Bunnies, Crocodiles, and Me

Bunnies, Crocodiles, and Me

by Peter Allen, Anne Brouillard, Catherine Benas
     
 

Through inventive stories, whimsical art, and clever design, this book answers the one question every child asks: "Where did I come from?" Bunnies, Crocodiles, and Me reveals birth from its most abstract expression (the birth of a planet) to its most simplistic (crocodiles hatching). The stories, which provide just enough information to satisfy a young child'sSee more details below

Overview

Through inventive stories, whimsical art, and clever design, this book answers the one question every child asks: "Where did I come from?" Bunnies, Crocodiles, and Me reveals birth from its most abstract expression (the birth of a planet) to its most simplistic (crocodiles hatching). The stories, which provide just enough information to satisfy a young child's curiosity, include a calf who cannot wait to be born, a dinosaur who breaks out of his shell and takes his first steps, and warm and fuzzy bunnies who snuggle together in the womb. The range of stories and artwork styles allows children of different ages to appreciate the mystery and excitement of birth.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This anthology of 13 pieces, translated from the French and published in the same compact format as the publisher's Travel Tales, takes provocative stances on birth and babyhood. Each of the nine author/artists interprets "baby beginnings" in a radically different way. The title refers specifically to a story of twin rabbits, shown in white-on-black images that simulate sonograms, and to a comic strip about a croc who hatches from an egg and then tumbles into a soft-boiled breakfast. Gilles Eduar models the volcanic origins of earth and prehistoric life ("Some of the fish wanted to leave the water, and their fins became paws"), and he paints his primeval scenes on for-rent ads, indicating the evolution of terra firma. Peter Allen's "Life Is Good" wordlessly maps an infant's routine in pictograms gentle enough for a congratulations card. Katja Gehrmann favors a more rough-hewn approach. In her visceral "Me," she pictures a peach-colored cow whose transparent belly reveals a contented fetal narrator. This earthy treatment of pregnancy is balanced by Muzo's humorous "Little Monster," which uses the visible-uterus conceit to introduce a grouchy green creature ("And the minute he came out, the baby and his brother started fighting. The End"). Anne Brouillard's "Lots of Little Things," painted in a fauvist manner in rainy-day hues, closes the book with a philosophical prose poem. An avant-garde yet amiable range of work. Ages 3-8. (Sept.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
A truly unique anthology, these stories about birth are written for very young children. Translated from the original French, the 13 stories by 13 different authors and artists explore everything from "The Great Story" of the beginning of life on earth, to a picture essay on the good life of a baby. "Me" by Katya Gehrmann, follows the pregnancy of a cow. Not just any cow, but one with many familiar characteristics. We even see her in labor in a hospital, her baby being caught by a nurse. The common thread is a delightful irreverence and funky artwork. All kids wonder where they came from, and this is a delightful way to explore all the angles. 1999, Harry N. Abrams, Ages 2 to 8, $14.95. Reviewer: Kristin Harris
New York Times Book Review
...offers a soft, whimsical exposure to the origin of babies...appropriate for children just learning to read...charming...
Kirkus Reviews
The cuddly baby bunny image on the jacket is not the most representative sensibility of this collection of tales written and illustrated by European artists—Peter Allen, Catherine Benas, Anne Brouillard, Alain Crozon, Gilles Eduar, Pascal Estellon, Katja Gehrmann, Bruno Gilbert, and Muzo—who tend more toward the wild and woolly. The first tale by Eduar is a truncated scheme of evolution, which gets people onto the scene with dispatch, then sets them off on little, ocean-going rafts to "see what they would see." That answers the unstated premise question of the project, "Where did I come from?" with the same visual and textual abandon of many of the tales. Gehrmann's "Me," for example, may be best described as an Expressionistic cutaway of the gestation and birth of a calf. Muzo's little monster, also seen in cutaway, doesn't want to be born at all until its big brother promises a fight. Offerings for the very youngest children include a quick counting story by Allen, "1 to 10 in the Maternity Ward," and an object identification chart of what's "In My Suitcase." Brouillard's "Lots of Little Things" is very French in mien and mood, full of atomistic musings. There is something here for nearly every taste and developmental level, ideal for readers who don't object to being dropped abruptly into a strange, fantastic, richly textured rabbit hole. (Anthology. 3-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780810941052
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/1999
Pages:
78
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.75(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
5 - 10 Years

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