Byzantine Slavery and the Mediterranean World

Byzantine Slavery and the Mediterranean World

by Youval Rotman
     
 

Slavery may no longer exist as a legal institution, but we still find many forms of non-freedom in contemporary societies. Arguing against the use of the term “slavery” for any extreme form of social dependency, Rotman shows instead that slavery and freedom are unrelated concepts. His work offers a radical new understanding of the geopolitical and… See more details below

Overview

Slavery may no longer exist as a legal institution, but we still find many forms of non-freedom in contemporary societies. Arguing against the use of the term “slavery” for any extreme form of social dependency, Rotman shows instead that slavery and freedom are unrelated concepts. His work offers a radical new understanding of the geopolitical and religious dynamics that have defined and redefined slavery and freedom, in the past and in our own time.

Editorial Reviews

David Brion Davis
A highly original work that will be crucial reading for all historians concerned with the origins of the Mediterranean and Atlantic slave trades.
Evelyne Patlagean
Rotman's study is definitely groundbreaking...The topic of slavery had never been thoroughly and properly investigated, even while the fate of slavery was such a primary issue, from Marx to Marc Bloch and beyond, in the debate over the transition from the Roman Empire to medieval societies. That void was a challenge in itself. Rotman has brilliantly risen to it, and has produced an innovative study.
Benjamin Isaac
In this lucid and wide-ranging work, Rotman shows that the conventional belief that slavery ceases to be a relevant subject after the Roman period is no longer tenable. This is a major contribution to the understanding of the intricate, long-term evolution of the institution of slavery as it moves from Late Antiquity into the Middle Ages.
Glen W. Bowersock
This is a remarkable work, for which at present there is no competition. Rotman effectively bridges the transition from late antiquity to the Byzantine Empire and the Muslim Caliphate. He strikes a mortal blow to the popular view that slaves were no longer a productive economic force in late antiquity and beyond. In addition, he provides an essential counterweight to traditional accounts of the late antique colonate and the rise of serfdom in the West.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780674036116
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Publication date:
11/15/2009
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
328
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.30(d)

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What People are saying about this

This is a remarkable work, for which at present there is no competition. Rotman effectively bridges the transition from late antiquity to the Byzantine Empire and the Muslim Caliphate. He strikes a mortal blow to the popular view that slaves were no longer a productive economic force in late antiquity and beyond. In addition, he provides an essential counterweight to traditional accounts of the late antique colonate and the rise of serfdom in the West.
Benjamin Isaac
In this lucid and wide-ranging work, Rotman shows that the conventional belief that slavery ceases to be a relevant subject after the Roman period is no longer tenable. This is a major contribution to the understanding of the intricate, long-term evolution of the institution of slavery as it moves from Late Antiquity into the Middle Ages.
Benjamin Isaac, author of The Invention of Racism in Classical Antiquity
Evelyne Patlagean
Rotman's study is definitely groundbreaking...The topic of slavery had never been thoroughly and properly investigated, even while the fate of slavery was such a primary issue, from Marx to Marc Bloch and beyond, in the debate over the transition from the Roman Empire to medieval societies. That void was a challenge in itself. Rotman has brilliantly risen to it, and has produced an innovative study.
David Brion Davis
A highly original work that will be crucial reading for all historians concerned with the origins of the Mediterranean and Atlantic slave trades.
Glen W. Bowersock
This is a remarkable work, for which at present there is no competition. Rotman effectively bridges the transition from late antiquity to the Byzantine Empire and the Muslim Caliphate. He strikes a mortal blow to the popular view that slaves were no longer a productive economic force in late antiquity and beyond. In addition, he provides an essential counterweight to traditional accounts of the late antique colonate and the rise of serfdom in the West.

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