By Design: Planning Research on Higher Education

By Design: Planning Research on Higher Education

by Richard J. Light, Judith D. Singer, John B. Willett
     
 

Do students who work longer and harder learn more in college? Does joining a fraternity with a more academic flavor enhance a student's academic performance? These are just some more than fifty examples that Richard Light Judith Singer and John Willett explore in By Design, a lively nontechnical sourcebook for learning about colleges and universities.See more details below

Overview

Do students who work longer and harder learn more in college? Does joining a fraternity with a more academic flavor enhance a student's academic performance? These are just some more than fifty examples that Richard Light Judith Singer and John Willett explore in By Design, a lively nontechnical sourcebook for learning about colleges and universities.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780674089303
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Publication date:
03/28/1990
Pages:
296
Product dimensions:
6.37(w) x 9.55(h) x 0.99(d)

Table of Contents

1. Why Do Research On Higher Education?

Many Questions, Many Options

Our Philosophy of Research Design

How This Book is Organized

2. What Are Your Questions?

Why Are Research Questions So Important?

Getting Specific

Building on the Work of Others

Correlation versus Causation

The Wheel of Science

3. What Groups Do You Want to Study?

Specifying the Target Population

Where Should you Conduct the Study

Selecting Your Sample

More Than One Type of Respondent

Nonresponse Bias

4. What Predictors Do You Want to Study?

Types of Predictors

The Important Role of Variation

Other Reasons for Selecting Predictors

The Integrity of Your Treatment

Choosing Which Predictors to Study

5. Compared to What?

Why Do You Need a Comparison Group?

Randomized Control Groups: The Best Comparisons

Requiring Informed Consent

Volunteer Bias

Comparison Groups without Random Assignment

Retrospective Case-control Studies

Design Effects Can Swamp Treatment Effects

6. What Are Your Outcomes?

Different Kinds of Outcomes

Will You Measure Status or Development

Short-term versus Long-term Effects

Are Your Measures Valid?

7. How Can You Improve Your Measures?

What is Measurement Error?

Reliability and Measurement Error

Six Strategies for Improving Measurement Quality

Looking at Measurement Quality

8. How Many People Should You Study?

Why Is Sample Size So Important?

What Size Effect Do You Want to Detect?

What Type of Analysis Will You Use?

Instruments Precision and Sample Size

What If Students Drop Out?

9. Should You Try It out on a Small Scale?

The Advantages of Pilot Studies

Piloting Instruments

Relational Studies

Informal Small-scale Experiments

Generalizing From a Small Study

10. Where Should You Go From Here?

Getting Started

Lessons From Our Seminar

Decisions You Must Make

Planning a Longer-term Research Program

Reference

Index

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >