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The Buried Temple
     

The Buried Temple

by Maurice Maeterlinck, Alfred Sutro (Translator)
 

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The author writes only for the thoughtful, for those who see a purpose in life and an ideal of character to be achieved. This book must be read with the critical faculty awake, that what is strong and helpful for each may be taken and the remainder left behind. A series of five essays which show remarkable insight and sensitive perception into the things pertaining to

Overview

The author writes only for the thoughtful, for those who see a purpose in life and an ideal of character to be achieved. This book must be read with the critical faculty awake, that what is strong and helpful for each may be taken and the remainder left behind. A series of five essays which show remarkable insight and sensitive perception into the things pertaining to the life of the spirit. Essays included are entitled: Mystery of Justice; Evolution of Mystery; Kingdom of Matter; The Past; Luck.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781500171841
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
06/12/2014
Pages:
54
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.11(d)

Meet the Author

Maurice Maeterlinck (1862-1949), born in Ghent, Belgium, came from a well-to-do family. He was educated at a Jesuit college and read law, but a short practice as a lawyer in his home town convinced him that he was unfit for the profession. He was drawn toward literature during a stay in Paris, where he associated with a number of men of letters, in particular Villiers de l'Isle Adam, who greatly influenced him. Maeterlinck established himself in Paris in 1896 but later lived at Saint-Wandrille, an old Norman abbey that he had restored. He was predominantly a writer of lyrical dramas, but his first work was a collection of poems entitled Serres chaudes [Ardent Talons]. It appeared in 1889, the same year in which his first play, La Princesse Maleine, received enthusiastic praise from Octave Mirbeau, the literary critic of Le Figaro, and made him famous overnight. Lack of action, fatalism, mysticism, and the constant presence of death characterize the works of Maeterlinck's early period, such as L'Intruse (1890) [The Intruder], Les Aveugles (1890) [The Blind], and the love dramas Pelléas et Mélisande (1892), Alladine et Palomides (1894), and Aglavaine et Sélysette (1896). The shadow of death looms even larger in his later plays, Joyzelle (1903) and Marie Magdeleine (1909), Maeterlinck's version of a Paul Heyse play, while L'Oiseau bleu (1909) [The Blue Bird] is marked by a fairy-tale optimism. Le Bourgmestre de Stilemonde (1919) [The Burgomaster of Stilemonde] was written under the impact of the First World War.

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