×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Buried Alive: The True Story of Kidnapping, Captivity, and a Dramatic Rescue (NelsonFree)
     

Buried Alive: The True Story of Kidnapping, Captivity, and a Dramatic Rescue (NelsonFree)

4.1 33
by Roy Hallums
 

See All Formats & Editions

A true-life adventure sure to shock as well as inspire.

AK47s, masked thugs, and brutal urgency erupt from Roy Hallums' account of his abduction in Iraq, shredding through those frequently sterile cable news reports revealing that another "American contractor is being held hostage . . ."

Hallums was the everyman behind that report?a 56-year-old

Overview

A true-life adventure sure to shock as well as inspire.

AK47s, masked thugs, and brutal urgency erupt from Roy Hallums' account of his abduction in Iraq, shredding through those frequently sterile cable news reports revealing that another "American contractor is being held hostage . . ."

Hallums was the everyman behind that report?a 56-year-old retired Naval commander working as a food supply contractor in Baghdad's high-end Mansour District.

His abduction was transacted in a matter of minutes, amidst a hail of gunfire and a handful of casualties. For the first few months of his captivity, Hallums endured beatings and psychological torture while being shuffled from one ramshackle safe house to another.

From the four-foot-tall crawlspace where he carried out the bulk of his nearly year-long abduction, Hallums established a surprising degree of normalcy?a system of routines and timekeeping, along with an attention to the particulars that defined his horrific ordeal. His experience is recreated here, rich with harrowing specifics and surprising observations.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781418584153
Publisher:
Nelson, Thomas, Inc.
Publication date:
10/08/2012
Sold by:
THOMAS NELSON
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
861,008
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Roy Hallums, a retired U.S Navy Commander worked as a civilian contractor in Iraq where his company provided food for the American army in Baghdad. He was taken captive in 2004 and was freed by coalition forces in 2005.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Buried Alive: The True Story of Kidnapping, Captivity, and a Dramatic Rescue 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 33 reviews.
VioletCrush More than 1 year ago
Roy was a 56 year old retired Naval commander working for a food supply contractor in Baghdad's high-end Mansour district. In 2004, Roy was kidnapped by gunmen who stormed his Office. 3 Iraqi's and a Filipino Robert was kidnapped along with him. After shuffling Roy and Robert to a few places, they finally kept them in an underground cell in a house in the middle of nowhere. For 311 days Roy along with Robert survived hellish conditions while being blindfolded and handcuffed most of the time. Buried Alive is the story of their survival and hope against all odds.I admire Roy for his courage and his ability to stay sane in the most trying circumstances. Buried Alive is not just a hostage drama. We also get a glimpse into how kidnapping became a business to make money, to bargain or simply to spread terror in foreign countries. The most surprising information was how many Iraqis are kidnapped for extortion. We hear about people from various nationalities being kidnapped and the various foreign government efforts to negotiate, what we don't hear often is how these kidnappers take hostage their own countrymen to get money. The book also gives us a glimpse into Roy's family and how they dealt with his kidnapping. Also, it was interesting to see how the FBI controlled every aspect of information sent/ given about the kidnapping. When I started this book my progress was a little slow but after 50 pages, I just breezed through it. Buried Alive is also a good look behind all those kidnapping and killing videos we've see on the news. Horrifying but true. Recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book will make you think about your faith and trusting God as a human being. After the author spent over 300 in capture in Iraq, one would say the author would be mad at God. However, he grew closer to God through his experience. I would recommend this book to anyone who loves a good thriller or wants to learn how to grow closer to God in all different walks of life.
TnLadyBR More than 1 year ago
An amazing account of Faith, Hope and Love.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well, 'Buried Alive' was the book I was really waiting for. I had this much profound interest regarding the atrocities and disasters that are going on in war-ridden countries like Iraq, Afghanistan. I went through the books like 'A Thousand Slendid Suns' and 'The Kite Runner' by Khaled Hussaini, and all these books made me is more touchy about the situations. And then, I happened to get a handful of this piece. Short description: Contractor Roy Hallums recounts the harrowing ten months he was held captive by Iraqi insurgents, the heroic rescue by American troops, and the faith that helped him survive it all. In November 2004 Roy Hallums was working late at his office in Iraq at the Saudi Arabian Trading and Construction Company, supposedly well-protected by armed security guards, when four kidnappers broke in and hauled him away at gunpoint. The next ten months were the darkest of his life. Hallums spent most of his time in a concrete pit beneath a farmhouse, constantly bound and blindfolded. A small pipe in the ceiling provided the room's only oxygen - and its only link to the outside world. Hallums banked on one group in particular not forgetting his existence-the US military. And sure enough, on September 7, 2006, they successfully rescued him. This is the edge-of-your-seat story of a trip through hell for Hallums, the daring rescue mission, and faith that brought him through the experience. Feedback: Buried Alive is a story of humiliation and terror that Roy had to face during his ten months of captivity by the Iraqi insurgents. Many a times while going through the book, I was having flashbacks of the 2009 movie 'Brothers' starring Toby Maguire of Spiderman fame. In a short stint in the movie it was shown how he and one of his friends were being kept captive. Finally, the character of Toby in the film was forced to kill his friend and what followed was a horror filled life on his own. Little wonder that he could not forgive himself. These emotions and sentiments are reflected in this book. Though not the exact same ways, but then, when you are suffering due to the mistakes you have never done, the language of pain is all the same all throughout. Verdict: 'Buried Alive' is a must read book - It gives an insight to the ones who want to know about the problems and insurgencies in the Middle-East. And also this book gives people like me more facts and figures about the same. Terror, torture can never win over life, the final triumph gives this sermon to everyone.
TiffanyMead More than 1 year ago
Buried Alive was a gripping story of an American working in Iraq who was kidnapped by Iraqi insurgents. He was held captive for 311 days and eventually rescued. COULD NOT stop reading this book. finished it in a matter of a few days! The author's attention to recounting the details of his captivity was surprising. I imagine if I were being held captive blindfolded, I'm not sure I would be able to recount such detail. Well written and a great story of not losing faith in extreme situations. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
NicInNash More than 1 year ago
Buried Alive: The True Story of Kidnapping, Captivity, and a Dramatic Rescue, tells the horrific story of Roy Hallums, an American contractor who was taken hostage while working in Baghdad. This is a story of strong will, determination, and most of all, hope. God's gentle rainfall gave Roy the promise of seeing his way out of this ordeal - alive! While most of us would have an extremely difficult time reliving such painful memories, Roy is able to detail his captivity and show us how innocent people, like himself, are still suffering in Iraq today. Our hats are off to the brave men and women who risk their lives to rescue these captives. This story makes you take a step back and reevaluate your own situation when you might think you are having a bad day. (Thomas Nelson has provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for reviewing purposes.)
DksBookReviews More than 1 year ago
1st of all I was drawn to this book for several different reasons I chose this book because it was written by Roy Hallums, a retired U.S. Navy Commander and also because he was held captive in Iraq and it is his true story of what happened to him. I was born on a base and raised on one and I definitely respect the fact that he served our country and had to endure all of the beatings and torture that he did and survived. Roy Hallums, a retired U.S. Navy Commander, worked as a civilian contractor in Iraq. He was taken captive and his life as he knew it was over in just a matter of minutes. He was taken from his office and thrown into a car, a black mask was put over his head and this begins his 311 days of torture. Roy Hallums was taken captive, beaten, tortured and never knew when it was going to happen or if he would survive it. His story takes us through a journey with him and explains to us what he went through and how he felt on a daily basis and how he was buried alive and rescued by Special Forces. I really enjoyed this book from beginning to end. The book is written in a manner that takes you into his life and explains everything in a way that makes you feel you are there. It is easy to read and understand. At first I thought I might have a problem with understanding some of it as I don't know the different types of guns and and some of the lingo used. He explained the words used and what they meant. I loved that aspect about the book. I didn't have to look up what an arabic word meant or words used by the military because I think he just realized most people don't use those words in civilian life and just explains them to us. I found myself wondering what I would do in his situation and how a person could survive some of the things he explains. He never complained about what was happening to him he was worried about everyone else and how his family was holding up. My heart just sank when he had his hopes up to being saved and then he was just beaten again and again. I felt scared when he did and joy when I knew the special forces were there to get him it brought tears to my eyes. I found myself feeling for the family as he was going through this. I was raised in the military and I know what it feels like to have a loved one overseas. I know what it is like to not know. But to know that he was kidnapped, seeing what he is going through and not being able to do anything about it. That has to be so much worse. I am very glad that I have had this opportunity read his book. It brings a lot of things to light. You might think when you see the news about how someone is kidnapped over there how bad it must be but to really know and understand what really happens is totally different. Everything is told in a matter that you understand and with details that are not gruesome in anyway. I will look at the news of kidnappings over there in a different way now. I feel this book was a great learning experience as well as a wonderful read. I do recommend this book to anyone. I would like to thank Roy Hallums for his service to our country and a big thanks to the military forces that go into these hostile areas to save our loved ones in their time of need. I just think that they should be recognized more for what they do for us. Thanks again. I was provided this book from Thomas Nelson Publishing Company as part of their BookSneeze book review bloggers program. This review is of my own honest opinion on
Eternal-Activist More than 1 year ago
Contractor Roy Hallums recounts the harrowing ten months he was held captive by Iraqi insurgents, the heroic rescue by American troops, and the faith that helped him survive it all. One day when Hallums was working late at his office in Iraq four kidnappers broke in and hauled him away at gunpoint. The book is a description of the next 10 months in captivity. The ten months were the darkest of his life. Hallums spent most of his time in a concrete pit beneath a farmhouse, constantly bound and blindfolded. A small pipe in the ceiling provided the room's only oxygen - and its only link to the outside world. Hallums banked on one group in particular not forgetting his existence-the US military. This is the story of a trip through hell for Hallums, the daring rescue mission, and faith that brought him through the experience. This is a remarkable story of a potentially devastating experience that ends well. He also recounts the daring rescue by the U.S. Military that brought him home. It is a riveting tale that keeps you on the edge of your seat, mostly because it really happened. Just amazing.
Noelle_The_Dreamer More than 1 year ago
In Buried Alive, Roy Hallums recounts his story simply with no dramatics, just his courage and strength. His faith in God and Country shines throughout the narration. Suffering unbearable cruelty, humiliation and starvation, he takes each day one at a time. Mr, Hallums was sealed in a concrete tomb for months sometime with other captives, sometime alone. He turns those long hours into "adventures": an incredible road trip across the US one day, a visit with family and friends another day. These mind travels allow him to stay in control during his confinement. To this day this is the only American rescued and I guarantee this to be a hard book to put down. I gave it a 5 star! I received a copy of this book from BookSneeze to write a review.
HarmoniousGlow More than 1 year ago
I dreaded reading "Buried Alive" by Roy Hallums. Nonfiction of this type (especially involving politics and war) usually doesn't float my boat or keep my interest. But once I started reading Hallums' captivating story of his hostage situation, I instead dreaded having to put the book down. Even with all its technical language referring to guns and helicopters, and even with its not necessarily graphic, but detailed descriptions of Hallums' surroundings and treatment, my interest never faded. A contractor in Iraq, Hallums spent ten months in captivity after he happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time and was kidnapped by a group of Muslim extremists raiding his office for information. The extremists held him for ransom, all the while beating him, barely feeding or bathing him, and forcing him to sleep blindfolded and handcuffed on hard surfaces. At one point, Hallums and others were kept in an underground cell, the entrance to which was covered with cement every few days after captors gave them food. Hallums was literally "buried alive." Hallums tells the story from his perspective, but takes breaks from the intense moments he spent in captivity to tell the story from the home-front, quoting American officials who worked to rescue him and focusing on his own family's efforts to keep his name in the media - to keep his case urgent. "Buried Alive" reminds me of how lucky I am to live in America. I don't know what I would do under the circumstances Hallums was subjected to. I certainly don't think I'd come out as healthy as he did, or alive as he did. Hallums' testimony of how he kept faith, hope, and prayer alive during his captivity will inspire readers as it inspired me. I fully recommend this book. I received a free copy of this book from BookSneeze.com in exchange for my honest review.
Puneet_lalwani More than 1 year ago
Buried Alive is a true story written by Roy Hallum about his kidnapping, torture and finally his rescue. The author discusses spending 10 months in captivity in Iraq and his dramatic rescue by US Forces. In November 2004, Roy Hallums was kidnapped from his office in Baghdad and was held hostage.The next ten months were the darkest of his life. Hallums spent most of his time in a concrete pit beneath a farmhouse, constantly bound and blindfolded.A small pipe in the ceiling provided the room's only oxygen - and its only link to the outside world.He describes how Kidnapping has become a booming industry in Iraq. Kidnappers main vision behind was to throw out the invaders, to spread fear and most important to raise the funds for insurgency.And After the 311 grueling days of captivity he was rescued and it was his faith that helped him to survive. The story is written in such a way that you that you are gripped from the beginning to last, mostly because it really happened.It is an well-crafted non-fiction Story and an easy flow that makes it impossible to not get pulled into the flow. I would highly recommend this book to everyone. I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com
Sara_Strand More than 1 year ago
It's a true story of an American who, while working in Iraq as a contractor, was kidnapped and tortured by Iraqi insurgents and held for over 300 days. 300 days, people. Imagine being blindfolded, rationing out small portions of mostly rotted food for a every three day span (if you were lucky), being beaten, having to make videos to plea for your life, and little to no communication with other hostages for over 300 days. If that isn't a description of hell I don't know what would be. What I really enjoyed about this book (well there were several) was that through the whole thing, Roy had a sense of humor. His extensive military training (he was retired from the military but knew if his captors knew that he'd be dead) probably helped him quite a bit. He seemed level headed enough to be able to take mental notes of everything, to keep track of time by paying attention to the Islamic prayers he heard, and was smart enough to figure out what he should/shouldn't do to make it out of there alive. I will confess right here and now that I don't pay attention to the news coverage. I know this may seem idealic and naive, but to me, I know it's something I can't fix. Me watching the constant barrage of news coverage is not going to make a difference. And because I don't watch it- I really have no clue about the war, why there is a war, why people are kidnapped, etc. This book really enlightened me. Am I going to watch the news now? Probably not. Am I going to click on a news link about hostages? Yes. I most likely will. Because I can't even imagine what that is like. What also surprised me was how really unintelligent these people are (meaning the kidnappers and radical groups). I mean one could argue that they have some intelligence if they are kidnapping people in the hopes for ransom payouts in order to fund their insurgency. Sure. I'd give you that. Two points crazy people. BUT, the book really highlighted that despite what you see/read on the news, they are highly unorganized. They couldn't find their ass from their elbow. And despite all of this- it leaves me baffled that the United States, supposedly this really smart (debatable) and powerful country can't beat them. What gives?! The other thing that I know is probably more true than we'd like is how uncooperative the US Government was to Roy Hallums' family. Really, FBI? You can't just give them an update? You can't just say, "We have no clue where he is. Sorry" ?? I'm probably going to get red flagged but I'm sorry. I just think there needs to be a little more bedside manner instead of all of the red tape.
Liza_Ans More than 1 year ago
I chose this book, because it sounded like an interesting read and I love to read true-story books. Buried Alive describes the kidnapping of 56 year old man named Roy who was in captivity for 311 days prior to living and working in Bagdad, Iraq. The book tells his story, from his point of view and recounts how Roy Hallums survived the terror, over and above his family's (ex-wife and 2 daughters) dealt with the nightmare of knowing he was held prisoner or probably dead. It trails the trials and problems Roy and the others must go through while being seized captive and what they had to go through in order to survive. Hallums spent his time with several other individuals including individuals from France, Iraq, and the Philippines I was thrilled about reading this book as I considered it was going to be an inside glance into what really goes in with the Iraqi people when they kidnap and possibly a better look into what is really going on there although, I was dissatisfied with this book. Even though it is a speedy read, I found it hard to begin as well as sometimes dosing off mid-page. I thought the writing was slightly ordinary moreover tedious every now and then. I also felt that it needed in depth emotional essence. Hallums would illustrate being beaten plus starved in such a straightforward style that it made it hard to actually bond with him the same as an individual. It felt that it fell short on how he presented his emotions and was rather programmed in nature when it came to Mr. Hallums trying to explain what he sensed and underwent. It also didn't flow very well, and was often repetitive. In the beginning, I found myself transfixed by the story but laer,just couldn't wait to finish. I also want to include what Jen and Johnson said http://jenhjohnson.blogspot.com/2010/01/buried-alive.html "I also have concerns about the way in which he paints Iraq and many of the Iraqi people. At one point, he does paint with a broad stroke, explaining that many of the Muslims he knew were good, honest people whom he was proud to call friend. But that's where it stops. I cannot imagine what my feelings would be if I found myself in a similar situation, but we are called to love our enemies and pray for those who persecute us. Hallums never discussed this command from our Messiah, and it leaves me wondering if it crossed his mind at all. Because most of the American public is fairly ignorant to what the Muslim faith is, we too often stereotype all followers of Islam as members of jihad. Books like this one concern me because they, even if inadvertently, can easily perpetuate this misunderstanding, fueling hatred of all Muslims. We must remember our great and sovereign God wants all people to come to know him, including Muslims." I can't visualize subsequent to reading the book what it would be like for an individual day after day. The Hallums family gives me a description and perceptive on what exactly a family has to go through and endure in these circumstances. I just wish Mr. Hallums would have let us in, but I think I understand why maybe he just couldn't. In general, I felt the book was educational, but I wouldn't be likely to recommend it as a must read. Though it is a captivating story, particularly bearing in mind what this individual went through, however the method wherein it was presented fell flat.
AFulwood More than 1 year ago
Buried Alive is the account of the kidnapping of 56 year old Roy who lived and worked in Bagdad. This book is a first hand account of 311 days of captivity. First let me make it clear that I am glad Roy Hallums made it back home to his family and friends. I can't imagine even after having read the book what it was like for him day after day. However I found the book itself lacking. It lacked emotions and was fairly robotic in nature when it came to Mr. Hallums trying to explain what he felt and endured. There was sense that he was holding out on the reader. Maybe it was because the experience itself was so horrible that his mind will only allow him to share the surface emotions of his captivity. I wanted to be inspired by Mr. Hallums' experience I was only saddened by his choice to live in an unsafe country. Bagdad is not exactly a tourist haunt. As americans we must consider our choices especially when they put our soldiers at risk. There were some elements in the book I didn't enjoy at all. There was more smoke than fire. The Hallums family account gave me more understanding on exactly what a family has to endure in this situation. They opened their hearts for this book and I don't take that lightly. I just wish Mr. Hallums would have let us in, but I think I understand why maybe he just couldn't. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com <http://BookSneeze.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255
ErikaDawn0130 More than 1 year ago
I picked up this book because it seemed like a compelling topic. It was written by a man who was kidnapped and held hostage in Iraq for about a year. The book tells his story, from his point of view. I wasn't really sure what to expect from the book, and I have mixed feelings about it now that I'm finished with it. It's, obviously, a compelling story....most of us can't imagine going through something so horrible! At the same time, I found myself somewhat annoyed by the way the book was written. It had a tendency to jump from topic to topic and was somewhat fragmented. It didn't flow very well, and was often repetitive. I found myself transfixed by the story in the beginning, yet by the end I just couldn't wait to finish. I didn't see really emphasis on Roy's faith. I was kind of expecting a story about how God got him through his ordeal (since Thomas Nelson is a religious publisher), but that aspect really wasn't mentioned. It didn't bother ME, but it might bother some people if that's what they were hoping to find. It's basically just a detailed account of what happened to him, and really didn't go very deep emotionally. For those interested in politics or current affairs, it would probably be a good read. We don't hear a lot about this aspect of the war, so it was interesting to get a little insight. Just don't expect to be blown away....the writing is relatively unimpressive.
hobnobs More than 1 year ago
"Go into your bathroom, shut the door, push a towel underneath it, and then turn out the lights and curl up on the floor. Try it for fifteen minutes. Now imagine that you are also blindfolded, with a wool ski mask pulled over your head, tied up by your ankles and wrists, and the floor is concrete. For 311 days" This is just a brief description from "Buried Alive" of the conditions under which Roy Hallums was held captive in 2004 by terrorists. Abducted from his workplace in Baghdad he and eventually 10 other hostages were held in the utmost of filthy conditions, suffering beatings, near starvation, humiliation, and fear of being killed for even the slightest movement. This story tells of his horrific experience intertwined with the difficulties his family was dealing with in the states. His strong faith, perspective on survival, and determination to live and return home was evident throughout the entire book. I also found interesting the many nuances towards cultural oddities, the "keystone cops" strategy of his kidnappers, and the lack of cooperation between countries of the other hostages all held captive at this same time. I would definitely recommend this book but be prepared for descriptives that may make the hair an the back of your neck bristle at the evilness that truly exists in this world. "Two weeks ago, while all eyes were on Hurricane Katrina, something extraordinary happened. In a remote farmhouse fifty miles south of Baghdad, coalition forces rescued an American hostage, fifty-seven year old Roy Hallums. Hostage taking has become an ongoing, insidious part of the terrorism in iraq. Two hundred foreigners, including over a dozen Americans, and thousands of Iraqis, have been abducted since the war started. Some hostages are killed, others ransomed. Roy Hallums was rescued. He was found virtually buried underground, blindfolded with his arms and legs bound. He had survived ten month in utter darkness" Lesley Stahl's introduction for a segment on 60 Minutes
WeeShare More than 1 year ago
I have heard the stories of civilians being taken as a prisoner of war. However, until recently, I think this was one of those situations that was in the "out of sight, out of mind" part of my brain. I had never really known a lot about any of the kidnapping situations or the people that were taken. This all became more of a reality for me when I was given the opportunity to read >Buried Alive by Roy Hallums. This incredible book shares the shocking and accurate account of Hallums' kidnapping and the 311 days he spent as a prisoner of war. Roy Hallums was a civilian contractor working out deals for food rations in Iraq. The compound in which he lived was raided by a group of Iragi insurgents. Roy Hallums, one co-worker, and 4 guards were taken hostage. The guards were released within days, but Hallums spent almost all of the 311 days of his captivity along side the co-worker. The details in which Hallum describes the move from safehouse to safehouse are hard to imagine. It is such a horrific situation, that it was at times hard for me to grasp as reality. He tells of beatings, torture, malnutrition, bug infestations, infections, and other awful situations as he fought for his survival. I was just blown away with the clarity in which Hallums' described everything. Throughout the entire ordeal, he maintained such an incredibly clear mind. He was able to rationally decide what details to divulge to the kidnappers and precisely which actions he should take. He maintained such amazing composure, it is almost unreal. The attitude and perspective that he maintained throughout is very respectable. Hallums carefully filed away so many of the details of his ordeal internally. He openly and honestly shares all of the details of his 311 days in hell in the pages of Buried Alive. The book is told as a first person narrative, and follows the chronological sequence of Hallums kidnapping. You will also be able to follow along with what Hallums' family is experiencing back in the states. He tells the emotions and situations they faced as they dealt with the kidnapping of a family member. There is also some direct narrative from one of Hallums' daughters, as he includes pages from her journal during the time of the kidnapping. For me, it was a quick read. I was just so intrigued by this incredible story of survival, that I couldn't wait to see what happened next on the road of survival. It also made me appreciative to live in a country where we often take the incredible freedom we enjoy for granted. It made me proud to be an American.
Tessica More than 1 year ago
Buried Alive by Roy Hallum tells the story of Hallum's harrowing kidnapping at the hands of Islamic extremist and his rescue. Hallum's story is not just for those interested in the War in Iraq, or Islamic extremism or American Patriotism, or anything of that nature really; in fact it is a great read for anyone interested in exploring situations that we are only aware of in our periphery; and even then in a generally fictional setting. Hallum's story is unique in that he is one of few to have survived such an ordeal and in his unassuming style he provides the reader a look into his 311 day long captivity at the hands of a militant extremist group. His kidnapping and subsequent rescue by coalition forces are detailed in a manner that makes this book accessible for not only the knowledgeable but also those unfamiliar with the minutia of the political and military climate of Iraq. Hallum and his interviewer Audrey Hudson describe not only the retired Navy commander turned contractor's ordeal but also the circumstances that put Hallum in the position to be kidnapped. Buried Alive's story is more than just interesting, it is a testament to the strength of hope and faith and would be a great addition to any person's bookshelf. *** I was provided a free copy of this title by Thomas Nelson Publishing for the purpose of reviewing this title as part of the Book Sneeze program***
hloeffler More than 1 year ago
This book is Roy Hallums' account of his kidnapping at the hands of Iraqi insurgents and his 300 plus day psychological journey while in captivity. While his personal account is fascinating, he also includes accounts of his family members and outlines the trails and tribulations they faced while he was held hostage. Particularly poignant are the diary excerpts that are written by his daughter Carrie. These diary entries illustrate the numerous and onerous challenges the family faces in regards to dealing with government and media while attempting to cope with the unknown status of their father. Written in a first person narrative, the text provides a grizzly account of life in captivity. The brutality and traumatizing conditions outlined by the author provides insight into the cruelty that can be found in Iraq. Further, throughout the book the author provides commentary on religious philosophy (particularly Islam) that is thought-provoking but presented at times in a way that some may be offensive to some. Overall, this book is recommended for those interested in a fascinating (and at times graphic) insight into one mans' struggle for survival in the most trying of conditions. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com <http://BookSneeze.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
reader170 More than 1 year ago
"*Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com <http://BookSneeze.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html>: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising." 5 star "Buried Alive" by Roy Hallums The true story of an American food supply contractor in Baghdad, who survived capture of 311 days. He was 56 with a family back in the Untied States. He had worked in Saudi Arabia for 10 years prior to this assignment, yet nothing could have prepared him for that one day. This could happen to anyone and in 2004 it happened to many. Well written, descriptive, informative, with a broad-brush stroke of historical background, sometimes horrific, yet written with control. Ray Hallums tells his story with a bit of humor and calmness. The timelines he lays out for the reader allow you to be in that moment and connect with him and brings you back to where you may been during those months as well. He explains the tragic events and abuse with a steadiness and faith that few may have duplicated. He had to stay calm and trust that he would survive each encounter. The second story is that of his family and how information was released to them, their reactions and fight to find ways to bring him home. Their plea with the US government to help free him from his kidnappers could not be resolved by paying the 12 million dollar ransom. The historical background put this book and what happened to Ray in perspective for me. Reading how the contractors and aid workers functioned in a frightening environment day by day brought me closer to why we are fighting this war. His encounters were harrowing and the rescue effort was a fingernail biter! This book moves quickly and will hold your attention. The author has a way of making you feel as if you were there with him. I recommend it.
Garridon More than 1 year ago
Buried Alive is Roy Hallums' personal account of being held prisoner by Iraqis for a year before being rescued by American troops. He endured terrible hardships and treatment, surviving by taking one day at a time. Usually when I see a book like this, it's written with the help of a co-author who has written other books. Here, the book is written by Mr. Hallums, and it shows in how the book is structured. When I first started reading it, I was overwhelmed by the excruciating detail of what the Iraqis did to their prisoners. It was, quite literally, one thing after another, and we kept getting the same things described over and over again in a high level of detail. It made for tough reading, and I put down the book and couldn't bring myself back to reading it for a while. The story would have been better balanced if every few chapters it broke away and showed us what was happening at home with his wife. With such a difficult subject, this reader needs a breather and didn't get one. The book does bring his wife into book much later in the book, but if I hadn't been reading this for review, I would have not gotten there. Disclosure: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com <http://BookSneeze.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
MSaff More than 1 year ago
"Buried Alive", by Roy Hallums is an extremely thought provoking true story of being kidnapped and held by extremists in Iraq. The story is told through and by the author, Roy Hallums, as he takes the reader from the beginning to the end of a very painful and secluded imprisonment. Most of the time, he is held underground and literally buried alive by his captors. As you pick up this book, you see the shadow of a man who appears to be in a seated position, with his hands behind his back, probably tied and his eyes are blindfolded. It appears that he is in a dark place and very uncomfortable. Reading the introduction gives you just a brief look into what this man went through for so many days and months. I can only imagine the courage and fortitude he had to endure such treatment and conditions. Hallums tells his story in a matter of fact and simple way which brings the reader right into the scenes as well as giving the reader such vivid detail that no one can miss the terror he must have felt, with the beatings and degradation. One can only guess how he felt, not knowing whether he was going to come out this terror alive or would he be beheaded like so many in the past had been. It seems strange to point out here that this story was told in vivid and chilling detail, and this reader could not put the book down. You will become completely absorbed into the story, waiting to find out what is going to happen next. What can be learned from the story, is that with the right mind set and courage, even the most brutal of conditions can be overcome. Hallums appears to be a man of faith and he spent a lot of time praying and thinking about his family. He endured the conditions and initial movements from one site to the next, with a hope of survival and eventual rescue. Another segment of his story deals with how his family dealt with his kidnapping. First the family is kept completely out of the loop of information, even to the point where officials were telling them not to speak to the media for fear that Hallums captors would find out more about the man they held captive. This could have been dangerous for Hallums as he is a retired U. S. Naval Commander, who was a civilian contractor in Iraq, at the time of his kidnapping. The eventual rescue is also something to wait for. This story is in deed a must read for anyone who wants to know exactly what happens to kidnap victims, however, as Hallums notes, he was lucky. Not all kidnap victims get out alive, and very seldom is there a successful escape. This story is rated 5 stars. A very compelling story, not to be missed.
Graziano More than 1 year ago
Roy Hallums, a Man, was kidnapped by Iraqi insurgents and this book tells the story of his ten months of captivity. The journey of Roy from one 'safe' house to another until the last and worst place, a house with an underground where he has been buried alive. Roy tells his story from distance and bravery: survive day by day with the help of his memories (about friends, relatives and an imaginary road trip coast to coast). This book reminds me another one by Oriana Fallaci (A Man) where she tells the story of Alexandros Panagoulis, arrested and tortured because they thought he was against the dictatorship in Greece. Both books teach us the value of small things when our life is full of everything (e.i. a cockroach becomes an important event during the imprisonement of Alexandros) and Roy "Because (he) could not see or do anything, (he) listened to every little sound ..." p. 92 and survive. Roy doesn't grab a 'sound strategy' to survive, apart from Hope. Sometimes the book is even funny: when the kidnappers, after stuffing toilet paper in Roy's ears (to prevent him from hearing), they said "No talking" and Roy responded "Yes, yes" and the guard: "Good" p. 100 I recommend this book to everybody who wants to learn more about the middle-east history, and I expecially recommend to read this story about a Man. I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publisher as part of their Booksneeze.com book review blogger program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, part 255.
lilredhenJP More than 1 year ago
BURIED ALIVE by Roy Hallums Roy Hallums decided to go to his office to do a little work, while he waited for dinner to be served. Suddenly, he found himself surrounded by four armed men, and kidnapped, along with 6 others, from a compound in Baghdad Iraq. One of the other victims, Robert Tarongoy, a Filipino, remained with him through most of the 311 days he was held in captivity. They were held, sometimes in homes, sometimes in sheds, and for the major portion of the time, in an underground hole under the floor of a house about 40 miles from Baghdad. There wasn't room to stand, and the only light they had was a five watt bulb, which was turned off most of the time. This is Mr. Hallums own account of that 311-day captivity, never knowing if or when he would be fed, allowed use of a bathroom, beaten, or even killed. I really enjoyed, if you can call reading of someone's misery and misfortune enjoyable, reading how Mr. Hallums managed to keep count of the days, and his sanity, during his captivity, and how most of his thoughts were of his daughters and grandchild. Worth reading No money was paid for this review, I recieved a free copy of this book to read and review.