Burying Mao: Chinese Politics in the Age of Deng Xiaoping / Edition 1

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Overview

For almost two decades after Mao Zedong's death, an epic, no-holds-barred contest was waged in China between orthodox Marxists and reformers. With Deng Xiaoping's strong support, the reformers ultimately won; but they—and China—paid a heavy price. Here, Richard Baum provides a lively, comprehensive guide to the intricate theater of post-Mao Chinese politics. He tells the intriguing story of an escalating intergenerational clash of ideas and values between the aging revolutionaries of the Maoist era and their younger, more pragmatic successors. Baum deftly analyzes the anatomy of the reformers' ultimate victory in his brilliant reconstruction of the twists and turns of the reform process.

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Editorial Reviews

Choice
In this highly readable book, Baum provides a fascinating and extremely detailed account of how Deng Xiaoping came to power, how he reversed Mao's policies and launched China on the path of economic reform, how he handled the complex interaction between the top leaders of the Party, and how he deftly preserved supreme power in his own hands. . . . [Readers] will find much in the book that will help them comprehend developments in contemporary China.
Sunday Times
What the book brings out is how dangerous was the territory through which Deng and his men had to pass. It was not a simple matter of assuming power and issuing decrees. . . . Deng emerges from this study less as an emperor than as a consummate politician. . . . Burying Mao is a first-class work, coolly judged and clearly written, drawing on a mass of carefully sifted material.
Sunday Telegraph
. . . [a] thorough, balanced and interesting work.
— Ian Buruma
China Information
Written by one of the best commentators in the United States on Chinese politics, this is . . . [an] extremely thorough, yet accessible account of Chinese politics from 1976 until 1993. . . . Anybody interested in Chinese politics will benefit from reading it, and it will be used widely for courses on Chinese politics in the era of reform.
The New York Times
Baum demonstrates with this book his command of the Chinese political scene in a critical year of transition for China.... Brilliantly researched and full of interpretative and nuanced insights into the leadership struggle, Burying Mao brings China into sharp focus.
— Patrick Tyler
The Times Literary Supplement
This is the right way to look at Chinese politics, in which power and personalities are much more important than ideology, which is regularly twisted to fit current needs.... Baum excellently pinpoints how factions, the bane of Chinese politics, align and realign.
The Economist
It is the most comprehensive guide to hand, and is more persuasive for coming in the winter of Dengism.
The New York Times - Patrick Tyler
Baum demonstrates with this book his command of the Chinese political scene in a critical year of transition for China.... Brilliantly researched and full of interpretative and nuanced insights into the leadership struggle, Burying Mao brings China into sharp focus.
Sunday Telegraph - Ian Buruma
. . . [a] thorough, balanced and interesting work.
From the Publisher
"Baum demonstrates with this book his command of the Chinese political scene in a critical year of transition for China.... Brilliantly researched and full of interpretative and nuanced insights into the leadership struggle, Burying Mao brings China into sharp focus."—Patrick Tyler, The New York Times

"This is the right way to look at Chinese politics, in which power and personalities are much more important than ideology, which is regularly twisted to fit current needs.... Baum excellently pinpoints how factions, the bane of Chinese politics, align and realign."—The Times Literary Supplement

"In this highly readable book, Baum provides a fascinating and extremely detailed account of how Deng Xiaoping came to power, how he reversed Mao's policies and launched China on the path of economic reform, how he handled the complex interaction between the top leaders of the Party, and how he deftly preserved supreme power in his own hands. . . . [Readers] will find much in the book that will help them comprehend developments in contemporary China."—Choice

"What the book brings out is how dangerous was the territory through which Deng and his men had to pass. It was not a simple matter of assuming power and issuing decrees. . . . Deng emerges from this study less as an emperor than as a consummate politician. . . . Burying Mao is a first-class work, coolly judged and clearly written, drawing on a mass of carefully sifted material."—Sunday Times (London)

"Baum demonstrates that Deng Xiaoping is the ultimate Machiavellian leader. . . . the quality of his analysis is first-rate. . . . This should give the reader insight into China as a future world power."—Library Journal

"It is the most comprehensive guide to hand, and is more persuasive for coming in the winter of Dengism."—The Economist

". . . [a] thorough, balanced and interesting work."—Ian Buruma, Sunday Telegraph

"Written by one of the best commentators in the United States on Chinese politics, this is . . . [an] extremely thorough, yet accessible account of Chinese politics from 1976 until 1993. . . . Anybody interested in Chinese politics will benefit from reading it, and it will be used widely for courses on Chinese politics in the era of reform."—China Information

Library Journal
By employing a classical Lasswellian political analysis-who says what, to whom, through which channel, with what effect-Baum political science, UCLA demonstrates that Deng Xiaoping is the ultimate Machiavellian leader, controlling the development and articulation of policy in the Chinese Communist Party CCP. He emphasizes that it is impossible to apply constant, unchanging, ideological labels to individuals and groups in Chinese politics and provides details of interactions that have occurred among a number of powerholders in the CCP. He identifies the theme of "fang/shou" letting go/tightening up as a popular, and also misleading, inter- pretation of Chinese politics. The sheer number of actors Baum discusses may lose the reader, but the quality of his analysis is first-rate. He points out that the majority of Chinese revolutionaries are now dead, and the remainder, including Deng himself, are afflicted with varying diseases associated with old age. Therefore, China has already disregarded the fang/shou cycle. This should give the reader insight into China as a future world power. Highly recommended for academic collections.-Peggy Spitzer Christoff, Oak Park, Ill.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691036373
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 1/8/1996
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 528
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.24 (h) x 1.39 (d)

Table of Contents

List of Tables and Illustrations
Preface
Acknowledgments
A Note on Sources and Methods
Abbreviations Used in the Text
Introduction: The Age of Peng Xiaoping 3
Pt. I The Roots of Reform, 1976-1980 25
Ch. 1 Burying Mao: April 1976-July 1977 27
Ch. 2 Deng Takes Command: August 1977-December 1978 48
Ch. 3 The First Fang/Shou Cycle: Novemher 1978-Angust 1980 66
Ch. 4 High Tide of Reform: Gengshen, 1980 94
Pt. II The Road to Tiananmen, 1981-1989 119
Ch. 5 Polarization and Paralysis: January 1981-April 1982 121
Ch. 6 Defining the Spirit of Socialism: Summer 1982-December 1983 143
Ch. 7 The Rebirth of Liberal Reform: January 1984-Summer 1985 164
Ch. 8 Social Origins of Student Protest: Summer 1985-December 1986 189
Ch. 9 Combating Bourgeois Liberalization: January 1987-Spring 1988 206
Ch. 10 Bittersweet Fruits of Reform: March 1988-April 1989 225
Pt. III The Beijing Spring, 1989 245
Ch. 11 The Beijing Spring: April-May 1989 247
Ch. 12 CrackingDown: June 1989-February 1990 275
Pt. IV The Old Order Changes, 1990-1995 311
Ch. 13 Picking Up the Pieces: Winter 1990-Autumn 1991 313
Ch. 14 Deng's Final Offensive: January-October 1992 341
Ch. 15 The Last Cycle: October 1992-Summer 1993 369
Ch. 16 The Mandate of Heaven: Summer 1993-Summer 1995 377
Epilogue: Burying Deng 391
Abbreviations Used in the Notes 395
Notes 397
References 473
Index 491
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