Bunny Cakes

Bunny Cakes

5.0 4
by Rosemary Wells
     
 

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It's Grandma's birthday, and Max wants to make her an icky, worm-infested cake. But Ruby says, "No, Max. We are going to make Grandma an angel surprise cake, with raspberry-fluff icing." Will Max let his bossy older sister keep him out of the kitchen? Or will they both become bunnies who bake?

Overview

It's Grandma's birthday, and Max wants to make her an icky, worm-infested cake. But Ruby says, "No, Max. We are going to make Grandma an angel surprise cake, with raspberry-fluff icing." Will Max let his bossy older sister keep him out of the kitchen? Or will they both become bunnies who bake?

Editorial Reviews

Sesame Street Parents
The two bunnies are preparing for Grandma's birthday. Max makes and earthworm birthday cake with mud. Ruby begins work on an angel surprise cake with raspberry-fluff icing. Max wants to help his sister, but, somehow, always manages to knock things off the table. Wells's ink-and-watercolor pictures of the siblings are both hilarious and tender. Every younger sib or small member of the family will recognize Max's determination, mischief, and love.
Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
It's kitchen chaos as Wells's beloved Max and Ruby become bunnies who bake. Max and Ruby each have grand plans for Grandma's birthday cake. Max envisions an earthworm cake with caterpillar frosting and "Red-Hot Marshmallow Squirters" on top. Ruby, however, insists on an "angel surprise cake with raspberry-fluff icing." Max tries his best to help his bossy older sister but, as always, winds up making a mess. After spilling the milk or breaking the eggs, Max is repeatedly dispatched to the store with Ruby's neatly printed list of ingredients, all the while trying to figure out how to convey his own request to the grocer. Wells's (My Very First Mother Goose) ink-and-watercolor world is cheery as ever here, replete with a cozy, '50s-esque kitchen and friendly neighborhood market. She accurately captures the prickliness of sibling exchanges ("There's a yellow line on the floor, Max," says Ruby when Max returns with a replacement bottle of milk. "You can't step over that line"). Hapless Max maintains a happy-go-lucky demeanor in any situation, a shining example of patience and perseverance. And when it comes to the interplay between pared-down text and eventful illstrations, Wells, quite simply, takes the cake.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
It's kitchen chaos as Wells's beloved Max and Ruby become bunnies who bake. Max and Ruby each have grand plans for Grandma's birthday cake. Max envisions an earthworm cake with caterpillar frosting and "Red-Hot Marshmallow Squirters" on top. Ruby, however, insists on an "angel surprise cake with raspberry-fluff icing." Max tries his best to help his bossy older sister but, as always, winds up making a mess. After spilling the milk or breaking the eggs, Max is repeatedly dispatched to the store with Ruby's neatly printed list of ingredients, all the while trying to figure out how to convey his own request to the grocer. Wells's (My Very First Mother Goose) ink-and-watercolor world is cheery as ever here, replete with a cozy, '50s-esque kitchen and friendly neighborhood market. She accurately captures the prickliness of sibling exchanges ("There's a yellow line on the floor, Max," says Ruby when Max returns with a replacement bottle of milk. "You can't step over that line"). Hapless Max maintains a happy-go-lucky demeanor in any situation, a shining example of patience and perseverance. And when it comes to the interplay between pared-down text and eventful illustrations, Wells, quite simply, takes the cake. Ages 3-7. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
The irrepressible Max and Ruby are at it again. It is grandma's birthday, and they each want to bake a cake. Max has made an earthworm cake and wants to put Redhot Marshmallow Squirters all over it. Ruby regards his creation with disdain and continues to prepare her angel surprise cake with raspberry-fluff icing. Each time Max tries to help, he creates a mini-disaster in the kitchen and has to go to the store with Ruby's list. Max tries in vain to put squirters on the list, but he doesn't know how to write. In the end, Max succeeds, and grandma is presented with two lovingly created birthday cakes. The illustrations are charming and the page layout, with lots of white space, provides a perfect setting.
Children's Literature - Deborah Zink Roffino
Popular characters Max and Ruby, adorable, jeweled-eyed rabbits, possess that uncanny ability to make everyday activities an adventure. In this bunny tale, they spend a day concocting a couple of birthday cakes for Grandma. This merry book can enhance skills such as communicating, counting, sharing, organization, as well as cooking.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1--Undaunted Max and bossy Ruby, rabbit siblings, make the perfect cakes for grandmother's birthday. A confectionary delight, with layers of laughter. (Jan.)
Kirkus Reviews
The famous Max and his sister, Ruby, are the stars of this self-proclaimed brand-name production—A Max & Ruby Picture Book—but there is no formula here—only extreme originality.

To celebrate their grandmother's birthday, Max is constructing an earthworm cake while bossy Ruby declares that a real cake will be made. She begins whipping one up. Max, in the meantime, breaks the eggs, the first in a series of mishaps that lends repetition—the soul of story hours—to the plot. List from Ruby in hand, he is sent to the store each time he destroys an item, and attempts to add (in a preschooler's version of handwriting) his own sought-after ingredient, Red-Hot Marshmallow Squirters. Each time, the grocer understandably cannot read Max's writing; each time Max returns home, he finds that Ruby is attempting to keep accidents to a minimum by keeping him away from her work. At one point, she posts a drawing in which Max appears inside a red circle with a line through it. Wells's ingenuity never flags, not in the brief text nor in the illustrations. Her close-ups of destroyed ingredients and her many ways of showing two children in the same setting suggest she knows her subject well. Ruby's sloping iced cake is a gem, and Max's is grandly icky and visibly worm-infested: "Grandma was so thrilled, she didn't know which cake to eat first."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780670886869
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
06/28/1999
Series:
Max and Ruby Series
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
455,073
Product dimensions:
9.50(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

Rosemary Wells has created her best-loved characters in the popular bunny siblings, Max and Ruby, who are featured in more than forty books and star in their own television show on Nick Jr. She is also the author of many other books for young readers, ranging from board books to young adult novels. Ms. Wells travels widely as a well-known advocate for literacy and for pre-school education. She lives in Connecticut.

Visit her at www.rosemarywells.com.

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Bunny Cakes (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bunny Cakes it a great read for kids. My daughter (three years old) loves it! She loves the show and I was looking for the books by the original author vs. the others that are out now. Now she teases and wants me to buy marshmellows when we go to the store!
Guest More than 1 year ago
My kindergartener loves this book - and so did I! Its adorable and will be remembered as the first book my little guy ever read by himself. Charming and memorable and funny.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My children absolutely love this book. My 2 year old has to have it in the car with her! My son especially likes the earthworm cake & the red-hot marshmallow squirters.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My daughter loved this book when she was younger and still loves it now that she's 6 and can read it for herself. It maintains the appeal because the difference between Ruby's writing and Max's is even more obvious once the child can read.