By Design Or By Chance?

Overview

O'Leary provides by far the broadast overview yet of the ID movement. she quotes ID leaders such as Phillip Johnson, William Dembski and Michael Behe. she also quotes their sternest critics, including Richard Dawkins, Stephen J. Gould and Michael Ruse. She writes about the Wedge movement, DNA, the age of the Earth, the search for extraterrestrial life, the teaching of ID in schools, and the monarch butterfly. She anticipates the culmination of the ID revolution by writing that Darwinism "was part of our ...
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More About This Book

Overview

O'Leary provides by far the broadast overview yet of the ID movement. she quotes ID leaders such as Phillip Johnson, William Dembski and Michael Behe. she also quotes their sternest critics, including Richard Dawkins, Stephen J. Gould and Michael Ruse. She writes about the Wedge movement, DNA, the age of the Earth, the search for extraterrestrial life, the teaching of ID in schools, and the monarch butterfly. She anticipates the culmination of the ID revolution by writing that Darwinism "was part of our folklore." Yet the evolutionary tales she relates are still widely taught as fact in many schools.

This well organized guidebook of O'Leary's journey through the world of Intelligent Design has the potential to lead many of the next generation away from the evolutionary fables that now pass for science. Her book is must reading for anyone who wants to understand the history and significance of the Intelligent Design movement. It also belongs in college and even high school classrooms.

Forrest M. Mims III, U.S. science journalist

Denyse O'Leary has been a freelance writer since 1971. She specializes in science news of interest to faith communities for such publications as Christianity Today, Faith Today, and the Christian Times. She is the author of several titles including Faith@Science: Why Science Needs Faith in the Twenty-First Century, and it the Faith and Science columnist for ChristianWeek. She has written for newspapers, magazines, book publishers, and trade jounals, including the Globe & Mail, the Toronto Star, and Canadian Living.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781894860031
  • Publisher: BayRidge Books
  • Publication date: 4/27/2004
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.79 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2005

    what all the shouting is about

    Canadian journalist Denyse O¿Leary has been writing about science issues for years, so she is very familiar to many of us interested in science-religion topics. Her book was not written to attack evolution (or to advocate intelligent design) but to explain what all the shouting is about. It is aimed at a general audience, not a scientific or Christian one (although both groups would find this book very valuable). As she tells the story, in 1996, a political science professor based in Toronto urged her, as a journalist, to address the unseemly and unscholarly attacks on mathematician David Berlinski (who is an agnostic), for daring to question Darwinism. The result was this book. In the course of writing this book, she came to the conclusion that intelligent design is more plausible than Darwinism, as an explanation for the life we see around us. Nonetheless, the book is more about the controversey than to argue for one side or the other. It was easy to read yet very informative (even I learned something, and I have read most every book on this topic, for and against).

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