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Business Wisdom of the Electronic Elite: COMPAQ, Sun, Hewlett-Packard, and Other Top Companies
     

Business Wisdom of the Electronic Elite: COMPAQ, Sun, Hewlett-Packard, and Other Top Companies

by Geoffrey James
 
This book offers a composite of the best management methods of some of the most innovative leaders in industry today. The author has spent months interviewing senior high-tech executives including Bill Gates of Microsoft, Lewis Platt of Hewlett-Packard, Jim Manzi of Lotus, Ann Winblad, the high-tech venture capitalist and others to find out why their companies have

Overview

This book offers a composite of the best management methods of some of the most innovative leaders in industry today. The author has spent months interviewing senior high-tech executives including Bill Gates of Microsoft, Lewis Platt of Hewlett-Packard, Jim Manzi of Lotus, Ann Winblad, the high-tech venture capitalist and others to find out why their companies have been able to maintain a competitive edge and high level of profitability in today's fierce marketplace.

The key themes of the book are the comparison of industrial age management to information age styles and the exploration of links between corporate culture and the effective use of technology in the organization. The electronic elite's leadership wisdom is revealed in six new paradigms for managing—all of which are explained through interviews and lively examples. They are:
1) business=ecosystem
2) corporation=community
3) managment=service
4) employees=peers
5) work=fun
6) change=pleasure
Each section ends with an action plan for the reader to take into his or her personal business situation

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Members of the electronic eliteyoung entrepreneurs like Bill Gates, chairman of Microsofthave seized on the advent of microprocessors to develop affordable personal computers that have left old-guard mainframe and minicomputer vendors agape. They arrived as upstarts; Gates was a college dropout; Mitch Kapor, founder of Lotus, a meditation teacher. They brought with them a new corporate culture, overturning traditional mindsets. The workplace, once a battlefield, becomes an ecosystem made up of symbiotic relationships. Workers on the loading dock are peers and on a first-name basis with the guys in the boardroom. They all dress informally, and at companies like Microsoft, employee motivation is fueled not by fear but by shared vision and stock options. Readers looking for hard criticism of Silicon Valley company policies will find it in short supply here. But James (The Tao of Programming) mounts a persuasive case that the elite companies' greatest legacy may be their new business culture and he admonishes workers on all levels to "be part of that transformation!" This succinct overview contains interviews with CEOs and end-of-chapter exercises. Illustrations. (June)
Library Journal
James (The Tao of Programming, Infobooks, 1987) describes the business strategies used by successful high-tech companies. Based on a new "corporate culture," these companies emphasize respect for the individual and value freedom and creativity over traditional corporate hierarchy and militaristic operations. James offers 34 business strategies to contrast with traditional corporate culture. These include "make work fun," "create a climate of trust," and "imagine the possibilities." The text is sprinkled with quotes from top CEOs such as Bill Gates of Microsoft. Each chapter ends with an action plan to assist in implementing the desired change. Although several recent books cover the business strategies of high-tech companies (e.g., Michael McGrath's Product Strategy for High Technology Companies, Irwin, 1994), none deals specifically with the issue of corporate culture. James shows persuasively how the concept of corporate culture can make a difference in this context. Recommended for business collections.Kathy Shimpock-Vieweg, Muchmore & Wallwork Lib., Phoenix, Ariz.
David Rouse
James proclaims that the archetype of the authoritarian manager has been supplanted by new leadership, best represented by those who run today's successful computer and software companies. James is a business and technical writer for computer and trade journals and author of "The Tao of Programming" (1987). Using examples drawn from companies such as Compaq, Novell, Lotus, and Intuit, and from interviews with 15 leading CEOs, including Bill Gates, he identifies 34 new management strategies, contrasting them with what he calls "traditional mindsets." For example, in this new corporate culture, business is seen as an ecosystem rather than a battlefield; managers serve rather than control. A major advertising and promotion campaign should generate interest in this title.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780812963793
Publisher:
Crown Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/28/1996
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
6.46(w) x 9.65(h) x 0.97(d)

Meet the Author

Geoffrey James has served on the adjunct faculty of Boston University, has taught courses at UCLA, the University of California at Santa Cruz, and the University of Washington, and is a magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of California at Irvine. In addition to writing books of light humor such as The Tao of Programming, he has published numerous articles on management and technology, and is a frequent speaker at international conferences.

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