Burmese Days

Burmese Days

4.5 11
by George Orwell
     
 

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Orwell draws on his years of experience in India to tell this story of the waning days of British imperialism. A handful of Englishmen living in a settlement in Burma congregate in the European Club, drink whiskey, and argue over an impending order to admit a token Asian.
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Overview

Orwell draws on his years of experience in India to tell this story of the waning days of British imperialism. A handful of Englishmen living in a settlement in Burma congregate in the European Club, drink whiskey, and argue over an impending order to admit a token Asian.

Editorial Reviews

Edmund Fuller
...can take an honorable place beside A Passage to India. -- The Saturday Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547564036
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
03/20/1974
Sold by:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
198,270
File size:
578 KB

Meet the Author

GEORGE ORWELL (1903-1950) was born in India and served with the Imperial Police in Burma before joining the Republican Army in the Spanish Civil War. Orwell was the author of six novels as well as numerous essays and nonfiction works.

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Burmese Days 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
grammyNH More than 1 year ago
I never knew anything about George Orwell other than Animal Farm and 1984. I loved this book! Not what I expected from him. Perfect description of the era.
Toros More than 1 year ago
Burmese Days, Orwell's first novel, is a dark, one might even say cynical, look at British colonialism in Burma, where Orwell himself spent five years working with the Imperial Police. He would later criticize his novel as "lifeless," which is exaggerated, I would say. There is indeed life in this work, and death, and one could very well interpret the political purpose in Burmese Days that Orwell felt was lacking - a condemnation of the cruelty of imperialist agents overseas and an implicit plea to reevaluate colonial ventures. At the very least, Burmese Days is heavy with condemnation for such attitudes of cultural superiority that have plagued colonial and imperialist movements around the world. And for that, my gratitude to Mr. Orwell.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was earlier than Orwell's better known works. It surprised me how good (and unknown) it was. It is a terse, very well written examination of both British colonial as well as Indian hypocrisy. True to form Orwell spares no one - including himself. Not as politically complete as the later works, but it shows another dimension of Orwell's great talent. Very worth reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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GeorgeEllington More than 1 year ago
Burmese Days, Orwell's first novel, is a dark, one might even say cynical, look at British colonialism in Burma, where Orwell himself spent five years working with the Imperial Police. He would later criticize his novel as "lifeless," which is exaggerated, I would say. There is indeed life in this work, and death, and one could very well interpret the political purpose in Burmese Days that Orwell felt was lacking - a condemnation of the cruelty of imperialist agents overseas and an implicit plea to reevaluate colonial ventures. At the very least, Burmese Days is heavy with condemnation for such attitudes of cultural superiority that have plagued colonial and imperialist movements around the world. And for that, my gratitude to Mr. Orwell.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I have never read a book that affected me so deeply that I suddenly burst out in tears at the end of it and still cry after I put the book down. It's a sad story of the horrors one will submit themselves to for someone who is not even worth their time. Seriously, everyone should read this, it's very true to life and I learned a great deal about myself from it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In this book Orwell gives a 'fictionlly first-hand' account of his time spent in british occupied India. Although published as fiction any person who has read much more on Orwell will be able to reconize many accounts from his own life. I thaught this was a wonderful book portraying, not only colonialism in a realistic light, but also the feeling of being viewed as different and socially unaccepted by ones peers. Wich, the latter, I would say is a feeling every person has delt with on one level or another, at some point in their life. Orwells' gift of the English language coupled with his comprehensive and eloquent style of writing make this by far one of the best novels I have ever read. I would recomend it to anyone, and everyone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I first read this book while in college during the 1980s. I found it timely and enjoyable then near the end of the Cold War, but find it - along with A Bell For Adano by John Hersey - an even more timely read now as America and Britain prepare to invade and occupy Iraq. This book will always be my favorite Orwell novel. It is that good. It deals more with individual traits/quirks than the more ambitious '1984' and Animal Farm which are, of course, Orwell's masterpiece novels.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book was great. It showed how the opinion of life can change in minutes. I liked the ending. I was not a book in which you could perdict the ending. A good book for those who like the reality of the world.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is one of Orwell's best! Drawing from his actual experience in British Indian Orwell has crafted the most intricate and fast-moving account of racial tension, anti-Imperialist protests, and native poitics. Through several characters of differing social status Burmese Days offers a wonderful overview of Indian society as it was under British colonists. The European characters (including the hero Flory) are often vulgar and generally immoral, while their Indian couterparts are portrayed as both greedy characters and submissive, humble workers. This is the definitive Orwell in regards to an engaging plot and interesting characters.