Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

4.4 86
by Dee Brown
     
 

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BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE is an eloquent, fully-documented account of the systematic destruction of American Indians during the second half of the 19th century.

Using council records, autobiographies and other firsthand descriptions, Dee Brown allows the great chiefs and warriors of the Dakota, Ute, Sioux and Cheyenne to tell us about the battles, massacres and

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Overview

BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE is an eloquent, fully-documented account of the systematic destruction of American Indians during the second half of the 19th century.

Using council records, autobiographies and other firsthand descriptions, Dee Brown allows the great chiefs and warriors of the Dakota, Ute, Sioux and Cheyenne to tell us about the battles, massacres and broken treaties that finally left them demoralized and defeated. Sadly, this is how the west was really won.

"Fascinating and painful." (The Wall Street Journal)

"Strongly and ardently written." (The New Yorker)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780899669755
Publisher:
Buccaneer Books, Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/2007

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Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee 4.4 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 86 reviews.
KyLady More than 1 year ago
I think I need to read Dee Brown's book, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, every year or two in order to remind myself of the cruelty of those who came before us. Are we still a cruel nation? I am certain that those dealing with Native Americans in the 19th century felt there were not; but this book, most of it told from the perspective of Native Americans, screams that many were indeed cruel. Many American leaders, military, and citizens had no respect for the rights of Native American and they took not only their lands, but their very souls as they marched across the American continent. Though many of the pictures and art work do not always portray these native people naturally, they do add to a better understanding of the story that Mr. Brown wanted us to discover - "often another person's perspective is different from my own." Peace can only be achieved universally if we begin to understand that we are all different and should be treated with respect as to our own beliefs and life styles.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this book should be mandatory reading for all americans. the sand creek horor has been buried for years, now we can read the truth. well documented. i loan this book, give it away, anything to have it read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've read the book three times over the years since it was first published. It documents very clearly the practice of genocide by our forefathers and our government driven by greed. A very proud nation was, for all practical purposes, wiped of the face of the earth. I was recently pleasantly surprised to fine a local high school using this book for a history class. It should be mandatory reading in every school in the United States.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have yet to read 'Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee', but just recently saw a cable-made movie of the same title. If the movie is played out as accurately as the book, ALL American Indians, including the Inuit, and Eskimo of Alaska were given a raw deal. And all this started in 1608 when the Pilgrims arrived at Jamestown, Virginia and Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts 'Ironically, Massachusetts is the only State that is still known by its original American Indian name'. Who the heck were we, in 1492, 1608, and 1620, and during various years after the Civil War, to basically demand that the American Indian be either surrender to the United States or starve and most likely die from it so we get thier land? If I understand all of my American history, had we not come to the Americas, right now I would be home in London, England. Or possibly Barcelona, Spain watching soccer. At that particular era in our minds, the United States Government was at it greediest. Didn't ALL of what we know as the United States (not including Hawaii) 'belong' to the American Indian?
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book several years ago and lost the copy in one of my moves to another home. I purchased another copy and read it again and now that I am older I understand more of how the white man and his greed is like being tied to a rock at the bottom of a waterfall that never stops pounding at you. To this day it still hasn't stopped. This book gives a very detailed, accurate account of what Native American Indians had to put up with then and now, and what sacrifices they made when the arrogant white man started his lying, thieving, and robbing, not only their lands, but their life and livelihood as well. It's no different today, and it's still going on, but thank God Dee Brown wrote an accurate account of what really happened, instead of the fabricated lies that have been perpetuated by the whites for years and years.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought this book was very interesting. It seems to be an accurate description of the history of the Native Americans. And the battles that were fought between them and the 'white men'. I greatly enjoyed this book. The only thing that I thought monotonous about it was that it became quite boring after awhile.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Disturbing but good
qwillspen More than 1 year ago
This book is presentation quality with deep information and leads to analysis of the entire topic of native Americans in the USA. I gaave this to my son, who was amazed. His children put down their presents to read pages and pictures. We discused it all day. Thank you for a really wonderful book.
InkedPink More than 1 year ago
A heartbreaking and informative look at Native American life. Its the other side of the story and for me, filled in blanks left by high school history.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you profess to have any empathy towards Native Americans, this is required reading. From the opening pages that detail the rape of the country by Christopher Colunbus to the takeover by the explorers, it will shock you and hopefully make you think. I highley recommend this to anyone who would like to find out where their ancestors come from, for I feel that we all come from eventually the same place, and that we all are God's children in the end.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Captivating and sadly historically chilling. An impressive account of the plight of the Native Americans, written with documented accuracy and artful storytelling. Highly recommended reading!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really enlightening and easy to read, covers primarily 1860-90, something from each of the regions in the U.S., some of the major figures involved (all sides), and ultimately how Native Americans were pushed onto reservations. Some things I definitely did not know, and it is much more informative than most versions of U.S. history taught to us in school. It was great to get an idea of the Native perspective on many of these country changing events. This was recommend to me by a woman I am in a non-fiction book club with, and I in turn now highly recommend this one as well!
Bookworm1951 More than 1 year ago
A tragic and heartbreaking true story. I did not realize the true extent of the mistreatment of the Native Americans by the settlers until I read this book. Most of the Native American tribes along with this land's natural resources were systematically destroyed by the U.S. Army and government because of greed. Well edited. It is a history book so I did find it a bit dry in places. Lots of great pictures of the Native Americans depicted in this book. Would recommend this historical classic.
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I enjoyed it very much, very insightful.
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