Burmese Refugees: Letters from the Thai-Burma Border

Burmese Refugees: Letters from the Thai-Burma Border

3.3 3
by T. F. Rhoden
     
 
Burmese Refugees: Letters from the Thai-Burma Border

The misrule of the Burmese military junta continues to be the main catalyst of refugees in Southeast Asia today. In this collection of letters, learn about the true stories of people who have fled from that regime. All of the accounts are written by the refugees themselves and explain how they became asylum

Overview

Burmese Refugees: Letters from the Thai-Burma Border

The misrule of the Burmese military junta continues to be the main catalyst of refugees in Southeast Asia today. In this collection of letters, learn about the true stories of people who have fled from that regime. All of the accounts are written by the refugees themselves and explain how they became asylum seekers, what life is like in the camps, and what they envision for their future. These stories document persons from the 8888 generation, the 2007 Saffron Revolution, and various ethnic struggles. This book contains the narratives of thirty diverse individuals-all of them united by the simple desire to have a more representative government in their homeland.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780615471075
Publisher:
Digital Lycanthrope LLC
Publication date:
07/28/2011
Pages:
114
Sales rank:
906,093
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.27(d)

Meet the Author

Brothers Thomas and Taural Rhoden collaborated to bring the book Burmese Refugees to the general public. After his MBA from Thunderbird, Thomas traveled to the Thai-Burma border to work with refugees on resettlement issues: culture, resume/interview skills, English. The letters and idea for this title come directly from his experience living and working in one of the refugee camps for a year. Taural, graduate of Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien (MBA), has lent his consulting/marketing expertise to turn this project turn into a reality. He is the main exponent behind the multimedia component of the project.

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Burmese Refugees: Letters from the Thai-Burma Border 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sad, tragic, and uplifing, life as seen by the victims of the 8888 Burma (Myanmar) uprising and its aftermath. Added between the stories are recollections of the biographer and sad said as it was to read it was very inspiring. Especially living in a country like ours and as of yet not realizing the strain and hardship of this kind of life.
Katya_Sozaeva More than 1 year ago
Consisting of a number of essays written by refugees from Burma living in Thailand, as well as providing background information about the disparate groups of people fleeing Burma and why, this little book provides a fascinating look into the lives of the Burmese people. The accounts are often subtly harrowing, showing little glimpses into the horror that these people have had to live through in their attempts to be free of the military junta that has been ruling Burma for decades. Anyone interested in learning more about the people of Burma and the lives they have lived should definitely take a look at this book.
thebrunettebibliophile More than 1 year ago
For my complete review, visit: thebrunettebibliophile dot blogspot dot com In terms of content, the stories from the refugees themselves are incredibly moving and inspiring on several levels. I used to teach ESL students myself, and have experienced how challenging writing honestly and accurately can be in a language that's not your first. Kudos to the essayists for bravely taking on that challenge. I would venture to guess that if I attempted the same assignment in, say, French, the result would not be nearly as successful. Though their narratives can be at times choppy and awkward, what shines through in many is remarkable: the will not just to stay alive, but to live life fully. A theme that repeated itself in several of the essays was the desire of the authors to eventually, after resettlement, return to Burma and/or to affect change for the people in their community from abroad. The passionate, determined voices of the refugees are absolutely the book's strength. Reading their accounts, I was seething thinking about all of the injustices, major and minor, the authors had been subjected to living under an oppressive military junta. And if you can get past my criticism below, the book is worth picking up just to read their stories. Unfortunately, there's a lot to sift through to get to these potent firsthand accounts. In fact, I only got through about half of the book before I got so fed up with T F Rhoden I had to stop reading. In the interest of brevity, here are my two biggest problems with the text: 1) Basic spelling, grammar, usage and structural errors: the text is positively rife with them. T F Rhoden's introduction alone is abominable. In affecting a "writerly" voice, he constructs some of the most awkward, roundabout sentences I've ever read. T F Rhoden seems to have no clue who is audience is, and though he apes a scholarly tone at times, this book is clearly not research-based enough for academia. In fact, I can't imagine the brothers hired a fact checker if they clearly didn't bother to hire a copy editor, or even pass the manuscript off to a friend to proof read for that matter. In addition, content wise, there are multiple superfluous details throughout the introduction that any editor worth their salt would have cut in favor of flow. T L S Rhoden fares far better in his introduction, which is much more concise and clear, though he confuses "affect" and "effect." All in all, these sloppy, easily correctable mistakes are incredibly disruptive to the reader and ultimately distract attention from the important part of the book: the Burmese people and their stories. 2) T F Rhoden's ego