By Any Means Necessary

( 3 )

Overview

"The imperialists know the only way you will voluntarily turn to the fox is to show you a wolf." In eleven speeches and interviews, Malcolm X presents a revolutionary alternative to this reformist trap, taking up political alliances, women's rights, U.S. intervention in the Congo and Vietnam, capitalism and socialism, and more.

Introduction by Steve Clark, 8-page photo section, index. Now with enlarged type.

Speeches tracing the evolution of Malcolm X's views on ...

See more details below
This Hardcover is Not Available through BN.com
Sending request ...

Overview

"The imperialists know the only way you will voluntarily turn to the fox is to show you a wolf." In eleven speeches and interviews, Malcolm X presents a revolutionary alternative to this reformist trap, taking up political alliances, women's rights, U.S. intervention in the Congo and Vietnam, capitalism and socialism, and more.

Introduction by Steve Clark, 8-page photo section, index. Now with enlarged type.

Speeches tracing the evolution of Malcolm X's views on political alliances, intermarriage, women's rights, capitalism and socialism, and more. (Pathfinder)

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780873481458
  • Publisher: Pathfinder Press GA
  • Publication date: 5/1/1970

Table of Contents

Introduction
1 An interview by A.B. Spellman (New York, March 19, 1964) 1
2 Answers to questions at the Militant Labor Forum (New York, April 8, 1964) 14
3 The founding rally of the OAAU (New York, June 28, 1964) 33
4 Harlem and the political machines (New York, July 4, 1964) 69
5 The second rally of the OAAU (New York, July 5, 1964) 75
6 A letter from Cairo (Cairo, August 29, 1964) 108
7 At a meeting in Paris (Paris, November 23, 1964) 113
8 An exchange on casualties in the Congo (New York, November 28, 1964) 127
9 The homecoming rally of the OAAU (New York, November 29, 1964) 133
10 The Young Socialist Interview (New York, January 18, 1965) 157
11 On being barred from France (London, February 9, 1965) 167
12 Short statements (1964-1965) 175
Index 185
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2008

    X-cellent

    To this day I have read many memoirs, but to me there is one book that stands out. The book of Malcolm X¿s life showed how different people can become, through beliefs and experiences in their lifetime. Malcolm¿s life is a perfect example of a person with amelioration he changed his thoughts and beliefs throughout his life: Malcolm went from a jazz player, to a drug dealer, to a religious leader, to a cultural preacher. Malcolm Little was born in Harlem, New York and had a very tough home life as a kid. His father died as a fire fighter and his mother was an alcoholic. He endured many obstacles in his childhood including physical abuse. Malcolm was a very good student. When he was at school, instead of taking out his anger on kids, he would protect the weaker and less fortunate who was picked on. In school, he was not picked on, he just did not like the stuck up people who thought that they were better than other people. Malcolm discovered Jazz in his early 20¿s and Jazz became his life. He became completely engrossed in Jazz including the culture. This led to a drug use problem and he became a drug leader and took people¿s money while killing them. This was not the life that Malcolm intended to live. In the book he states, ¿I have done so many bad things in the past drug dealing ayears, that most days I wish I were caught.¿ It seems like his wishes had come true. He was caught and was put to jail for several years. In the time that he was in jail he studied many religions including the Nation of Islam. When he got out of jail, he quickly became a Muslim and he became an icon leader very quickly in America. He had many followers. Malcolm now did not enjoy the life he was having and how they studied the religion. At this point he was opposed to the Nation of Islam. Malcolm now focused on protesting for African American rights. He was a very good leader. He and Martin Luther King were great leaders. Malcolm was a violent leader, while Martin Luther King Jr. was a benevolent leader. In my opinion, Malcolm was very hypocritical he would do something and then be against it the next year. Malcolm X had a stunning ending that left me wanting more. This book kept me on my toes at all time and if there were a second I would read it with out thinking twice. I highly suggest this book to every single reader, young or adult.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2001

    Revolutionary Strategy Applicable Today

    By Any Means Necessary consists of lectures (including responses to audience questions) as well as interviews by reporters both hostile and friendly. Malcom's revolutionary strategy for confronting and overcoming the oppression of African-Americans in the 1960s is applicable today for the working class and oppressed people everywhere.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2001

    Want to know the real Malcolm X? Read his own words

    Much has been written about Malcolm X, perhaps the foremost black leader in the latter half of the 20th century. But the best way to really learn about Malcolm, I think, is to read his own words. Then read them again. Malcolm was - and remains - so very popular because he possessed the gift of being able to cut directly to the heart of issues. He could describe them in terms that people can immediately understand. His ability to do just that is aptly compiled in this collection of speeches and an interview in the Young Socialist magazine. Malcolm discusses the loathsome nature of capitalism, the folly of the Democratic Party and the interrelationship of struggles in the Third World to the fight for black rights in this country. While scholars have written much about Malcolm's abilities as a public speaker, this book shows that Malcolm was much more. He was a doer. He was an organizer of Harlem blacks, and he constantly urged black people elsewhere to fight for their rights. Ultimately, it was because of his deeds as well as his ideas for which he was slain.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)