Bumblebee, Bumblebee, Do You Know Me

Bumblebee, Bumblebee, Do You Know Me

by Anne F. Rockwell
     
 

Ladybug, ladybug do you know me?� My thorns are prickly, but my blossoms are soft.� I am a rose.� This is a garden of a book—filled with the scents, textures, colors, and shapes of the first flowers young children notice.� Featuring a striking design that pairs a vivid silk-screen illustration of a flower with a simple riddle.

00 Kansas Bill Martin, Jr.

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Overview

Ladybug, ladybug do you know me?� My thorns are prickly, but my blossoms are soft.� I am a rose.� This is a garden of a book—filled with the scents, textures, colors, and shapes of the first flowers young children notice.� Featuring a striking design that pairs a vivid silk-screen illustration of a flower with a simple riddle.

00 Kansas Bill Martin, Jr. Picture Book Award Masterlist

Author Biography:

Anne Rockwell as everyone concerned with children knows, is the author and artist of more than one hundred books for young readers and listeners. Among her most popular books are The Three Bears and Fifteen Other Stories; The Robber Baby: Stories from the Greek Myths; The Acorn Tree and Other Folktales; The One-Eyed Giant and Other Monsters from the Greek Myths; Once Upon a Time This Morning (illustrated by Sucie Stevenson); and Long Ago Yesterday. Ms. Rockwell lives in Connecticut on the Shore of Long Island Sound.

In Her Own Words...

"I've been told that the first words I spoke were the colors of things, and I can't remember when I didn't make pictures.

"When I discovered the rich and exciting worlds to be found in books, I was fascinated by the art and civilization of Ancient Egypt. It wasn't only the detailed storytelling paintings by Egyptian artists that caused me to feel such a strong identity with that long-ago civilization. I also lived in a place called Memphis. My home, however, was not the ancient city on the banks of the fertile Nile River. I was born in that Egyptian city's namesake in Tennessee—on the wide and muddy Mississippi River.

"When I was five or six years old, I made a painting of a quite imaginary QueenCleopatra floating down the Nile on a quite imaginary and super-colorful barge. When I won first prize in a children's art contest for this painting, I decided I had become, from that day on, a professional artist.

"Much as I loved drawing and painting, I also loved to read. My home was full of books on many subjects, and I probably read as many originally intended for adults as written for children. Rainy days were my favorites, for then I didn't have to go outside to play. Instead, I could stay indoors reading and making the kind of pictures missing from many books I read. I liked to read about things that were real and things that weren't. I was equally fascinated by the things people had actually achieved and those they had only dreamed of and imagined. This is still true.

"Books meant so much to me that I hoped, one day, to write a book other children would enjoy reading. And my book would be filled with the kind of pictures I craved. But I appreciated too much the difficulties inherent in finding just the right words for whatever I wanted to say. So writing remained a secret aspiration, for I was convinced I wasn't good at it. In fact, writing down my thoughts was the hardest thing I'd ever tried to do.

"Since then I've learned that the way to write is by writing. If my first try isn't as good as I'd hoped it would be (and it rarely is), then I rewrite. And when I read that, I usually rewrite some more. It is hard work, but work I love.

"By now I've written stories and painted pictures for many books for children. I've been very lucky, for like the heroines of so many of the fairy tales I loved, all that I've wished for has come true.

"Except for one thing. I still haven't been to Egypt."

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Just in time to herald spring's flowers, Rockwell (Once Upon a Time This Morning) has created a graceful primer on the inhabitants of the backyard garden. Each spread poses an evocative flower riddle to a different insect: "Bumblebee, bumblebee, do you know me? Yellow and green, I wave to the breeze to say that spring is here." The answer, "I am a daffodil," is found on the opposite page in lighter typeface, set in a line following the curve of the flower's leaf. Nine other flowers follow; for the grand finale, the riddle is addressed to a "little boy," and the subject, a sunflower, stands tall across the spread when the book is held sideways. Using silk screens painted with watercolor and gouache, Rockwell creates elegant stylized shapes that efficiently and memorably communicate each flower's architecture to young eyes; at the same time, she's able to convey the softness of a petal and the radiant layers of color that exist in a single blossom. She underscores the simple beauty of her paintings with a stunning book design that plays down its own sophistication: ornamental capitals subtly accentuate the flower and insect compositions; the white ground is in perfect balance with the fields of gorgeously chosen color. The look is as fresh as a daisy. Ages 3-7. (Feb.)
Children's Literature - Helen J. Gaush
What flower is yellow and green and waves to the breeze to say that spring is here? And what flower is "curly and speckled," with the sweetest of all smells? Early readers will learn the answers to these and other riddles, in Bumblebee, Bumblebee, an introduction to the wonders and beauty of flowers. And, along the way, they'll make friends with all kinds of different bugs! Lots of colorful pictures and a simple text make this an engaging story for very young readers.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1--A disappointing effort. On each double-page spread, a riddle about a flower is addressed to an insect: "Butterfly, butterfly,/do you know me?/Here I stand, tall and straight,/while my silky cup catches rain." The left-hand page shows the insect set against a background color that coordinates with the flower, which appears on the right with its name tucked into the drawing. The illustrations, done with watercolors and gouache on silk screen, are uneven. A few of the images are eye-catching--the iris has some stunning purple tones and the rose some lively shades of pink and red. The majority of the flowers, however, look washed-out and dull. While words are simple, most of the clues are not. Children may not be familiar with the names and appearances of some of these blooms, such as zinnias and morning glories. Lois Ehlert's Planting a Rainbow (Harcourt, 1988) is a more appealing and colorful introduction to flowers.--Dina Sherman, Brooklyn Children's Museum, NY

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060282127
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
02/01/1999
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
8.29(w) x 10.27(h) x 0.32(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

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