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Call Me Athena: Greek Goddess of Wisdom
     

Call Me Athena: Greek Goddess of Wisdom

by Shirin Yim Bridges
 

Athena, Greek Goddess of Wisdom, steps fully formed from her father's head into the already established world of the Olympians. A motherless newcomer, she has to find her own place and purpose. Her adventures bring her down to Earth, where she forms close bonds with the Greek Heroes. Her attachment to three in particular—Diomedes, Odysseus, and

Overview


Athena, Greek Goddess of Wisdom, steps fully formed from her father's head into the already established world of the Olympians. A motherless newcomer, she has to find her own place and purpose. Her adventures bring her down to Earth, where she forms close bonds with the Greek Heroes. Her attachment to three in particular—Diomedes, Odysseus, and Achilles—draws her into the Trojan War. How will she protect her friends and end the conflict? What are the ramifications on Olympus? Where does Athena finally find herself at home—and where can you find her now?

Told by Athena in the first person, this lively book gives young readers a unique entry into the world of Greek mythology and provides interesting cultural and historical context in a nonfiction section illustrated with a family tree of the Olympians, maps, and photographs.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Jeanna Potts
The book is written in the light, airy first person view of Athena as she recounts her life story. Zeus has a severe headache caused by Athena, who is born from his forehead and arrives as a fully-grown woman wearing a complete suit of armor. Her role in the family is to be the goddess of war, wisdom, and crafts. Fifteen minutes after her unusual birth, she meets the other members of her family at the dinner table. She finds herself at the table and discovers she is one of the Twelve Olympians. To her, the family seems aloof and dysfunctional. When her uncle Poseidon wants control over a city on the sea, Athena objects, saying she should have the city instead. Zeus tells settles the argument by informing the two that the people of the city will choose their god or goddess based on a gift Poseidon and Athena are to give the city. Poseidon’s gift is the power of the ocean and horses so they will be undefeatable in war. Athena gives them an olive tree, the symbol of peace that will also provide them with food, medicine, heat, and light. Based on the gifts, the people choose Athena and name their city Athens. Athena often visits the mortals and teaches the women to weave beautiful tapestries. She guides the people in creating inventions that improve their lives. She eventually moves to her temple in Athens and lives there alone. In battles, she assists the Greek heroes like Jason, Odysseus, Diomedes, and Achilles. The big battle in the story is the story of Paris, Helen, and the Trojan Horse. The gods and goddesses are split, with some supporting Troy and some supporting Sparta. Athena supported Sparta, and the Trojan Horse was her design. After Sparta won the war, Athena returned to live with the gods and goddesses on Mount Olympus. She now understands her family and her role in their lives. She often returns to Earth, travels with the armies, and helps them in battles. Her assistance helped the Romans conquer other people and build the Roman Empire. Although the book does provide an interesting narration of Greek history and Greek mythology that would supplement class study of this material, the teacher or parent needs to be aware that Athena talks blithely about Zeus’s affairs and his many illegitimate children. Her nonchalant treatment of this subject may make the book unsuitable for some groups. The book does not have a table of contents but it does have a “Cast of Main Characters” which lists the roles of the gods, goddesses, and heroes presented in the story. At the end of the story, many pages of background information are included. There are details about the ancient Greeks, the Greek gods and goddesses, the Twelve Olympians, what the characters ate and wore, and Athens. A chart outlines the traditional Greek mythology, as well as the facts and fictional details the author added to the story. A glossary and bibliography are also included. Reviewer: Jeanna Potts; Ages 9 to 13.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781937463946
Publisher:
Goosebottom Books
Publication date:
09/02/2014
Series:
Treasury of Glorious Goddesses Series
Pages:
160
Sales rank:
1,346,729
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.60(h) x 0.70(d)
Lexile:
820L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 13 Years

Meet the Author


Shirin Yim Bridges' first book Ruby's Wish was a Publishers Weekly Best Children’s Book and won the Ezra Jack Keats Award. Now in its 11th edition, it is on several state reading lists and has been translated into seven languages. The Umbrella Queen made Time/CNN’s Top 10 Lists and was named a Best Children’s Book by the Bank Street College of Education. Horrible Hauntings made it onto the IRA/CBC Children's Choices List, and Mary Wrightly So Politely launched in April 2013 to starred reviews from Kirkus, Publishers Weekly, and Shelf Awareness. Bridges lives in Foster City, CA.

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