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Business @ the Speed of Thought: Succeeding in the Digital Economy
     

Business @ the Speed of Thought: Succeeding in the Digital Economy

4.3 4
by Bill Gates, Collins Hemingway, Collins Hemingway (With)
 

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In his new book, Microsoft chairman and CEO Bill Gates discusses how technology can help run businesses better today and how it will transform the nature of business in the near future. Gates stresses the need for managers to view technology not as overhead but as a strategic asset, and offers detailed examples from Microsoft, GM, Dell, and many other successful

Overview

In his new book, Microsoft chairman and CEO Bill Gates discusses how technology can help run businesses better today and how it will transform the nature of business in the near future. Gates stresses the need for managers to view technology not as overhead but as a strategic asset, and offers detailed examples from Microsoft, GM, Dell, and many other successful companies. Companion Web site.

Editorial Reviews

USA Today
This book lays out a road map for managers trying to build their own businesses into an era where information flows as fast as light through a fiberoptic cable.
BusinessWeek
For CEOs and other executives, it is a clear, richly detailed guide to the fast-emerging E-business Age.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780446525688
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
Publication date:
03/01/1999
Pages:
496
Sales rank:
398,985
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.25(d)
Age Range:
13 Years

Meet the Author

BILL GATES is the chairman and chief executive officer at Microsoft Corporation. His vision and commitment regarding personal computing have been central to the success of Microsoft and in the advancement of software technology. He lives with his wife, Melinda, and daughter, Jennifer, in the Seattle area.

COLLINS HEMINGWAY is director of executive communications at Microsoft Corporation. He had been involved with Microsoft's systems products since 1987 and from 1994 to 1996 was director of international and partner marketing for the Personal and Business Systems Division.

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Business @ the Speed of Thought: Succeeding in the Digital Economy 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although certainly not perfect, this book is outstanding for communicating with enthusiasm the vision of what computers can already do for business, almost anyone's business.
Guest More than 1 year ago
We found the concepts in Gates & Hemingway (2000) ¿Business at the Speed of Thought: Succeeding in the Digital Economy¿ interesting and helpful for business planning and development. Creating a ¿digital nervous system¿ seems a lofty ideal and a little too technical and impersonal though. We would have liked to see more business examples outside of the Microsoft examples they cited. What we also liked about this book is that it offers a brief glimpse into the mind and thinking of one of the most successful businessman in history. For anyone interested in business/leadership biography, this is a worthwhile read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Discussing the digital flow of information in a company would sound to some like a horrible book to read. Not so, with this book. Gates finds simply analogies to explain why the flow of communication is so important and how managing electronic information can be made not only efficient, but simple. His enthusiasm comes through clearly as he reveals not only his twelve steps to manage digital information, but also the practical applications of flow management. I found this book easy to understand and very helpful at pointing out ways to better manage my own email and the ways I communicate information to committees and employees.
Guest More than 1 year ago
BUSINESS @ THE SPEED OF THOUGHT clearly shows the risk of creating even more harm from GARBAGE IN, GARBAGE OUT. The electronic revolution will create reinforcement for all of the bad habits that organizations have. If they now use obsolete analyses in some areas, the new technology will be sure that everyone does this. If the organization is now ignoring some areas in its measurements, new software will be certain to keep that in place. If you have old-style accounting rather than Activity-Based Costing, you will be able to manipulate the wrong numbers faster. And so forth. Many organizations will totally fail in this new environment because the new technology will become disabling rather than enabling. For example, the new technology will cause you to be much more intimate with your customers. In that process, you may totally ignore those who do not buy your product (a vastly larger group), and your catering to current customer needs may make it harder to gain market share with new customers who have different needs. I think Gates is right about what he is forecasting, so you had better first work on getting rid of your organization's bad habits, and replace them with better ones. Then you should eliminate as much as you can, simplify the rest, outsource all but the key tasks (and even those if someone can do them much better than you can), then automate what remains. If you want good advice on how to do this, you should read 'The 2,000 Percent Solution' before you implement Microsoft's view of the future.