BN.com Gift Guide

C# 2010 for Programmers (Deitel Developer Series) / Edition 4

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$20.31
(Save 66%)
Est. Return Date: 02/23/2015
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$35.29
(Save 41%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $4.45
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 92%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (14) from $4.45   
  • New (6) from $34.17   
  • Used (8) from $4.45   

Overview

The professional programmer’s Deitel® guide to C# 2010 and the powerful Microsoft® .NET 4 Framework

Written for programmers with a background in C++, Java or other high-level, object-oriented languages, this book applies the Deitel signature live-code approach to teaching programming and explores Microsoft’s C# 2010 language and .NET 4 in depth. The book is updated for Visual Studio® 2010 and C# 4, and presents C# concepts in the context of fully tested programs, complete with syntax shading, detailed line-by-line code descriptions and program outputs. The book features 200+ C# applications with 17,000+ lines of proven C# code, as well as hundreds of programming tips that will help you build robust applications.

Start with a concise introduction to C# fundamentals using an early classes and objects approach, then rapidly move on to more advanced topics, including multithreading, .NET 4, LINQ, WPF, ASP.NET 4, WCF web services and Silverlight®. Along the way you’ll enjoy the Deitels’ classic treatment of object-oriented programming and the OOD/UML® ATM case study, including a complete C# implementation. When you’re finished, you’ll be ready to build next-generation Windows applications, web applications and web services.

Check out the related LiveLessons video product, C# 2010 Fundamentals: Parts I, II and III, containing 20+ hours of video synchronized to this book: www.deitel.com/livelessons.

Practical, example-rich coverage of:

  • .NET 4, Types, Arrays, Exception Handling
  • LINQ, Object/Collection Initializers
  • OOP: Classes, Objects, Inheritance, Polymorphism, Interfaces
  • WinForms, WPF, XAML, Event Handling
  • WPF GUI/Graphics/Multimedia
  • Silverlight®
  • Lists, Queues, Stacks, Trees
  • Generic Collections, Methods and Classes
  • XML®, LINQ to XML
  • Database, LINQ to SQL
  • ASP.NET 4.0, ASP.NET AJAX
  • Web Forms, Web Controls
  • WCF Web Services
  • OOD/UML® Case Study

Visit www.deitel.com

  • For information on Deitel’s Dive Into® training courses offered worldwide visit www.deitel.com/training
  • To license Deitel book and/or LiveLessons video content for your learning management system, e-mail deitel@deitel.com
  • Download code examples
  • Follow Deitel on Twitter® @deitel and Facebook® at www.deitel.com/deitelfan/
  • To receive updates for this book, subscribe to the free Deitel® Buzz Online e-mail newsletter at www.deitel.com/newsletter/subscribe.html

Testimonials from the Third and Fourth Edition Reviewers

“Takes you from zero to the highest levels of C# programming proficiency. The pedagogical approach and wealth of online material guarantee this book an outstanding place among its peers. The best presentation on inheritance, interfaces and polymorphism I have seen in my 25+ years as a trainer and consultant! Superbly clear.”

—Octavio Hernandez, Microsoft C# MVP, Advanced Bionics

“The ultimate, comprehensive book that teaches you how to program using the latest Microsoft technologies. Excellent explanations, lots of examples, all the necessary theoretical background and all the latest technologies for desktop, web and databases. The best overview of Silverlight.”

—Kirill Osenkov, Visual Studio Languages Team, Microsoft

“Illustrates the best practices of C# programming.”

—Mingsheng Hong, Cornell University

“Excellent introduction to the world of .NET for the beginning C# programmer, using the Deitels’ live-code approach and real-world examples.”

—Bonnie Berent, Microsoft C# MVP

“Shows the practical application of the most recent topics in C# development. A gentle introduction to LINQ and the .NET collection classes; I like it very much! Shows a lot of useful basic techniques and most of the ‘second level facts’ needed to develop WinForms apps. I like the way you introduce working with databases using LINQ to SQL. Excellent introduction to ASP.NET. A very good introduction to generics. Outstanding chapter on collections; the discussion of the new co- and contra-variance capabilities is by necessity short, but very nice.”

—Octavio Hernandez, Microsoft C# MVP, Advanced Bionics

“The code examples provide a very good start on C# programming. A good job explaining the concepts of classes and objects in plain English. The arrays chapter is well done. A nice introduction to LINQ and Collections. The code examples in the chapter on polymorphism and interfaces are excellent. Important exception-related topics are explained with good examples.”

—Zijiang (James) Yang, Western Michigan University

“Teaches how to ‘program in the large,’ with material on object-oriented programming and software engineering principles.”

—Mingsheng Hong, Cornell University

“An excellent, true objects-first book. Excellent introduction to data structures and collections. The generics material is a real asset.”

—Gavin Osborne, Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology

“Great chapter on polymorphism.”

—Eric Lippert, Microsoft

“Excellent chapter on exceptions. Very good chapter on Winforms GUIs.”

—Marcelo Guerra Hahn, Microsoft

“Updated contents cover the most important additions to the language while maintaining the Deitels’ well-known high-quality. The early introduction to classes and objects is brilliant. I especially like the explanation of properties, and the discussion of value types vs. reference types. [Classes and Objects: A Deeper Look] does a really good job providing good practices for accessing private data and reusing code. The [Data Structures] chapter is very well written. Coverage of ASP.NET is exceptional.”

—José Antonio González Seco, Parliament of Andalusia, Spain

“Perfect for professionals. Thorough introductions to the debugger and LINQ.”

—Vinay Ahuja, Architect, Microsoft Corporation

“The TV/Video Viewer will enthuse readers and help them see how graphics effects can be created easily in WPF.”

—Ged Mead, Microsoft MVP, DevCity.Net

“An excellent introduction to XML, LINQ to XML and related technologies.”—Helena Kotas, Microsoft

“Good overview of relational databases. It hits on the right LINQ to SQL idioms.”

—Alex Turner, Microsoft

“Great overview of producing and consuming web services with WCF.”

—Dan Crevier, Microsoft

[Chapter 24: GUI with Windows Presentation Foundation] “This chapter is very well written. I especially liked your coverage of GUI customization and data bindings, which is very clear.”

—José Antonio González Seco, Parliament of Andalusia, Spain

[Chapter 24: GUI with Windows Presentation Foundation] “Excellent chapter! Everything is laid out right so that every required bit of knowledge is already there when needed.”

—Octavio Hernandez, Microsoft C# MVP, Advanced Bionics

[Chapter 25: WPF Graphics and Multimedia] “An already excellent chapter that got even better! This chapter perfectly complements the previous one, and offers great examples and explanations. The new example on speech synthesis and speech recognition is very nice, and the very first I’ve seen in any C# book to date.”

—Octavio Hernandez, Microsoft C# MVP, Advanced Bionics

[Chapter 26: XML and LINQ to XML]

“Excellent chapter! The presentation of LINQ to XML is fabulous!”

—Octavio Hernandez, Microsoft C# MVP, Advanced Bionics

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780132618205
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 11/12/2010
  • Series: Deitel Developer Series
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 1199
  • Sales rank: 979,897
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Paul Deitel and Harvey Deitel are the founders of Deitel & Associates, Inc., the internationally recognized programming languages authoring and corporate-training organization. Millions of people worldwide have used Deitel books and LiveLessons videos to master C#, C++, Java™, C, iPhone app development, Internet and web programming, JavaScript, XML, Visual Basic®, Visual C++®, Perl, Python and more. Paul Deitel is also a Microsoft C# MVP.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface xxi

Before You Begin xxxiv


Chapter 1: Introduction 1

1.1 Introduction 2

1.2 Microsoft’s Windows® Operating System 2

1.3 C, C++, Objective-C and Java 3

1.4 C# 3

1.5 Extensible Markup Language (XML) 4

1.6 Introduction to Microsoft .NET 4

1.7 The .NET Framework and the Common Language Runtime 4

1.8 Test-Driving the Advanced Painter Application 5

1.9 Introduction to Object Technology 8

1.10 Wrap-Up 10

Chapter 2: Dive Into® Visual C# 2010 Express 11

2.1 Introduction 12

2.2 Overview of the Visual Studio 2010 IDE 12

2.3 Menu Bar and Toolbar 17

2.4 Navigating the Visual Studio IDE 19

2.5 Using Help 24

2.6 Using Visual Programming to Create a Simple Program that Displays Text and an Image 27

2.7 Wrap-Up 38

2.8 Web Resources 39

Chapter 3: Introduction to C# Applications 40

3.1 Introduction 41

3.2 A Simple C# Application: Displaying a Line of Text 41

3.3 Creating a Simple Application in Visual C# Express 46

3.4 Modifying Your Simple C# Application 53

3.5 Formatting Text with Console.Write and Console.WriteLine 56

3.6 Another C# Application: Adding Integers 57

3.7 Arithmetic 59

3.8 Decision Making: Equality and Relational Operators 61

3.9 Wrap-Up 65

Chapter 4: Introduction to Classes and Objects 66

4.1 Introduction 67

4.2 Classes, Objects, Methods, Properties and Instance Variables 67

4.3 Declaring a Class with a Method and Instantiating an Object of a Class 68

4.4 Declaring a Method with a Parameter 72

4.5 Instance Variables and Properties 75

4.6 UML Class Diagram with a Property 80

4.7 Software Engineering with Properties and set and get Accessors 81

4.8 Auto-Implemented Properties 82

4.9 Value Types vs. Reference Types 83

4.10 Initializing Objects with Constructors 84

4.11 Floating-Point Numbers and Type decimal 87

4.12 Wrap-Up 93

Chapter 5: Control Statements: Part 1 94

5.1 Introduction 95

5.2 Control Structures 95

5.3 if Single-Selection Statement 97

5.4 if…else Double-Selection Statement 98

5.5 while Repetition Statement 102

5.6 Counter-Controlled Repetition 103

5.7 Sentinel-Controlled Repetition 107

5.8 Nested Control Statements 112

5.9 Compound Assignment Operators 115

5.10 Increment and Decrement Operators 115

5.11 Simple Types 118

5.12 Wrap-Up 119

Chapter 6: Control Statements: Part 2 120

6.1 Introduction 121

6.2 Essentials of Counter-Controlled Repetition 121

6.3 for Repetition Statement 122

6.4 Examples Using the for Statement 127

6.5 do…while Repetition Statement 131

6.6 switch Multiple-Selection Statement 132

6.7 break and continue Statements 140

6.8 Logical Operators 142

6.9 Wrap-Up 148

Chapter 7: Methods: A Deeper Look 149

7.1 Introduction 150

7.2 Packaging Code in C# 150

7.3 static Methods, static Variables and Class Math 151

7.4 Declaring Methods with Multiple Parameters 154

7.5 Notes on Declaring and Using Methods 157

7.6 Method-Call Stack and Activation Records 158

7.7 Argument Promotion and Casting 159

7.8 The .NET Framework Class Library 160

7.9 Case Study: Random-Number Generation 162

7.10 Case Study: A Game of Chance (Introducing Enumerations) 167

7.11 Scope of Declarations 172

7.12 Method Overloading 174

7.13 Optional Parameters 177

7.14 Named Parameters 178

7.15 Recursion 179

7.16 Passing Arguments: Pass-by-Value vs. Pass-by-Reference 182

7.17 Wrap-Up 185

Chapter 8: Arrays 187

8.1 Introduction 188

8.2 Arrays 188

8.3 Declaring and Creating Arrays 189

8.4 Examples Using Arrays 190

8.5 Case Study: Card Shuffling and Dealing Simulation 199

8.6 foreach Statement 203

8.7 Passing Arrays and Array Elements to Methods 205

8.8 Passing Arrays by Value and by Reference 208

8.9 Case Study: Class GradeBook Using an Array to Store Grades 212

8.10 Multidimensional Arrays 217

8.11 Case Study: GradeBook Using a Rectangular Array 222

8.12 Variable-Length Argument Lists 227

8.13 Using Command-Line Arguments 229

8.14 Wrap-Up 231

Chapter 9: Introduction to LINQ and the List Collection 232

9.1 Introduction 233

9.2 Querying an Array of int Values Using LINQ 234

9.3 Querying an Array of Employee Objects Using LINQ 238

9.4 Introduction to Collections 243

9.5 Querying a Generic Collection Using LINQ 246

9.6 Wrap-Up 248

9.7 Deitel LINQ Resource Center 248

Chapter 10: Classes and Objects: A Deeper Look 249

10.1 Introduction 250

10.2 Time Class Case Study 250

10.3 Controlling Access to Members 254

10.4 Referring to the Current Object’s Members with the this Reference 255

10.5 Indexers 257

10.6 Time Class Case Study: Overloaded Constructors 261

10.7 Default and Parameterless Constructors 267

10.8 Composition 267

10.9 Garbage Collection and Destructors 270

10.10 static Class Members 271

10.11 readonly Instance Variables 275

10.12 Data Abstraction and Encapsulation 276

10.13 Time Class Case Study: Creating Class Libraries 277

10.14 internal Access 282

10.15 Class View and Object Browser 283

10.16 Object Initializers 285

10.17 Time Class Case Study: Extension Methods 288

10.18 Delegates 291

10.19 Lambda Expressions 293

10.20 Anonymous Types 296

10.21 Wrap-Up 298

Chapter 11: Object-Oriented Programming: Inheritance 300

11.1 Introduction 301

11.2 Base Classes and Derived Classes 302

11.3 protected Members 304

11.4 Relationship between Base Classes and Derived Classes 305

11.5 Constructors in Derived Classes 329

11.6 Software Engineering with Inheritance 329

11.7 Class object 330

11.8 Wrap-Up 331

Chapter 12: OOP: Polymorphism, Interfaces and Operator Overloading 332

12.1 Introduction 333

12.2 Polymorphism Examples 335

12.3 Demonstrating Polymorphic Behavior 336

12.4 Abstract Classes and Methods 339

12.5 Case Study: Payroll System Using Polymorphism 341

12.6 sealed Methods and Classes 357

12.7 Case Study: Creating and Using Interfaces 357

12.8 Operator Overloading 368

12.9 Wrap-Up 371

Chapter 13: Exception Handling 372

13.1 Introduction 373

13.2 Example: Divide by Zero without Exception Handling 373

13.3 Example: Handling DivideByZeroExceptions and FormatExceptions 376

13.4 .NET Exception Hierarchy 381

13.5 finally Block 383

13.6 The using Statement 389

13.7 Exception Properties 390

13.8 User-Defined Exception Classes 395

13.9 Wrap-Up 398

Chapter 14: Graphical User Interfaces with Windows Forms: Part 1 399

14.1 Introduction 400

14.2 Windows Forms 401

14.3 Event Handling 403

14.4 Control Properties and Layout 410

14.5 Labels, TextBoxes and Buttons 414

14.6 GroupBoxes and Panels 417

14.7 CheckBoxes and RadioButtons 420

14.8 PictureBoxes 428

14.9 ToolTips 430

14.10 NumericUpDown Control 432

14.11 Mouse-Event Handling 434

14.12 Keyboard-Event Handling 437

14.13 Wrap-Up 440

Chapter 15: Graphical User Interfaces with Windows Forms: Part 2 441

15.1 Introduction 442

15.2 Menus 442

15.3 MonthCalendar Control 451

15.4 DateTimePicker Control 452

15.5 LinkLabel Control 455

15.6 ListBox Control 459

15.7 CheckedListBox Control 463

15.8 ComboBox Control 466

15.9 TreeView Control 470

15.10 ListView Control 475

15.11 TabControl Control 481

15.12 Multiple Document Interface (MDI) Windows 486

15.13 Visual Inheritance 493

15.14 User-Defined Controls 498

15.15 Wrap-Up 502

Chapter 16: Strings and Characters 504

16.1 Introduction 505

16.2 Fundamentals of Characters and Strings 506

16.3 string Constructors 507

16.4 string Indexer, Length Property and CopyTo Method 508

16.5 Comparing strings 509

16.6 Locating Characters and Substrings in strings 512

16.7 Extracting Substrings from strings 515

16.8 Concatenating strings 516

16.9 Miscellaneous string Methods 517

16.10 Class StringBuilder 518

16.11 Length and Capacity Properties, EnsureCapacity Method and Indexer of Class StringBuilder 519

16.12 Append and AppendFormat Methods of Class StringBuilder 521

16.13 Insert, Remove and Replace Methods of Class StringBuilder 523

16.14 Char Methods 526

16.15 Regular Expressions 528

16.16 Wrap-Up 542

Chapter 17: Files and Streams 543

17.1 Introduction 544

17.2 Data Hierarchy 544

17.3 Files and Streams 546

17.4 Classes File and Directory 547

17.5 Creating a Sequential-Access Text File 556

17.6 Reading Data from a Sequential-Access Text File 565

17.7 Case Study: Credit Inquiry Program 569

17.8 Serialization 575

17.9 Creating a Sequential-Access File Using Object Serialization 576

17.10 Reading and Deserializing Data from a Binary File 580

17.11 Wrap-Up 582

Chapter 18: Databases and LINQ 584

18.1 Introduction 585

18.2 Relational Databases 586

18.3 A Books Database 587

18.4 LINQ to SQL 590

18.5 Querying a Database with LINQ 591

18.6 Dynamically Binding Query Results 599

18.7 Retrieving Data from Multiple Tables with LINQ 602

18.8 Creating a Master/Detail View Application 608

18.9 Address Book Case Study 613

18.10 Tools and Web Resources 618

18.11 Wrap-Up 619

Chapter 19: Web App Development with ASP.NET 620

19.1 Introduction 621

19.2 Web Basics 622

19.3 Multitier Application Architecture 623

19.4 Your First Web Application 625

19.5 Standard Web Controls: Designing a Form 636

19.6 Validation Controls 641

19.7 Session Tracking 647

19.8 Case Study: Database-Driven ASP.NET Guestbook 657

19.9 Case Study: ASP.NET AJAX 664

19.10 Case Study: Password-Protected Books Database Application 664

19.11 Wrap-Up 664

Chapter 20: Searching and Sorting 666

20.1 Introduction 667

20.2 Searching Algorithms 667

20.3 Sorting Algorithms 677

20.4 Summary of the Efficiency of Searching and Sorting Algorithms 691

20.5 Wrap-Up 691

Chapter 21: Data Structures 692

21.1 Introduction 693

21.2 Simple-Type structs, Boxing and Unboxing 693

21.3 Self-Referential Classes 694

21.4 Linked Lists 695

21.5 Stacks 708

21.6 Queues 712

21.7 Trees 715

21.8 Wrap-Up 728

Chapter 22: Generics 730

22.1 Introduction 731

22.2 Motivation for Generic Methods 732

22.3 Generic-Method Implementation 734

22.4 Type Constraints 737

22.5 Overloading Generic Methods 739

22.6 Generic Classes 740

22.7 Wrap-Up 749

Chapter 23: Collections 751

23.1 Introduction 752

23.2 Collections Overview 752

23.3 Class Array and Enumerators 755

23.4 Nongeneric Collections 758

23.5 Generic Collections 770

23.6 Covariance and Contravariance for Generic Types 776

23.7 Wrap-Up 778

Chapter 24: GUI with Windows Presentation Foundation 780

24.1 Introduction 781

24.2 Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) 781

24.3 XML Basics 783

24.4 Structuring Data 786

24.5 XML Namespaces 791

24.6 Declarative GUI Programming Using XAML 795

24.7 Creating a WPF Application in Visual C# Express 796

24.8 Laying Out Controls 798

24.9 Event Handling 804

24.10 Commands and Common Application Tasks 812

24.11 WPF GUI Customization 816

24.12 Using Styles to Change the Appearance of Controls 817

24.13 Customizing Windows 823

24.14 Defining a Control’s Appearance with Control Templates 826

24.15 Data-Driven GUIs with Data Binding 831

24.16 Wrap-Up 837

24.17 Web Resources 838

Chapter 25: WPF Graphics and Multimedia 839

25.1 Introduction 840

25.2 Controlling Fonts 840

25.3 Basic Shapes 842

25.4 Polygons and Polylines 843

25.5 Brushes 847

25.6 Transforms 853

25.7 WPF Customization: A Television GUI 855

25.8 Animations 864

25.9 (Optional) 3-D Objects and Transforms 867

25.10 Speech Synthesis and Speech Recognition 873

25.11 Wrap-Up 880

Chapter 26: XML and LINQ to XML 881

26.1 Introduction 882

26.2 Document Type Definitions (DTDs) 882

26.3 W3C XML Schema Documents 886

26.4 Extensible Stylesheet Language and XSL Transformations 893

26.5 LINQ to XML: Document Object Model (DOM) 902

26.6 LINQ to XML Class Hierarchy 906

26.7 LINQ to XML: Namespaces and Creating Documents 915

26.8 XSLT with Class XslCompiledTransform 918

26.9 Wrap-Up 920

26.10 Web Resources 920

Chapter 27: Web App Development with ASP.NET: A Deeper Look 921

27.1 Introduction 922

27.2 Case Study: Password-Protected Books Database Application 922

27.3 ASP.NET Ajax 940

27.4 Wrap-Up 947

Chapter 28: Web Services 948

28.1 Introduction 949

28.2 WCF Services Basics 950

28.3 Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) 950

28.4 Representational State Transfer (REST) 951

28.5 JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) 951

28.6 Publishing and Consuming SOAP-Based WCF Web Services 952

28.7 Publishing and Consuming REST-Based XML Web Services 960

28.8 Publishing and Consuming REST-Based JSON Web Services 964

28.9 Blackjack Web Service: Using Session Tracking in a SOAP-Based WCF Web Service 968

28.10 Airline Reservation Web Service: Database Access and Invoking a Service from ASP.NET 982

28.11 Equation Generator: Returning User-Defined Types 986

28.12 Wrap-Up 998

28.13 Deitel Web Services Resource Centers 999

Chapter 29: Silverlight and Rich Internet Applications 1000

29.1 Introduction 1001

29.2 Platform Overview 1001

29.3 Silverlight Runtime and Tools Installation 1002

29.4 Building a Silverlight WeatherViewer Application 1002

29.5 Animations and the FlickrViewer 1016

29.6 Images and Deep Zoom 1025

29.7 Audio and Video 1038

29.8 Wrap-Up 1043

Chapter 30: ATM Case Study, Part 1: Object-Oriented Design with the UML 1044

30.1 Introduction 1045

30.2 Examining the ATM Requirements Document 1045

30.3 Identifying the Classes in the ATM Requirements Document 1053

30.4 Identifying Class Attributes 1060

30.5 Identifying Objects’ States and Activities 1064

30.6 Identifying Class Operations 1068

30.7 Identifying Collaboration Among Objects 1075

30.8 Wrap-Up 1082

Chapter 31: ATM Case Study, Part 2: Implementing an Object-Oriented Design 1087

31.1 Introduction 1088

31.2 Starting to Program the Classes of the ATM System 1088

31.3 Incorporating Inheritance and Polymorphism into the ATM System 1093

31.4 ATM Case Study Implementation 1100

31.5 Wrap-Up 1124

Appendix A: Operator Precedence Chart 1127

Appendix B: Simple Types 1129

Appendix C: ASCII Character Set 1131

Appendix D: Number Systems 1132

D.1 Introduction 1133

D.2 Abbreviating Binary Numbers as Octal and Hexadecimal Numbers 1136

D.3 Converting Octal and Hexadecimal Numbers to Binary Numbers 1137

D.4 Converting from Binary, Octal or Hexadecimal to Decimal 1137

D.5 Converting from Decimal to Binary, Octal or Hexadecimal 1138

D.6 Negative Binary Numbers: Two’s Complement Notation 1140

Appendix E: UML 2: Additional Diagram Types 1142

E.1 Introduction 1142

E.2 Additional Diagram Types 1142

Appendix F: Unicode ® 1144

F.1 Introduction 1145

F.2 Unicode Transformation Formats 1146

F.3 Characters and Glyphs 1147

F.4 Advantages/Disadvantages of Unicode 1147

F.5 Using Unicode 1148

F.6 Character Ranges 1150

Appendix G: Using the Visual C# 2010 Debugger 1152

G.1 Introduction 1153

G.2 Breakpoints and the Continue Command 1153

G.3 DataTips and Visualizers 1159

G.4 The Locals and Watch Windows 1160

G.5 Controlling Execution Using the Step Into, Step Over, Step Out and Continue Commands 1163

G.6 Other Debugging Features 1166

Index 1170

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)