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C. S. Lewis Called Him Master
     

C. S. Lewis Called Him Master

5.0 1
by Charles Seper
 
Many readers come to George MacDonald's fantasy literature by way of C.S. Lewis who lauded him as, "my master", or G.K. Chesterton who referred to him as one of the three or four greatest men of the 19th century. However, MacDonald's stories are so complex, so full of twofold meanings, symbolical, metaphorical, and parabolic that many, if not most, readers find

Overview

Many readers come to George MacDonald's fantasy literature by way of C.S. Lewis who lauded him as, "my master", or G.K. Chesterton who referred to him as one of the three or four greatest men of the 19th century. However, MacDonald's stories are so complex, so full of twofold meanings, symbolical, metaphorical, and parabolic that many, if not most, readers find themselves perplexed after first coming upon him. "C.S. Lewis Called Him Master" attempts to explain the obscurity behind many of the passages in MacDonald's only two fantasies written for adults, "Lilith", and "Phantastes", while also providing the reader with a brief, but adequate, examination of George MacDonald's life and work. Also contained therein are several rare photos of the MacDonald family, many of them taken by fellow author and family friend Lewis Carroll. "C.S. Lewis Called Him Master" is an essential biography and study aid for students of George MacDonald's most intense works.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780615149073
Publisher:
Victor, Broadstreet & Johnson Publishing
Publication date:
06/25/2007
Pages:
156
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.36(d)

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C. S. Lewis Called Him Master 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Most of the people who buy this book will most likely have learned of its existence through the author's excellent website: The George MacDonald Information Web. I enjoyed this book from start to finish. It's one of the few on the subject of George MacDonald that reads from a mystical perspective. I already knew quite a lot about the life of MacDonald, but Seper has managed to connect the dots in ways that no one else has. This is true even when speaking of MacDonald's friends, fellow authors, and admirers who followed him such as CS Lewis. Seper gives us a lot of insight as to where MacDonald influenced people and where he drew influence from. His interpretations of 'Lilith' and 'Phantastes' are nothing short of illuminating. But what I liked best of all is his prose. He's very simply a first rate writer who will make you think and feel things you hadn't before in every line he writes such as this paragraph from the chapter on 'Lilith': 'The mysticism of Mr. Vane, and the only mysticism George MacDonald will allow for in the life of a Christian, is one that comes with a large dose of self restraint. 'I wait asleep or awake, I wait', he says. The kind of spiritual adventure that occurred in the life of Mr. Vane should not be expected by all Christians. Nor should those who undergo such an experience be thought of as more blessed than others. MacDonald might also have added the refrain, 'Blessed are those who have not seen and yet believed'. Among the central attainments that Mr. Vane took from his explorations were patience, self restraint, and forbearance¿the very things he least expected to come away with when he started his journey. If hell is getting what you want until you're sick of it, as C.S. Lewis once suggested, perhaps heaven, at least in some measure, is getting what you least expect.' One of the claims made on the book's back cover by Mr. Seper is that the reader will find several rare photographs of, or related to, MacDonald, and he doesn't disappoint! Not only in the book, but on the website as well, will you be able to see many photos which I know I have never come across before, and I'm a huge fan of George MacDonald. Seper even managed to track down photos of the SS Malta which carried GMD to America during his 1872-73 lecture tour. There are several photos of the MacDonald family by fellow writer Lewis Carroll which have to the best of my knowledge never been published.