Bush League Diplomacy: How the Neoconservatives Are Putting the World at Risk

Bush League Diplomacy: How the Neoconservatives Are Putting the World at Risk

by Craig R. Eisendrath
     
 

Fifty years ago, the United States founded the United Nations, promoted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, used economic aid as a tool for creating stability, and viewed collective agreements and cooperation as the principal methods of sharing the costs and the risks of security. Today, under the leadership of George W. Bush, the main tool of foreign policy is… See more details below

Overview

Fifty years ago, the United States founded the United Nations, promoted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, used economic aid as a tool for creating stability, and viewed collective agreements and cooperation as the principal methods of sharing the costs and the risks of security. Today, under the leadership of George W. Bush, the main tool of foreign policy is military force, not diplomacy. America is going it alone, and paying the price, both abroad and at home.
In this comprehensive critique of the Bush administration's handling of international relations, Craig R. Eisendrath and Melvin A. Goodman, both senior fellows at the Center for International Policy, demonstrate the folly and the dangers of abandoning diplomacy and relying on military force as the chief means of conducting U.S. foreign policy. The authors argue that a policy of bullying will sow seeds of resentment and mistrust among our potential allies and encourage nations hostile to our interests to seek nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction as a last-resort method of protecting themselves against a belligerent world power. Eisendrath and Goodman foresee the international community becoming dangerously unstable, not more secure, under a Pax Americana maintained by military might.
On the domestic front, the authors warn that a policy emphasizing the power of the executive branch at the expense of Congress, and suspending long-standing civil rights under the pretext of national security, threatens the Constitution. Finally, the economic effect of huge military expenditures financed by deficit spending has the potential of eroding domestic tranquility for decades.
This trenchant review by two experienced foreign policy analysts will serve as a wake-up call to the dangerous militarism at the heart of the Bush agenda.

Craig Eisendrath (Philadelphia, PA), a former diplomat, is a senior fellow at the Center for International Policy in Washington, D.C.; an adjunct professor a Temple University; the author (with Melvin A. Goodman and Gerald E. Marsh) of The Phantom Defense: America's Pursuit of the Star Wars Illusion, among other books; and the editor of National Insecurity: U.S. Intelligence After the Cold War.

Melvin A. Goodman (Washington, D.C.), a former CIA official, is a senior fellow at the Center for International Policy; chairman of the International Relations Department at the National War College; and an author of books on defense and international relations.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781616140007
Publisher:
Prometheus Books
Publication date:
03/01/2004
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

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