Bus: My Life In and Out of a Helmet [NOOK Book]

Overview

He was one of pro football’s most beloved and respected stars, admired not only by NFL fans and his own teammates, but by his opponents as well. Super Bowl champion; six time Pro Bowler; NFL Comeback Player of the Year; NFL Man of the Year; fifth all-time leading rusher in the NFL; future Hall of Famer; now NBC Sports commentator.

You may think you know Jerome Bettis, but ...
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Bus: My Life In and Out of a Helmet

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Overview

He was one of pro football’s most beloved and respected stars, admired not only by NFL fans and his own teammates, but by his opponents as well. Super Bowl champion; six time Pro Bowler; NFL Comeback Player of the Year; NFL Man of the Year; fifth all-time leading rusher in the NFL; future Hall of Famer; now NBC Sports commentator.

You may think you know Jerome Bettis, but you don’t.

In The Bus, Jerome Bettis tells his full, unvarnished story for the first time--from his sometimes troubled childhood in inner-city Detroit to his difficult transition at Notre Dame, to a pro coach who almost caused him to quit the game, to a trade for the ages that resulted in ten glorious seasons with the Pittsburgh Steelers.

As a chunky child wearing glasses, Jerome’s only sports-related aspiration was to become a professional bowler. But growing up in one of the roughest neighborhoods in Detroit, he eventually found his escape on the high school football field, thanks to the devotion of hard-working parents, a concerned coach, and his prodigious talent. He arrived at Notre Dame as one of the nation’s best prep players, but despite his incredible performances, he never stopped worrying that he would somehow blow his chance to make good. Drafted and later discarded by the Los Angeles Rams, it was in the football-obsessed city of Pittsburgh that Jerome found his home and became a legend.

The Bus captures the sweetness and honesty of Bettis, but also details the jaw-dropping, violent nature of the game he loved, the mind-boggling injuries he endured, and the cut-throat NFL business tactics he overcame and later mastered. Through it all, Jerome was also a loving son, an adoring father, and the ultimate teammate and mentor.

The Bus not only takes you under the helmet, but inside the huddle, the locker room, the practice field, the negotiating table, the owner’s office, and the Super Bowl sideline. You’ll learn how Bettis became The Bus, how he helped engineer the greatest trade in Steelers history, how he almost cost Pittsburgh a conference championship, and how sweet it was to win—finally—one for the thumb.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Pittsburg Steelers running back Jerome "The Bus" Bettis retired as the fifth leading rusher in NFL history, but probably what endears him most to fans is his genial, modest personality. In fact, Bettis's fame and popularity have probably increased since his 2005 retirement and subsequent broadcasting career. Things were not always so good for this Detroit native. As a teenager, he rode the streets with a rough neighborhood drug gang; only the intervention of his parents and a football mentor kept him on the right side of the law. This autobiography recounts lessons that were even more valuable than a Super Bowl ring.
Publishers Weekly

The National Football League's fifth all-time leading rusher tells of his journey from growing up on Detroit's mean streets to playing for the 2006 Super Bowl Champion Pittsburgh Steelers. As a child, Bettis wore nerdy glasses and preferred bowling. In high school, he began playing football, but also started running with a smalltime neighborhood gang that sold drugs and carried firearms. He credits his escape from crime to his high school coach and his parents for laying down the law as well as the shock of seeing a friend get shot. A highly recruited high school player, he played three years at Notre Dame before turning pro with the Rams (both L.A. and St. Louis). During the latter part of his 13-year career, he had to compete for playing time and deal with a litany of injuries. For his last pro football game, he returned triumphantly to Detroit, which hosted the 2006 Super Bowl. Writing in an easygoing, honest voice, Bettis gives readers a good look at the inside stories of college recruiting, professional contracts and the agony of NFL injuries. He also dishes out opinions on players, calling former Rams quarterback Jim Everett "soft as puppy fur" and Denver Broncos linebacker Bill Romanowski a "coward" who specialized in "cheap shots." (Aug.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Kirkus Reviews
Self-serving career retrospective from one of the NFL's all-time leading rushers and all-around nice guys. Bettis's life is a checklist of quintessential sports fairy-tale elements: dangerous childhood in a poor Detroit neighborhood; drug deals and bad influences; hardworking, supportive parents who instilled values; scholarship to prestigious university (Notre Dame); illustrious and potentially hall-of-fame career in the NFL; storybook ending after winning the Super Bowl in his last game-in his hometown of Detroit, no less. It's beyond question that "the Bus," an immensely popular player as a result of his talent, charm and tireless philanthropy, has a tale to tell. Too often, however, what could have been an enlightening, inspiring look inside professional football by an intelligent man who overcame overwhelming obstacles becomes a rote recitation of game statistics accented by a discordant measure of braggadocio. Bettis chronicles nearly every good game he ever played and offers justifications for some of the bad ones, ranging from the numerous painful injuries he suffered throughout his career to a lack of talented teammates. ESPN writer Wojciechowski (Cubs Nation: 162 Games, 162 Stories, 1 Addiction, 2005, etc.) valiantly tries to inject some life into each chapter via descriptive introductions and interviews with friends, and the duo does manage to provide some genuinely touching moments, particularly when highlighting the unswerving loyalty the Bus inspired in teammates like Hines Ward and Ben Roethlisberger. The book works best when Bettis discusses his relationships with his family and other players or riffs on random topics ranging from his love of bowling to his condemnation ofNotre Dame for its relatively quick firing of black head coach Tyrone Willingham. When it loses itself in the congratulatory minutiae of its subject's accomplishments, however, readers are likely to start heading for the exits. A must-read for fans, but fails to capture the true essence of Bettis's charisma. Agent: Janet Pawson/SFX Media Group
From the Publisher
“Exciting – entertaining – extra special like the Bus himself!”
-- Dan Rooney, owner of the Pittsburgh Steelers

“This is one Bus ride you won't want to get off.'”
Rick Reilly, bestselling author of Who’s Your Caddy? and Missing Links

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385524087
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 9/4/2007
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 477,324
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Jerome Bettis is now a commentator on NBC’s Football Night in America.. He is the founder of The Bus Stops Here Foundation, which works to improve the quality of life for disadvantaged children, and works with the American Lung Foundation to increase asthma awareness. He lives in Atlanta.

Gene Wojciechowski is a senior writer for ESPN The Magazine and ESPN.com. He has authored or coauthored eight books, including Cubs Nation, My Life on a Napkin (with Rick Majerus), I Love Being the Enemy (Reggie Miller), Nothing But Net (Bill Walton) and his baseball novel, About 80 Percent Luck. He lives in Wheaton, Illinois.
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Read an Excerpt

First Quarter

January 15, 2006
AFC Divisional Playoff
Pittsburgh Steelers v. Indianapolis Colts
RCA Dome
Indianapolis, Ind.

Steelers offensive coordinator Ken Whisenhunt sat nervously in the visiting team coaches booth of the RCA Dome. A once earsplitting sellout crowd of 57,449 was now strangely subdued, as if their mouths had been ducttaped shut. Only eighty seconds stood between the Steelers and a second consecutive trip to the AFC Championship game. Pittsburgh led, 2118, and had the ball on the Colts2yard line.

The reality of the situation had become depressingly clear to the hometown fans. Not only did the Steelers have four downs to cover just 2 yards for the game
clinching score, but the mass transit system known as JeromeThe BusBettis was jogging toward the Pittsburgh huddle. It was over. The Colts, favored by as many as ten points by the Las Vegas wise guys, were going to lose. It would take the Colts the football equivalent of Pittsburghs fabled 1972 Immaculate Reception, to save them.

Whisenhunt discussed the Steelers
options with head coach Bill Cowher. There were two choices:

Quarterback Ben Roethlisberger could take three snaps and then take a knee three consecutive times, forcing the Colts to use each of their remaining timeouts. Then the Steelers could kick a chip-shot field goal on fourth down, meaning Colts quarterback Peyton Manning would have about a minute, maybe less, to attempt a touchdown drive with no timeouts remaining against the AFC
s No. 1 defense.

Or they could do what they had done for years: Give the ball to Bettis.

Whisenhunt knew if the Steelers scored to move ahead by ten the Colts couldn
t possibly recover. Whisenhunt recommended the Steelers board the Bus.

You give the ball to Jerome because Jerome doesnt fumble,he told Cowher and the other offensive assistants.Were OK because Jerome doesnt fumble.

Cowher agreed.

Whisenhunt called for a goal
line formation. The play was a nobrainer: Counter 38 Power. Bettis could run it with his eyes squeezed shut. Nobody in Steelers history has run that play better than Bettis. Of his 10,000plus yards gained in a Pittsburgh uniform, it would be fair to say that at least a third of those yards had come on Counter 38 Power.

The Steelers offense took the field. The safest rushing play in the team's Old Testament
thick playbook had been called.

In a nearby broadcast booth, the team of WBGG-AM radio play-by-play announcer Bill Hillgrove, who had spent twelve years as
The Voice of the Steelers,and analyst Tunch Ilkin, a former Pittsburgh AllPro offensive tackle, told their listeners on the fortysevenstation, threestatewide Steelers network that the game was done. The last eighty seconds? A formality, nothing more.

As the Steelers broke the huddle, Hillgrove described the action.

Hillgrove: Now the balls at the 2yard line. Its gone over on downs to Pittsburgh. They have a first and goal and theyve got Jerome Bettis in that lineup.

Ilkin: For all you fantasy football players out there that have Jerome you
ve got to be very excited right now.

Hillgrove: Wouldn
t it be nice for him to get his second touchdown of the game? Heres the give to Jerome. He has it and

Ilkin: Oh! Fumble! Fumble! He picked it up
oh, no!

Hillgrove: The ball is fumbled
and the Colts pick it up! Look out!

Ilkin: Oh, no! My gosh! Oh, my gosh!

Hillgrove: Nick Harper has it


Ilkin: Oh, my gosh! Somebody
s got to tackle him!

Hillgrove: Big Ben tackles him. He tackles him at the 42
yard line.

Ilkin: Oh, my gosh!

Hillgrove: Jerome Bettis, who rarely fumbles, fumbles at the goal line. Nick Harper picks it up and the Colts are still alive with 1:01 to go!

Ilkin: Oh, my gosh! Oh, my gosh! All you got to do is fall on the ball! What a turn of events! OK, now you got 1:01 left, right? The Colts got the ball on the 42
yard line. The game is not over. Cancel the reservations to Denver. We got to finish this one out here. Unbelievable! I just cant believe what I just saw. The Steelers hand the ball off to Jerome with 1:20. All you gotta do is take three in a row quarterback sneaksThe Steelers are lucky that that ball isnt run in for a touchdown by Harper. If it wasnt for Ben Roethlisberger making a shoestring tackle the games over the other way.

Whisenhunt and the other assistants were in shock. Bettis fumble? How was that possible? Bettis hadnt fumbled once in the entire 2005 season. Hed only fumbled ten times in his last six seasons, only fortyone times in 3,479 regular season carries.

A disturbing thought flashed through Whisenhunt
s mind: What if that was the last carry of Bettiss career? Imagine that: The final carry in the glorious thirteenyear career of Jerome Bettis would cost the Steelers a chance to reach the AFC Championship andif they were to beat the Denver Broncosto play Super Bowl XL in Bettiss hometown of Detroit.

Whisenhunt wasn
’t the only one thinking Bettiss career might have come to an inglorious end. In Miami Lakes, Florida, Bettiss former NFL teammate Tim Lester had watched the ball pop free and bounce into Harpers hands.

No, my boy cant go out like that,thought Lester, who was Bettiss fullback in Los Angeles, St. Louis, and Pittsburgh.It cant end this way.

In El Paso, Texas, Bettis
s former high school coach Bob Dozier also stared at the television screen in disbelief.Wow, this cant be,he thought.This kids done too much to deserve this.

And at Cupha
s bar on Pittsburghs South Side, Steelers fan Terry ONeill, fortynine, saw the play and immediately went into cardiac arrest. Two firemen from Company No. 22, who just happened to be in the bar watching the game, rushed to ONeills aid and revived him.

The RCA Dome crowd was so loud that the players
eardrums begged for mercy. Manning had sixtyone seconds, three timeouts, and the conferences highestscoring offense at his disposal. He needed 25 to 30 yards to move into feasible field goal range, 58 yards to win the game outright.

Ilkin, in need of a hug, later asked sideline reporter Craig Wolfley for an update.

Well, guys, Im just standing here, just watching Jerome Bettis,said Wolfley.I’ve been watching him the last minute or two, and for such an unbelievable career, for such a great leader for the Steelers, this has got to be one of those moments that you just cant believe. Its like a nightmarish moment. He was on his knee, and just the look on his face just said everything about what he was feeling at this time.


No, it didn’t. It couldn’t.

For thirteen years I had left bits and pieces of myself on NFL football fields from Pittsburgh to San Francisco, all for the chance—just the chance—to play in a Super Bowl. That’s 13,662 yards, and who knows how many punishing hits, just for the opportunity to reach the pinnacle of my profession. And this one, Super Bowl XL, was going to be in the city where I was born and raised, the city where I carried my first football, where I played my high school ball, where my parents still lived, where I still had deep, strong roots.

Now, in only a few seconds’ time, my last chance at realizing my ultimate football dream was in serious jeopardy. And it was my fault. All my fault.

All playoff games are special, but this one meant more to us because about six weeks earlier we had gotten our asses beat by the Colts. And I mean beat—26–7 at the RCA Dome. Now we had a rematch.

Before the game, everybody was talking trash. While we were going through our pregame warm–ups in the end zone, some of the Colts fans started yapping at us. I let them yap, but then I told them, “I’ll be back to see you soon, real soon.”

I don’t usually mouth off to fans, but I felt so good I couldn’t contain myself. I wanted them to know I’d be in the end zone again, but I'd have a football in my hands and a touchdown on the scoreboard.

From the opening snap we unleashed everything we had and led, 14–0, at the end of the first quarter. The Colts fans behind our bench were jawing at me, and I was jawing back.

“Aw, you wasn’t expecting this, were you?” I said. “Uh–huh. What a difference a day makes.”

I was playing with them, but there wasn’t much they could say back. They were frustrated with their team, and we were the ones responsible for the frustration.

Then, late in the third quarter, I dove into the end zone on a 1–yard touchdown run to put us ahead, 21–3. I’d warned those Colts fans I’d visit them again.

I let out a huge scream. You could see the dejection in the fans’ faces. They didn’t expect us to come in there and dominate the game.

Oh, I was going crazy. It was so sweet. Then the Colts scored early in the fourth quarter, but we were still up, 21–10. No problem.

Back and forth it went until Troy Polamalu intercepted a Manning pass near midfield with 5:33 left in the game. I was thinking to myself, “OK, we can seal the deal. This is my time now. Time to pound the ball, get the tough yards, squeeze the life out of the clock and the Colts.”

I started to run onto the field, but then the officials told us that Colts coach Tony Dungy was challenging the call. Huh? What was there to challenge? Manning threw it. Troy intercepted it. Our ball.

Except that referee Pete Morelli looked at the replay and said—and I still can’t believe this—that Troy didn’t have possession of the ball. Incomplete pass. Whoa, what was going on here?

The NFL would later say Morelli made a mistake, that the interception shouldn’t have been overturned. But that didn’t help us then.

I went back to the sideline and watched nervously as Manning hit a 9–yard pass, a 20–yard pass, a 24–yard pass. Bam, bam, bam. Then Edgerrin James scored on a 3–yard run. Then Manning hit Reggie Wayne for the two–point conversion. It was, 21–18, and here we go.

Later, with 1:27 left and the ball at the Colts’ 12, Joey Porter sacked Manning for a 10–yard loss on fourth down. I watched the whole thing from the sideline and it was such a perfect moment. Time for me to go to work.

But first I had to do some bragging. Like I said, I hardly ever popped off during a game, but I couldn’t help myself this time. I ran out on the field and when I saw Colts defensive tackle Corey Simon, I just went off on him.

“We shocked the world!” I said. “Yeah, I knew you wasn’t ready for this. Y’all didn’t think we had anything coming in.”

I saw Colts linebacker Cato June and I started lipping off to him too.

“Yeah, y’all came in talking all that talk…thought it was going to be that same old stuff. Uh–uh.”

This was totally not me. I was rubbing it in their faces.

So we got in the huddle and I knew I was getting the ball. I told myself, “OK, Bus, it’s on now.” I was ready to punch it in. Ben called the play: Counter 38 Power.

This was our money play. We called it, the bread and butter play. In fact, we ran that play so much over the years that our offensive line coach, Russ Grimm, would look at me from the sidelines and start moving his right hand over his left palm, like he was buttering a slice of bread. Time for Counter 38 Power.

Ben took the snap. I took the handoff.

The way the play was supposed to work was like this: I take a jab step to the left, then go to the right and get the ball from Ben. My right guard blocks down, the right tackle blocks down. My left guard, Alan Faneca, pulls around and kicks out the defender, and I run inside his block.

But on that play, Faneca decided to turn up a little bit early. He thought he saw a hole inside and decided to turn up that way. Faneca had been to five Pro Bowls and was one of the best in the business. If he thought he saw a hole, then that was fine by me.

The problem was, with him turning upfield early, I got no kick–out block on the linebacker, and that linebacker, Gary Brackett, was just sitting there waiting for me. So I decided to try to squeeze inside him. I knew I could still score, but I had to cut back inside. I’d made the same move thousands of times in my career.

So I sort of turned my body sideways and Brackett shot over and delivered a perfect hit. I’ve got gigantic hands and it just about takes a sledgehammer to get the ball out of my hold. But Brackett’s helmet hit the ball flush. An absolutely perfect hit. In fact, if you look at the replay, it’s not like I was being careless with it. I still had my hand cupped over where the ball used to be.

I felt the ball pop out, but I couldn’t see it. Brackett had me by the knees and I was falling backward toward the goal line. I was trying to find the ball on the turf. I figured it was somewhere near my feet. It’s weird: In that split second that I was falling I thought, “Well, at the very worst they’ll recover the fumble on the 3–yard line and they’ll still have to drive 97 yards for the win.”

Just as I was about to hit the ground I saw the ball. It wasn’t on the turf—it was still floating in the air! Then I saw Nick Harper, who played cornerback, grab it after the ball bounced off the turf at the 7 and I’m thinking, “Oh, my God. Oh, my God. I don’t believe I just fumbled the football. I cannot believe I just fumbled the football.”

At first, everything was in slow motion. It was like that movie The Untouchables, when the baby carriage is rolling down the train station steps and a gunfight breaks out. When I finally saw the ball in the air my mind was screaming, “No–oooooooo!” But I couldn’t stop what was happening. I was completely helpless.

Then I saw Harper break free, and suddenly the only things in slow motion were the guys chasing him. We had our goal–line unit—a lot of 300–pounders—in the game, so the chances of somebody catching him from behind weren’t good. I saw Kendall Simmons, our 315–pound guard, chasing after him. I saw our fullback, Dan Kreider, doing the same thing. And I saw Ben in the distance. And me? I was on my butt, and by myself (most of the Colts defenders had sprinted off to try to block for Harper). I was a lonely, lonely soul.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 12 )
Rating Distribution

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(8)

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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 3, 2009

    Jerome Bettis Bio

    This book is a great inspiration and helps you see that when you put your mind to something anything is possible. When I read this book I said wow here¿s a guy who grew up in Detroit in a gang and turned around and said hey I can do better than this and he did he became a great football player a great inspiration and a great role model. The really great players are the ones who are successful off the field and give to charities like Jerome does. I recommend this book because if you want inspiration this book has plenty of it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2008

    A reviewer

    Jerome's personality comes through on every page. His work ethic, both personally and professionally, is admirable. As a fan, it's delightful to learn that someone in the public eye is as nice as you imagine. He also teaches good lessons to youth growing up in tough situations. Bravo! A great behind-the-scenes read for any football fan.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 22, 2011

    Climb aboard, The Bus is rolling!

    Great book about a great Steeler legend. Shows the heart of this champion.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2012

    The Bus real name is Jerome Bettis, He is called the Bus bec

    The Bus real name is Jerome Bettis, He is called the Bus because he is built for the position that he plays. He has won many awards, but his main one is that he win Pro Football's Most beloved and respected. Growing up he wanted to be a bowler, but he ended up being a football player.
    This book was not that hard to read, just some of the words were challenging.
    If you like about reading about sports, this book would be a great book for you. I give this book a 4 star because, it was very interesting.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2012

    I love the bus!!!!!

    Even know I did not read this book I am such a big fan of his and I had to make a comment on it so who ever wrote this book I think you made a good choice on what football player to choise so that is why I made a comment.
    Josh miller!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2011

    Reread!!

    I both the book and this i read them over and over

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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