Bunker Hill [NOOK Book]

Overview

"Howard Fast is fiercely American, he is one of ours, one of our very best."

-The Los Angeles Times


One battle will determine the fate of Boston


Three thousand soldiers from the world's greatest army are cornered in Boston, surrounded by farmers and doctors turned rebel soldiers and generals. For a week both sides are at an impasse, until June 17, 1775, when the ...

See more details below
Bunker Hill

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price
(Save 26%)$14.99 List Price

Overview

"Howard Fast is fiercely American, he is one of ours, one of our very best."

-The Los Angeles Times


One battle will determine the fate of Boston


Three thousand soldiers from the world's greatest army are cornered in Boston, surrounded by farmers and doctors turned rebel soldiers and generals. For a week both sides are at an impasse, until June 17, 1775, when the standstill comes to a violent, bloody end on Breed's and Bunker hills.

In Bunker Hill, master storyteller Howard Fast recounts the unlikely battle that changed the course of the Revolutionary War forever. Tensions rise among both the British and Colonial soldiers as political and tactical frustrations, dissent, confusion, and fear threaten to tear both sides apart before the fighting even begins.


"Fast is at his best as Storyteller."

-Christian Science Monitor

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402255663
  • Publisher: Sourcebooks, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 7/1/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 84,707
  • File size: 591 KB

Meet the Author

Born in 1914, Howard Fast published over 53 novels, including numerous New York Times Bestsellers. His writing has been praised by the New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, the Chicago Tribune and Time magazine. His most famous novels included Spartacus, Freedom Road, My Glorious Brothers, and The Immigrants series.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

June 12


Merton knew the rat; the rat knew Merton. For five months they had lived together in the stinking hold of the frigate, and during those five months they had measured and developed a healthy respect for each other. Merton had a commendable and profound knowledge of rats. They had shared living space with him since his memory began, on land as well as at sea. And the rat had also developed a commendable knowledge of Merton. The rat was very large, and Merton was small, only five feet two inches in height; they were both intelligent, ingenious, and agile. Merton simply had the advantage in being a man. As a man, he was determined to kill the rat. The rat, being a rat, was only determined to remain alive.


The rat was gray, with a white face and white paws, which identified him specifically and was finally his undoing, since it turned Merton's animosity against all rats into a single direction. Merton devised traps, poisoned bait, and laid ambushes, and all of it failed. Finally, on the twelfth of June, in the year 1775, luck and the mysterious workings of doom coincided. The rat ventured onto the gun deck. Merton happened to have a marlinspike in his hand. He let go with the spike and caught the rat squarely and stunned him, which gave Merton a chance to bash in the rat's head.


Dancing a small dance of victory, Merton held up the enormous rat for his shipmates to see. "Now if this ain't the biggest bleeding son of a bitch that ever lived, then I am a dick's udder! I said I'd get the bastard, and I got him!"


"You bloody well got him," they agreed.


"Weighs three pounds if he weighs an ounce."


"And what are you going to do with the little bastard, Merton?"


Merton smirked and stared from face to face at his grinning shipmates. "Now what am I going to do with him? And wouldn't you like to know?" Out with his knife. He gutted the animal, tore out its entrails, and flung them over the side into the water of Boston Harbor. Then, quickly and expertly, disregarding the pool of blood at his feet, he beheaded the rat and skinned it.


"Looks like a bleeding hare, don't it?"


"Looks like a rat to me."


"Cook it up and eat it, Merton. It'll taste better than rotten salt pork."


Merton wiped his knife on his pants and grinned.


"And get a bucket of water and wash down the deck," said the bosun.


"Ah, that I will, bosun. That I will."


His mates lost interest and wandered away. After he had washed down the deck, Merton took the rat's body into the galley. The cooks were at the bow fishing, the galley was empty except for a scullery boy, and Merton told him to keep a still tongue in his head. Grinning and chuckling, the scullery boy watched Merton butcher the rat and drop it into a pot of soup that was simmering for the officers' mess.


Few enough liked Merton. He had a mean, tortured, shrunken soul, and he lived a mean, tortured, shrunken life. The scullery boy hated him, and the captain's coxswain hated him, but since the scullery boy hated the captain as well, he waited until after the captain's dinner before he informed the coxswain of Merton's addition to the soup pot.


The coxswain communicated the news to the first officer, and Merton was duly reprimanded. He was bound to a mast to receive fifty lashes across his skinny back.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Bunker Hill: An Introduction      v

The Major Characters                 ix

June 12                                  1

June 13                                              3

June 14                                  65

June 16                                              79

June 17                                              95

June 17, 9:00 AM                    119

June 17, 11:00 AM                     135

June 17, 2:00 PM                       159

June 17, 4:00 PM                                  187

June 17, 5:00 PM                      197

June 18, 8:00 AM                                 211

Afterword                                221

Born in 1914, Howard Fast published over 53 novels, including numerous New York Times bestsellers. His most famous novels included Spartacus, Freedom Road, Citizen Tom Paine, April Morning, The Crossing, The Unvanquished, My Glorious Brothers, and the three generation family saga beginning with The Immigrants. Nineteen of his works became movies.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2013

    Quite possibly the worst book I have ever read.

    To be honest, I could not stomach more than the first couple chapters. Reads like a cheap dime store paperback. Simply dreadful.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 10, 2013

    recommend

    fun read

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2013

    Hate it

    HATED IT DOOO NOOOT GET!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)