Calico Joe

( 291 )

Overview

A surprising and moving novel of fathers and sons, forgiveness and redemption, set in the world of Major League Baseball…
 
 
Whatever happened to Calico Joe?
 
     It began quietly enough with a pulled hamstring. The first baseman for the Cubs AAA affiliate in Wichita went down as he rounded third and ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (288) from $1.99   
  • New (17) from $3.16   
  • Used (271) from $1.99   
Calico Joe: A Novel

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$7.99
BN.com price

Overview

A surprising and moving novel of fathers and sons, forgiveness and redemption, set in the world of Major League Baseball…
 
 
Whatever happened to Calico Joe?
 
     It began quietly enough with a pulled hamstring. The first baseman for the Cubs AAA affiliate in Wichita went down as he rounded third and headed for home. The next day, Jim Hickman, the first baseman for the Cubs, injured his back. The team suddenly needed someone to play first, so they reached down to their AA club in Midland, Texas, and called up a twenty-one-year-old named Joe Castle. He was the hottest player in AA and creating a buzz.
 
In the summer of 1973 Joe Castle was the boy wonder of baseball, the greatest rookie anyone had ever seen.  The kid from Calico Rock, Arkansas dazzled Cub fans as he hit home run after home run, politely tipping his hat to the crowd as he shattered all rookie records.
 
Calico Joe quickly became the idol of every baseball fan in America, including Paul Tracey, the young son of a hard-partying and hard-throwing Mets pitcher. On the day that Warren Tracey finally faced Calico Joe, Paul was in the stands, rooting for his idol but also for his Dad. Then Warren threw a fastball that would change their lives forever…
 
In John Grisham’s new novel the baseball is thrilling, but it’s what happens off the field that makes CALICO JOE a classic.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

It took just one pitch to change the lives of Cub slugger "Calico Joe" Castle and Mets hurler Warren Tracey. The paths of the rookie phenom and the hard-throwing, hard-partying pitcher converged in that terrible moment, but it is what they did in the months and years beyond that truly shaped their fate. A John Grisham novel bound to be a Father's Day gift.

Sessalee Hensley

Kirkus Reviews
Only one player in Major League Baseball history has been hit and killed by a pitch, but bean balls—balls thrown near the head—have ended careers. Grisham's (The Litigators, 2011, etc.) novel imagines the act and its consequences. It's 1973, another magic baseball season. The National League East has six teams contending, among them the traditionally hapless Chicago Cubs, soon jinxed once again when its first baseman is injured. Now the Cubs must add a minor leaguer to the roster. That's Joe Castle, a kid from Calico Rock, Ark. Calico Joe immediately begins to set rookie records, leading the Cubs to the top of the standings. Watching from New York is Paul Tracey, a baseball fan as avid as only an 11-year-old boy can be. In fact, Paul's father pitches for the New York Mets, but Warren Tracey, "accustomed to getting whatever he wanted," is a jerk. Warren is a journeyman pitcher, solid in an occasional game, kicked around from one team to another, never an All Star. Warren also abuses his family, drinks and chases women. The novel unfolds from Paul's adult perspective, with flashbacks. The crucial plot point comes in a flashback when Calico Joe, putting up "mind-boggling" numbers over 38 games, meets Warren in Shea Stadium and hits a home run. During his next at bat, as part of some unwritten "code," Warren goes head-hunting and beans the young player. Calico Joe's career is over, and he drifts home to Calico Rock, partially paralyzed, speech impeded, to work as a groundskeeper rather than earning a plaque in baseball's Hall of Fame. Decades later, long estranged from his father, Paul learns that Warren is dying of pancreatic cancer, and he decides to force his father to confront what he did to Joe Castle. Interestingly, the novel's most fully formed character is Warren, and while the narrative and settings are solid, the story drifts toward a somewhat unsatisfying, perhaps too easy, conclusion. A reconciliation story, Hallmark style.
Steven V. Roberts
John Grisham's legal thrillers are dense and hefty, full of twists and turns and tension. His latest novel, Calico Joe, is not like that at all. It's a sweet, simple story, a fable really. And like all fables, it has a moral: Good can come out of evil; it's never too late to confess your sins and seek forgiveness…if you believe in redemption—and who doesn't—you won't be disappointed. Grisham knows baseball as well as he knows crime.
—The Washington Post
From the Publisher
Praise for Calico Joe
 
“Grisham knocks it out of the park.”—The Washington Post
 
“An enjoyable, heartwarming read that’s not just for baseball fans.”—USA Today
 
Praise for John Grisham
 
“Never let it be said this man doesn’t know how to spin a good yarn.”—Entertainment Weekly
 
“Grisham may well be the best American storyteller writing today.”—The Philadelphia Inquirer
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385536073
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 4/10/2012
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 173,777
  • Lexile: 900L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.82 (w) x 8.22 (h) x 0.88 (d)

Meet the Author

JOHN GRISHAM is the author of twenty-four novels, one work of nonfiction, a collection of stories, and two novels for young readers. He lives in Virginia and Mississippi.

Biography

As a young boy in Arkansas, John Grisham dreamed of being a baseball player. Fortunately for his millions of fans, that career didn't pan out. His family moved to Mississippi in 1967, where Grisham eventually received a law degree from Ole Miss and established a practice in Southaven for criminal and civil law. In 1983, Grisham was elected to the Mississippi House of Representatives, where he served until 1990.

While working as an attorney, Grisham witnessed emotional testimony from the case of a young girl's rape. Naturally inquisitive, Grisham's mind started to wander: what if the terrible crime yielded an equally terrible revenge? These questions of right and wrong were the subject of his first novel, A Time to Kill (1988), written in the stolen moments before and between court appearances. The book wasn't widely distributed, but his next title would be the one to bring him to the national spotlight. The day after he finished A Time to Kill, Grisham began work on The Firm (1991), the story of a whiz kid attorney who joins a crooked law firm. The book was an instant hit, spent 47 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list, and was made into a movie starring Tom Cruise.

With the success of The Firm, Grisham resigned from the Mississippi House of Representatives to focus exclusively on his writing. What followed was a string of bestselling legal thrillers that demonstrated the author's uncanny ability to capture the unique drama of the courtroom. Several of his novels were turned into blockbuster movies.

In 1996, Grisham returned to his law practice for one last case, honoring a promise he had made before his retirement. He represented the family of a railroad worker who was killed on the job, the case went to trial, and Grisham won the largest verdict of his career when the family was awarded more than $650,000.

Although he is best known for his legal thrillers, Grisham has ventured outside the genre with several well-received novels (A Painted House, Bleachers, et al) and an earnest and compelling nonfiction account of small-town justice gone terribly wrong (The Innocent Man). The popularity of these stand-alones proves that Grisham is no mere one-trick pony but a gifted writer with real "legs."

Good To Know

A prolific writer, it takes Grisham an average of six months to complete a novel.

Grisham has the right to approve or reject whoever is cast in movies based on his books. He has even written two screenplays himself: Mickey and The Gingerbread Man.

Baseball is one of Grisham's great loves. He serves as the local Little League commissioner and has six baseball diamonds on his property, where he hosts games.

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      Oxford, Mississippi, and Albemarle County, Virginia
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 8, 1955
    2. Place of Birth:
      Jonesboro, Arkansas
    1. Education:
      B.S., Mississippi State, 1977; J.D., University of Mississippi, 1981
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 291 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(118)

4 Star

(74)

3 Star

(50)

2 Star

(29)

1 Star

(20)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 291 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 13, 2012

    With this piece of work he does manage to touch on

    With this piece of work he does manage to touch on your inner child, fantasizing of playing with greats as a child, on your favorite team. With this there is that splash of drama, wishing the book jacket is wrong and maybe things don’t turn out the way the inevitably seem to be heading.
    I love Grisham novels. (As an Ole Miss Alum I love how he always finds a way to put us in there). While this is a rather short piece (142 pages on Nook) it is a nice light read. Spring is here and with the air becoming crisp, this is a perfect lazy Sunday Morning/Afternoon read. Go to the park open the first page and be home in time to start dinner.
    If you are looking for something short a sweet to pass some time, I would recommend this book. If you want a heart stopping drama you may want to look elsewhere.

    25 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2012

    Great story!!!!!!!!!!

    Great story!!!!!!!!!!

    11 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2012

    Disappointed

    I like Grisham novels but i was disappointed at how short this story was. I am a life long Cubs fan and the story nicely captured the enthusiasm and dedication of Cubs fans and revived old memories of Cubs baseball. Memories of a very different baseball era than todays baseball. A very poignant story.
    At only 142 pages, $12+ is a little steep for the ebook.

    8 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2012

    Great Story

    As a died in the wool Cubs fan and former resident of a Chicago suburb, this book spoke to me in a way that may not be the same for others. I could see my Dad & I standing in line to buy tickets to games and hear the cheers of the crowd. Yet this book wasn't just about baseball but about people, relationships and some of the unrecognized challenges of life. I loved this book.

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 21, 2012

    Calico Joe by John Grisham is worth more than $15.00. Thi

    Calico Joe by John Grisham is worth more than $15.00. This is one of the best books I have ever read. It connects family with America’s favorite past time, baseball. It is a story of heartache and pain but also redemption. John Grisham message in the book is to live life to the fullest and to live everyday like it’s your last. Also, Grisham brings out the point to not have any regrets throughout your life.
    The main character, Paul Tracey, is that typical boy who played little league and wants to become a major league player. Grisham does an exceptional job of connecting baseball with boyhood idols. This story is very relatable to many kids and adults. Reading this I had mixed emotions. Paul’s dad Warren (New York Mets pitcher) is the character you hate in the beginning of the book and have a love-hate feeling by the end. The title of the book, Calico Joe, comes from a character in the book Joe Castle. Joe is from a small town in Arkansas called Calico Rock. In his first game he sets many records. The game where Warren Tracey faces Paul Tracey’s hero Joe Castle is when the story gets really good.
    The beginning starts out slow but once you hit the game part, I didn’t want to put the book down! I easily could have read the book in three days. The only negative I have about the book is it changes point of view constantly. It starts when Paul is 11 then shifts to Joe Castle’s story and then switches to Joe Castle in his thirty’s. In the beginning it can be confusing but after the first chapter or so, it is easy to follow. I would also not recommend this book to people who don’t enjoy baseball because everything in the story relates back to it.
    This book connects to kids and adults. I told my grandfather how much I loved it and now he wants to read it because he likes Grisham’s books! This book changed my outlook on life. I felt the heartache and regrets Warren went through. A must read for baseball fans!!!!!!

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2012

    Baseball fans ideal read

    This is a great book about baseball & a son's courage to help a failure of a father find pride & redemption for the first time in his pathetic life

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2012

    Familiarity with top names in 1970's baseball helps considerably

    Familiarity with top names in 1970's baseball helps considerably in the enjoyment of this story. You don't have to go too deep into the roster, but if you don't know who Rick Monday is you probably won't make it to the 7th inning stretch of this book. If you stick with it to the end you'll be rewarded with a nice, comfortable win. No bottom of the 9th, down by 3, 2-out, full count, bases loaded drama. But an enjoyable Sunday afternoon anyway.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2012

    I have purchased every book by John Grisham. This was the worst

    I have purchased every book by John Grisham. This was the worst, not sure I would recommend this to anyone. I thought he was my favorite author, not now.

    4 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2012

    You gotta love baseball!

    Could not finish this book. So much accounting of play after play I just couldn't stay wth it after about 45 pages. Do not recommend unless you are way into the game ad history of bseball.

    4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2012

    Terrebad

    It was terrebadly horible

    4 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2012

    Great Baseball Story

    John Grisham is so good at telling a gripper of a story. I'm a baseball fan and I knew Tony Kubek from high school. You will think it is a true story ,but so tragic in the circumstances of the lives of the main charactures. Kind of liked to have seen Joe play for real. Short but sweet. If you liked Playing For Pizza you'll love this book too. Thanks Mr. Grisham

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2012

    Great read!

    A story of the past and the present woven with heartache, pain and yes, redemption. Easily read in one sitting.
    Such an emotional journey, such a fitting ending.
    I love the game of baseball and have enjoyed reading John Grisham's books for years. Nice to have the two combined!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2012

    Loved it!!!

    Well-written and has emotion in it for anyone....great story...quick read

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2012

    Boring

    Save your money..... unless you like to read never ending baseball statistics!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 4, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Grisham is always good, but I'm not into baseball, so it didn't

    Grisham is always good, but I'm not into baseball, so it didn't seem as good as most of his books.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2012

    Another great Grisham story. I believe John Grisham is America'

    Another great Grisham story. I believe John Grisham is America's storyteller.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2012

    Another Great Story

    A+++

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2012

    Good read!!

    A bit short. But a wonderful story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2012

    Good easy read for any fan of baseball, non fans can enjoy it too. Good morale to the story. Highly recommend.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2012

    Yolo

    Awesome

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 291 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)