike, and it's not there. It is then that David realizes what it feels like to have something you treasure taken from you. He returns all of the items to their owners and apologizes. All is forgiven, and the police appear with his bike. Stories like this fail because the message becomes more important than the tale. Didacticism trumps imagination, leading to a less-than-satisfying book with average-quality, full-color art. Consider using Jon Klassen's This Is Not My Hat (2012) and I Want My Hat Back (2011, both Candlewick) for strong stories, fantastic art, and a laugh or two along the way. After the laughter dies down, talking about stealing is inevitable. Likewise, stealing is pivotal in the plot of Tomie dePaola's Strega Nona (S. & S., 1975), but it offers much more than cautionary advice. Because the message is embedded in a rich story, the lesson of honesty is more likely to stick.—Joan Kindig, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781433816451
Publisher:
American Psychological Association
Publication date:
10/28/2013
Pages:
1
Sales rank:
1,141,923
Product dimensions:
7.90(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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