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Overview

This significantly revised edition has been carefully designed to meet the needs of readers new to C. The reader moves easily through the fundamentals of C and on to its latest applications by means of a time-tested explanatory tool called dissection, first developed by the authors in 1984. Dissection, a pedagogical method similar to a structured, step-by-step walk-through, explains new programming elements and idioms as they are encountered in working code. Right from the start, the authors introduce the reader to complete programs, and at an early point in the text the reader learns to write functions, an important feature of structured programming.

A new edition of an introduction to C programming by bestselling authors Kelley and Pohl, this book is especially useful for beginning programmers, giving them the opportunity to learn sound structured programming in the powerful C language. "Dissections" and numerous examples are used to clearly explain C making this a perfect tutorial for the reader.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A text for a first course in computer science or programming, treating fundamentals of C and its applications using an explanatory tool called dissection, which explains new programming elements and idioms as they are encountered in working code. Includes chapter summaries and exercises. This third edition is redesigned to meet the needs of readers new to C, and includes new sections on two-dimensional arrays and moving to C++, early coverage of writing functions, and optional C++ exercises. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805331493
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 11/30/1995
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 687
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.26 (h) x 1.12 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Today, the ANSI C programming language is widely used throughout the world in both academia and industry. In many educational institutions it is the language of choice for a first programming course and for a language to be used for computer science instruction. A key reason for this is that C has drifted down the curriculum from more advanced courses to more introductory courses. Further, C comes with many useful libraries, and is supported by sophisticated integrated environments. Improvements in ANSI C remedy a number of deficiencies found in traditional C, such as weak typing rules. These improvements coupled with C's broadened impact as a language of choice for systems, graphics, and databases make it a critical choice in teaching programming and computer science. C by Dissection presents a thorough introduction to the programming process by carefully developing working programs to illuminate key features of the C programming language. Program code is explained in an easytofollow careful manner throughout. The code has been tested on several platforms and is obtainable from the internet site aw.com. The code in C By Dissection can be used with most C systems, including those found in operating systems such as MacOS, MSDOS, OS/2, UNIX, and Windows.

Dissections

This book presents readers with a clear and thorough introduction to the programming process by carefully developing working C programs, using the method of dissection. Dissection is a unique pedagogical tool first developed by the authors in 1984 to illuminate key features of working code. A dissection is similar to a structured walkthrough of the code. Itsintention is to explain to the reader newly encountered programming elements and idioms as found in working code. Programs and functions are explained in an easytofollow stepbystep manner. Key ideas are reinforced throughout by use in different contexts.

No Background Assumed

This book assumes no programming background and can be used by students and first time computer users. Experienced programmers not familiar with C will also benefit from the carefully structured presentation of the C language. For student use, the book is intended as a first course in computer science or programming. It is suitable for a CS1 course or beginning programming course for other disciplines. Each chapter presents a number of carefully explained programs, which lead the student in a holistic manner to everimproving programming skills. Right from the start, the student is introduced to complete programs, and at an early point in the text the student is introduced to writing functions as a major feature of structured programming. The function is to the program as the paragraph is to the essay. Competence in writing functions is the hallmark of the skilled programmer and hence is emphasized. Examples and exercises are plentiful in content and level of difficulty. They allow the instructor to pick assignments appropriate to their audience.

What's New

This third edition of C by Dissection: The Essentials of C Programming incorporates a number of new features and improvements:

  • uptodate ANSI C used throughout such as function prototypes
  • new optional "Moving to C++" sections have been added at the end of each chapter to help with a transition to objectoriented C++
  • early explanation of multifile programs to enable the programmer to write properly modular code and produce and use libraries
  • early explanation of simple recursion to reflect its earlier introduction in beginning computer science courses
  • additional coverage of program correctness and type safety
  • more and better explanation of functions and pointers because these concepts are typically stumbling blocks for the beginner
  • more and better explanation of arrays and pointers
  • new section on twodimensional arrays reflecting C's increasing use by scientists and engineers
  • recursion treated in more depth reflecting C's increasing use by computer scientists for implementing sophisticated algorithms
  • additional exercises, including optional C++ exercises
  • bitwise operators moved to an appendix improving the presentation of mainstream language features
  • less prominence given to the preprocessor, which is in accordance with recent programming methodology ideas

Chapter Features

Each chapter contains the following pedagogical elements:

Dissections. Each chapter has several important example programs. Major elements of these programs are explained by the method of dissection. This stepbystep discussion of new programming ideas helps the reader encountering these ideas for the first time to understand them.

Programming Style and Methodology. Programming style and methodology is stressed throughout. Important concepts such as structured branching statements, nested flow of control, topdown design, and structured programming are presented early in the book. A consistent and proper coding style is adopted from the beginning with careful explanation as to its importance and rationale. The coding style used in the book is one commonly used by working programming professionals in the C community. Because C supports function prototypes and strong type checking, this style is adhered to throughout.

Working Code. Right from the start the student is introduced to full working programs. With the executable code, the student can better understand and appreciate the programming ideas under discussion. Many programs and functions are explained through dissections. Variations on programming ideas are often presented in the exercises.

Common Programming Errors. Many typical programming bugs, along with techniques for avoiding them, are described. Much of the frustration of learning a programming language is caused by encountering obscure errors. Many books discuss correct code but leave the reader to a trialanderror process for finding out about bugs. This book explains how typical errors in C are made and what must be done to correct them.

System Considerations. C is available on almost any computer and under most operating systems, but there are occasional differences in behavior from one system to another. This book describes such differences. Also, there are differences in behavior between ANSI C and traditional C, and these are described as well. All the programs have been tested, usually in a number of different environments. The book emphasizes writing portable systemindependent code.

Moving to C++. At the end of each chapter is an optional section that describes the programming elements needed to move to C++. Exercises supporting these sections are included as well. For the most part, C is a subset of the C++ programming language, and many students first learn C before going on to C++. The text aids this natural migration. For the reader who wishes a complete mastery of C++ programming, the text is readily paired with C++ for C Programmers, Second Edition by Ira Pohl (The AddisonWesley Publishing Company, Inc., Redwood City, CA, 1994, ISBN 080533159X).

Summary. At the end of each chapter we present a succinct list of points that were covered in the chapter. This list serves as a review for the reader, reinforcing the new ideas that were presented in the chapter. Exercises. The exercises at the end of each chapter test the student's knowledge of the language. Many exercises are intended to be done interactively while reading the text. This encourages selfpaced instruction by the reader. In addition to exercising features of the language, some exercises look at a topic in more detail, and others extend the reader's knowledge to an advanced area of use.

Classroom Usage

This book can be used as a text in a onesemester course that teaches students how to program. Chapters 1 through 10 cover the C programming language through the use of arrays, pointers, and strings. A secondsemester course can be devoted to more advanced data types, file processing, and software engineering as covered in Chapters 11 through 15. In a course designed for students who already have some knowledge of programming, not necessarily in C, the instructor can cover all the topics in the text. This book can also be used as a text in other computer science courses that require the student to use C.

Interactive Environment

This book is written explicitly for an interactive environment. Experimentation via keyboard and screen is encouraged throughout. For PCs, there are many vendors that supply interactive C/C++ systems, including Borland, IBM, Metroworks, Microsoft, and Symantec.

Professional Use

While intended for the beginning programmer, C by Dissection: The Essentials of C Programming is a friendly introduction to the entire language for the experienced programmer as well. In conjunction with A Book on C, Third Edition by Al Kelley and Ira Pohl (The AddisonWesley Publishing Company, Inc., Redwood City, CA, 1995, ISBN 0805316779), the computer professional will gain a comprehensive understanding of the language, including key points concerning its use under MSDOS and UNIX. As a package, the two books offer an integrated treatment of the C programming language and its use that is unavailable elsewhere. Furthermore, in conjunction with C++ for C Programmers, Second Edition by Ira Pohl or ObjectOriented Programming Using C++ by Ira Pohl (The AddisonWesley Publishing Company, Inc., Redwood City, CA, 1993, ISBN 0805353828), the student or professional is also given an integrated treatment of the objectoriented language C++.

ANSI C Standard

The acronym ANSI stands for "American National Standards Institute." This institute is involved in setting standards for many kinds of systems, including programming languages. In particular, ANSI Committee X3J11 is responsible for setting the standard for the programming language C. In the late 1980s, the committee created draft standards for what is known as "ANSI C" or "standard C." By 1990, the committee had finished its work, and the International Standardization Organization (ISO) approved the standard for ANSI C as well. Thus ANSI C, or ANSI/ISO C, is an internationally recognized standard. The ANSI C standard specifies the form of programs written in C and establishes how these programs are to be interpreted. The purpose of the standard is to promote portability, reliability, maintainability, and efficient execution of C language programs on a variety of machines. All major C compilers follow the ANSI C standard.

Acknowledgments

Our special thanks go to Debra Dolsberry, who acted as the chief technical editor for much of the material in this book. Her careful reading of the working code often led to important improvements. In addition, she was largely responsible for using FrameMaker to create PostScript files suitable for typesetting this book. Our special thanks also go to Robert Field, who acted as the technical editor for the first edition. He provided many useful insights on programming practice and methodology.

There are many other people who provided us with helpful suggestions that we wish to thank:

Paul Andersen
Purdue University, Indiana
Murray Baumgarten
University of California, Santa Cruz
Michael Beeson
San Jose State University, San Jose, California
Randolph Bentson
Colorado State University, Ft. Collins
John Berry
Foothill College, California
Jim Bloom
University of California, Berkeley
John Bowie
HewlettPackard Co., Inc., Greeley, Colorado
Skona Brittain
University of California, Santa Barbara
Timothy Budd
University of Arizona, Tucson
Nick Burgoyne
University of California, Santa Cruz
Bill Burke
University of California, Santa Cruz
John Carroll
San Diego State University, California
Paul Carter
University of Central Oklahoma, Oklahoma
Jim Chrislock
Private consultant, Bonny Doon, California
Al Conrad Keck
Telescope, Mauna Kea, Hawaii
Albert Crawford
Southern Illinois University, Carbondale
John de Pillis
University of California, Riverside
Debra Dolsberry
Cottage Consulting, Aptos, California
Jeff Donnelly
University of Illinois, Urbana
Dan Drew
Texas A & M University, College Station
Daniel Edelson
IA Corporation, Emeryville, California
Peter Farkas
Sun Microsystems, Mountain View, California
Robert Field
ParkPlace Systems, Sunnyvale, California
Dick Fritz
AT&T Bell Laboratories, Naperville, Illinois
Rex Gantenbein
University of Wyoming, Laramie
Buz Gaver
SRI International, Augusta, Georgia
Leonard Garrett
Temple University, Philadelphia
Arthur Geis
College of DuPage, Illinois
William Giles
San Jose State University, San Jose, California
Susan Graham
University of California, Berkeley
Jorge Hankamer
University of California, Santa Cruz
Bob Haxo
University of California, Davis
Paul Higbee
University of North Florida, Jacksonville
Rex Hurst
Utah State University, Logan
Mike Johnson
Oregon State University, Corvallis
Keith Jolly
Chabot College, San Leandro, California
Carole Kelley
Cabrillo College, Aptos, California
Stephen Kelley
Harbor High School, Santa Cruz, California
Huseyin Kocak
University of Miami, Florida
Donald Knuth
Stanford University, California
Clifford Layton
Rogers State University
Darrell Long
University of California, Santa Cruz
Dean Long
Sun Microsystems, Mountain View, California
Charlie McDowell
University of California, Santa Cruz
Ann Mitchell
Purdue University, Indiana
William Muellner
Elmhurst College, Elmhurst, Illinois
Jay Munyer
University of California, Santa Cruz
Lawrence Peterson
Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas
Andrew Pleszkun
University of Colorado, Boulder
Joseph Poole
University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland
Tim Poston
Centre for InformationEnhanced Medicine, Singapore
Patrick Powell
San Diego State University, California
Geoffrey Pullum
University of California, Santa Cruz
Peter Rosencrantz
The Santa Cruz Operation, Inc., California
Mike Schoonover
HewlettPackard Co., Inc., Oklahoma
Peter Scott
University of California, Santa Cruz
Alan Shaw
University of Washington, Seattle
Tilly Shaw
University of California, Santa Cruz
Dain Smith
Mt. Hood Community College, Oregon
Matt Stallmann
University of Denver, Colorado
Dennie Van Tassel
University of California, Santa Cruz

In addition, we would like to thank J. Carter Shanklin, Acquisitions Editor, and Dan Joraanstad, Executive Editor, for their enthusiasm, support, and encouragement; and we would like to thank Ray Kanarr, Production Editor, and Christine Kulke, Editorial Assistant, for their careful attention to the production of this book.

Al Kelley, Ira Pohl, University of California, Santa Cruz

0805331492P04062001
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Writing an ANSI C Program 1
Ch. 2 Lexical Elements, Operators, and the C System 47
Ch. 3 Flow of Control 87
Ch. 4 Functions and Structured Programming 137
Ch. 5 Character Processing 191
Ch. 6 The Fundamental Data Types 223
Ch. 7 Enumeration Types and typedef 263
Ch. 8 Functions, Pointers, and Storage Classes 287
Ch. 9 Arrays and Pointers 327
Ch. 10 Strings and Pointers 361
Ch. 11 Recursion 385
Ch. 12 Structures and ADTs 411
Ch. 13 Input/Output and Files 455
Ch. 14 Software Tools 501
Ch. 15 From C to C++ 535
Appendix A The Standard Library 559
Appendix B The Preprocessor 605
Appendix C Bitwise Operators 621
Appendix D ANSI C Compared To Traditional C 643
Appendix E ASCII Character Codes 653
Appendix F Operator Precedence and Associativity 655
Index 657
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Preface

PREFACE:

Today, the ANSI C programming language is widely used throughout the world in both academia and industry. In many educational institutions it is the language of choice for a first programming course and for a language to be used for computer science instruction. A key reason for this is that C has drifted down the curriculum from more advanced courses to more introductory courses. Further, C comes with many useful libraries, and is supported by sophisticated integrated environments. Improvements in ANSI C remedy a number of deficiencies found in traditional C, such as weak typing rules. These improvements coupled with C's broadened impact as a language of choice for systems, graphics, and databases make it a critical choice in teaching programming and computer science. C by Dissection presents a thorough introduction to the programming process by carefully developing working programs to illuminate key features of the C programming language. Program code is explained in an easytofollow careful manner throughout. The code has been tested on several platforms and is obtainable from the internet site aw.com. The code in C By Dissection can be used with most C systems, including those found in operating systems such as MacOS, MSDOS, OS/2, UNIX, and Windows.

Dissections

This book presents readers with a clear and thorough introduction to the programming process by carefully developing working C programs, using the method of dissection. Dissection is a unique pedagogical tool first developed by the authors in 1984 to illuminate key features of working code. A dissection is similar to a structured walkthrough of the code.Itsintention is to explain to the reader newly encountered programming elements and idioms as found in working code. Programs and functions are explained in an easytofollow stepbystep manner. Key ideas are reinforced throughout by use in different contexts.

No Background Assumed

This book assumes no programming background and can be used by students and first time computer users. Experienced programmers not familiar with C will also benefit from the carefully structured presentation of the C language. For student use, the book is intended as a first course in computer science or programming. It is suitable for a CS1 course or beginning programming course for other disciplines. Each chapter presents a number of carefully explained programs, which lead the student in a holistic manner to everimproving programming skills. Right from the start, the student is introduced to complete programs, and at an early point in the text the student is introduced to writing functions as a major feature of structured programming. The function is to the program as the paragraph is to the essay. Competence in writing functions is the hallmark of the skilled programmer and hence is emphasized. Examples and exercises are plentiful in content and level of difficulty. They allow the instructor to pick assignments appropriate to their audience.

What's New

This third edition of C by Dissection: The Essentials of C Programming incorporates a number of new features and improvements:

  • uptodate ANSI C used throughout such as function prototypes
  • new optional "Moving to C++" sections have been added at the end of each chapter to help with a transition to objectoriented C++
  • early explanation of multifile programs to enable the programmer to write properly modular code and produce and use libraries
  • early explanation of simple recursion to reflect its earlier introduction in beginning computer science courses
  • additional coverage of program correctness and type safety
  • more and better explanation of functions and pointers because these concepts are typically stumbling blocks for the beginner
  • more and better explanation of arrays and pointers
  • new section on twodimensional arrays reflecting C's increasing use by scientists and engineers
  • recursion treated in more depth reflecting C's increasing use by computer scientists for implementing sophisticated algorithms
  • additional exercises, including optional C++ exercises
  • bitwise operators moved to an appendix improving the presentation of mainstream language features
  • less prominence given to the preprocessor, which is in accordance with recent programming methodology ideas

Chapter Features

Each chapter contains the following pedagogical elements:

Dissections. Each chapter has several important example programs. Major elements of these programs are explained by the method of dissection. This stepbystep discussion of new programming ideas helps the reader encountering these ideas for the first time to understand them.

Programming Style and Methodology. Programming style and methodology is stressed throughout. Important concepts such as structured branching statements, nested flow of control, topdown design, and structured programming are presented early in the book. A consistent and proper coding style is adopted from the beginning with careful explanation as to its importance and rationale. The coding style used in the book is one commonly used by working programming professionals in the C community. Because C supports function prototypes and strong type checking, this style is adhered to throughout.

Working Code. Right from the start the student is introduced to full working programs. With the executable code, the student can better understand and appreciate the programming ideas under discussion. Many programs and functions are explained through dissections. Variations on programming ideas are often presented in the exercises.

Common Programming Errors. Many typical programming bugs, along with techniques for avoiding them, are described. Much of the frustration of learning a programming language is caused by encountering obscure errors. Many books discuss correct code but leave the reader to a trialanderror process for finding out about bugs. This book explains how typical errors in C are made and what must be done to correct them.

System Considerations. C is available on almost any computer and under most operating systems, but there are occasional differences in behavior from one system to another. This book describes such differences. Also, there are differences in behavior between ANSI C and traditional C, and these are described as well. All the programs have been tested, usually in a number of different environments. The book emphasizes writing portable systemindependent code.

Moving to C++. At the end of each chapter is an optional section that describes the programming elements needed to move to C++. Exercises supporting these sections are included as well. For the most part, C is a subset of the C++ programming language, and many students first learn C before going on to C++. The text aids this natural migration. For the reader who wishes a complete mastery of C++ programming, the text is readily paired with C++ for C Programmers, Second Edition by Ira Pohl (The AddisonWesley Publishing Company, Inc., Redwood City, CA, 1994, ISBN 080533159X).

Summary. At the end of each chapter we present a succinct list of points that were covered in the chapter. This list serves as a review for the reader, reinforcing the new ideas that were presented in the chapter. Exercises. The exercises at the end of each chapter test the student's knowledge of the language. Many exercises are intended to be done interactively while reading the text. This encourages selfpaced instruction by the reader. In addition to exercising features of the language, some exercises look at a topic in more detail, and others extend the reader's knowledge to an advanced area of use.

Classroom Usage

This book can be used as a text in a onesemester course that teaches students how to program. Chapters 1 through 10 cover the C programming language through the use of arrays, pointers, and strings. A secondsemester course can be devoted to more advanced data types, file processing, and software engineering as covered in Chapters 11 through 15. In a course designed for students who already have some knowledge of programming, not necessarily in C, the instructor can cover all the topics in the text. This book can also be used as a text in other computer science courses that require the student to use C.

Interactive Environment

This book is written explicitly for an interactive environment. Experimentation via keyboard and screen is encouraged throughout. For PCs, there are many vendors that supply interactive C/C++ systems, including Borland, IBM, Metroworks, Microsoft, and Symantec.

Professional Use

While intended for the beginning programmer, C by Dissection: The Essentials of C Programming is a friendly introduction to the entire language for the experienced programmer as well. In conjunction with A Book on C, Third Edition by Al Kelley and Ira Pohl (The AddisonWesley Publishing Company, Inc., Redwood City, CA, 1995, ISBN 0805316779), the computer professional will gain a comprehensive understanding of the language, including key points concerning its use under MSDOS and UNIX. As a package, the two books offer an integrated treatment of the C programming language and its use that is unavailable elsewhere. Furthermore, in conjunction with C++ for C Programmers, Second Edition by Ira Pohl or ObjectOriented Programming Using C++ by Ira Pohl (The AddisonWesley Publishing Company, Inc., Redwood City, CA, 1993, ISBN 0805353828), the student or professional is also given an integrated treatment of the objectoriented language C++.

ANSI C Standard

The acronym ANSI stands for "American National Standards Institute." This institute is involved in setting standards for many kinds of systems, including programming languages. In particular, ANSI Committee X3J11 is responsible for setting the standard for the programming language C. In the late 1980s, the committee created draft standards for what is known as "ANSI C" or "standard C." By 1990, the committee had finished its work, and the International Standardization Organization (ISO) approved the standard for ANSI C as well. Thus ANSI C, or ANSI/ISO C, is an internationally recognized standard. The ANSI C standard specifies the form of programs written in C and establishes how these programs are to be interpreted. The purpose of the standard is to promote portability, reliability, maintainability, and efficient execution of C language programs on a variety of machines. All major C compilers follow the ANSI C standard.

Acknowledgments

Our special thanks go to Debra Dolsberry, who acted as the chief technical editor for much of the material in this book. Her careful reading of the working code often led to important improvements. In addition, she was largely responsible for using FrameMaker to create PostScript files suitable for typesetting this book. Our special thanks also go to Robert Field, who acted as the technical editor for the first edition. He provided many useful insights on programming practice and methodology.

There are many other people who provided us with helpful suggestions that we wish to thank:

Paul Andersen
Purdue University, Indiana
Murray Baumgarten
University of California, Santa Cruz
Michael Beeson
San Jose State University, San Jose, California
Randolph Bentson
Colorado State University, Ft. Collins
John Berry
Foothill College, California
Jim Bloom
University of California, Berkeley
John Bowie
HewlettPackard Co., Inc., Greeley, Colorado
Skona Brittain
University of California, Santa Barbara
Timothy Budd
University of Arizona, Tucson
Nick Burgoyne
University of California, Santa Cruz
Bill Burke
University of California, Santa Cruz
John Carroll
San Diego State University, California
Paul Carter
University of Central Oklahoma, Oklahoma
Jim Chrislock
Private consultant, Bonny Doon, California
Al Conrad Keck
Telescope, Mauna Kea, Hawaii
Albert Crawford
Southern Illinois University, Carbondale
John de Pillis
University of California, Riverside
Debra Dolsberry
Cottage Consulting, Aptos, California
Jeff Donnelly
University of Illinois, Urbana
Dan Drew
Texas A & M University, College Station
Daniel Edelson
IA Corporation, Emeryville, California
Peter Farkas
Sun Microsystems, Mountain View, California
Robert Field
ParkPlace Systems, Sunnyvale, California
Dick Fritz
AT&T Bell Laboratories, Naperville, Illinois
Rex Gantenbein
University of Wyoming, Laramie
Buz Gaver
SRI International, Augusta, Georgia
Leonard Garrett
Temple University, Philadelphia
Arthur Geis
College of DuPage, Illinois
William Giles
San Jose State University, San Jose, California
Susan Graham
University of California, Berkeley
Jorge Hankamer
University of California, Santa Cruz
Bob Haxo
University of California, Davis
Paul Higbee
University of North Florida, Jacksonville
Rex Hurst
Utah State University, Logan
Mike Johnson
Oregon State University, Corvallis
Keith Jolly
Chabot College, San Leandro, California
Carole Kelley
Cabrillo College, Aptos, California
Stephen Kelley
Harbor High School, Santa Cruz, California
Huseyin Kocak
University of Miami, Florida
Donald Knuth
Stanford University, California
Clifford Layton
Rogers State University
Darrell Long
University of California, Santa Cruz
Dean Long
Sun Microsystems, Mountain View, California
Charlie McDowell
University of California, Santa Cruz
Ann Mitchell
Purdue University, Indiana
William Muellner
Elmhurst College, Elmhurst, Illinois
Jay Munyer
University of California, Santa Cruz
Lawrence Peterson
Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas
Andrew Pleszkun
University of Colorado, Boulder
Joseph Poole
University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland
Tim Poston
Centre for InformationEnhanced Medicine, Singapore
Patrick Powell
San Diego State University, California
Geoffrey Pullum
University of California, Santa Cruz
Peter Rosencrantz
The Santa Cruz Operation, Inc., California
Mike Schoonover
HewlettPackard Co., Inc., Oklahoma
Peter Scott
University of California, Santa Cruz
Alan Shaw
University of Washington, Seattle
Tilly Shaw
University of California, Santa Cruz
Dain Smith
Mt. Hood Community College, Oregon
Matt Stallmann
University of Denver, Colorado
Dennie Van Tassel
University of California, Santa Cruz

In addition, we would like to thank J. Carter Shanklin, Acquisitions Editor, and Dan Joraanstad, Executive Editor, for their enthusiasm, support, and encouragement; and we would like to thank Ray Kanarr, Production Editor, and Christine Kulke, Editorial Assistant, for their careful attention to the production of this book.

Al Kelley, Ira Pohl, University of California, Santa Cruz

0805331492P04062001
Read More Show Less

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