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Buz
     

Buz

4.0 3
by Richard Egielski
 

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When a young boy accidentally swallows poor Buz , a bug, along with his morning cereal, he's prescribed two pills to remedy the situation. Little does he know what is going on inside! In his award-winning signature style, Richard Egielski invents an ingenious behind-the-scenes adventure of two keystone cop-like pills in pursuit of a bug inside a human body. Buz

Overview

When a young boy accidentally swallows poor Buz , a bug, along with his morning cereal, he's prescribed two pills to remedy the situation. Little does he know what is going on inside! In his award-winning signature style, Richard Egielski invents an ingenious behind-the-scenes adventure of two keystone cop-like pills in pursuit of a bug inside a human body. Buz eventually makes his escape, only to discover he has caught a bug of his own. On with the chase!

New York Times Best Illustrated Book of 1995
1998 Young Reader's Choice Award, Pennsylvania An ABA Pick of the Lists

100 Titles for Reading and Sharing 1995 (NY Public Library)
1995 "Pick of the Lists" (ABA)
Children's Choices for 1996 (IRA/CBC)
Best Illustrated Children's Books of 1995 (NYT)
1995 Parent's Choice Silver Award for Picture Books
1998 PA Young Reader's Choice Award

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Telling the story of a boy who swallows a bug, Egielski "paints as if with a zoom lens, magnifying the mundane and creating a quirky, effectively claustrophobic universe," said PW. Ages 3-7. (Feb.)
Children's Literature - Judy Silverman
"One morning, Buz, a bug, was eaten along with a spoonful of cornflakes." With that simple sentence, Egielski draws us into the story of a chase through the human body. Buz escapes from molars, but the doctor says that the boy who swallowed him has "caught a bug." The pills the boy must take turn into Keystone Cops, and they chase Buz all around the boy's body. Egielski's playful drawings are great fun.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2One morning, a boy eats a bug along with his cornflakes. As the brief narrative unfolds, viewers glimpse the creature's journey through the boy's body, the doctor's confirmation of the presence of a ``bug,'' and the cops-and-robbers-like chase by the bumbling pills. Egielski makes effective use of double-page close-ups, interior and exterior perspectives, and page layout to build suspense and heighten dramatic impact. The pictures work well from a distance, so groups will enjoy them. The palette changes from fleshy pinks to shadowy blues as Buz moves away from the source of light. An abundance of white highlights on the pills and Buz creates the same shiny look used by the illustrator in Pam Conrad's The Tub People (HarperCollins, 1989), giving the characters a toylike quality. The little creature escapes, but not without catchinga germ. Guess what the doctor prescribes? This is probably not a title one will read again and again, but it is clever enough the first time through. Use it with Chris Van Allsburg's Two Bad Ants (Houghton, 1988) to portray unusual adventures from out-of-the-ordinary perspectives.Wendy Lukehart, Dauphin County Library, Harrisburg, PA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780064434799
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
02/28/1999
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
749,568
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.07(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Richard Egielski is the Caldecott Medal-winning illustrator of Hey, Al and many other books for children, including the Tub People series by Pam Conrad. He is also the author and illustrator of Buz and Jazper, both New York Times Best Illustrated Books, Three Magic Balls, and The Gingerbread Boy. Mr. Egielski lives in Milford, New Jersey, with his wife and son.

Richard Egielski is the Caldecott Medal-winning illustrator of Hey, Al and many other books for children, including the Tub People series by Pam Conrad. He is also the author and illustrator of Buz and Jazper, both New York Times Best Illustrated Books, Three Magic Balls, and The Gingerbread Boy. Mr. Egielski lives in Milford, New Jersey, with his wife and son.

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Buz 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was disappointing to me because of the illustrations as well as the story. It was frustratingly not close to my idea of a children's book. What was the point here? In my family we've been teaching our children about germs. There is something strange about pills with flashlights, forcing a bug to get into a capsule, and then see the bug flowting away in the bath tub and arriving home. Harmful bugs have a home? Okay it had a ditty at the end that was almost cute but I am just disappointed enough to not only give this book to the local thrift store but throw it away.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I TOOK THIS BOOK OUT OF THE LIBRARY & HAVE HAD TO KEEP RENEWING IT MY SON LOVES IT SO MUCH. NOW I AM GOING TO BUY IT! GREAT PICTURES & A FUNNY STORY EVEN GROWN UPS WILL LIKE HEARING & READING OVER & OVER & OVER AGAIN!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is wonderfully creative. I know the age suggestion is older, but I read it to my 8 month old and she loves it! The artwork is very good. It's just a great book. I would strongly recommend it for every kid's home library.