Cakes and Ale

Cakes and Ale

5.0 2
by W. Somerset Maugham
     
 

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Cakes and Ale is a delicious satire of London literary society between the Wars. Social climber Alroy Kear is flattered when he is selected by Edward Driffield's wife to pen the official biography of her lionized novelist husband, and determined to write a bestseller. But then Kear discovers the great novelist's voluptuous muse (and unlikely first wife),

Overview

Cakes and Ale is a delicious satire of London literary society between the Wars. Social climber Alroy Kear is flattered when he is selected by Edward Driffield's wife to pen the official biography of her lionized novelist husband, and determined to write a bestseller. But then Kear discovers the great novelist's voluptuous muse (and unlikely first wife), Rosie. The lively, loving heroine once gave Driffield enough material to last a lifetime, but now her memory casts an embarrissing shadow over his career and respectable image.  Wise, witty, deeply satisfying, Cakes and Ale is Maugham at his best.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"[Maugham] is a master for creating the appetite for information, of withholding it until the right moment, and then providing it surprisingly."  —Evelyn Waugh

"Maugham is a catty delight." —The Boston Globe

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375725029
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
12/28/2000
Series:
Vintage International Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
209,059
Product dimensions:
5.19(w) x 7.99(h) x 0.70(d)

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Evelyn Waugh
He's a master for creating the appetite for information, of withholding it until the right moment, and then providing it surprisingly.

Meet the Author

W. Somerset Maugham lived in France and England. He died in 1965.

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Cakes and Ale 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
DrSaunders More than 1 year ago
With satire and wit, Maugham tells us of types of digressions in novels that most bore him, and then proceeds to do exactly that which purportedly disturbs him most. A mysterious meeting with a fellow author sets Ashendon on a mental journey through his past acquaintance with the Driffeilds. Far from being the disinterested youth of the casual acquaintance with the great author and his wife we take him to be, Ashendon's knowledge of the couple is deep and multi-layered. He is unable to contribute anything substantial to his friend's upcoming biography, his knowledge of pivotal events far exceeds all others. He says little of Driffield, and we think Driffield to be unaware of the comings and goings of the one closest to him. The suspense builds, and everything we have read until this point is seen from a totally new perspective -- that of our ever-present man on the scene, Ashendon. Not to be missed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago