Call Me Gorgeous!

Call Me Gorgeous!

by Giles Milton, Alexandra Milton
     
 
What kind of animal has a porcupine’s spines and a crocodile’s teeth; a flamingo’s neck and a toucan’s beak; a chameleon’s tail and a rooster’s feet? Has such a strange thing ever been seen?

Fun and unique—like the fabulous beast it conjures up—Call Me Gorgeous! celebrates

diversity and the beautiful

Overview

What kind of animal has a porcupine’s spines and a crocodile’s teeth; a flamingo’s neck and a toucan’s beak; a chameleon’s tail and a rooster’s feet? Has such a strange thing ever been seen?

Fun and unique—like the fabulous beast it conjures up—Call Me Gorgeous! celebrates

diversity and the beautiful differences between all creatures. Its spectacular collage illustrations and humorous text will have kids laughing and guessing all the way through.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A Franken-animal gradually offers a self-portrait by describing each of its striking physical characteristics, which are borrowed from recognizable animals. Next to each line of text (“I've got reindeer antlers”) are beguiling textural close-ups of each feature, created with colored pencil and lush handmade papers. The animal's pig's ears are wispy and fibrous, and a “flamingo's neck,” in marbled pinks and oranges, resembles luridly vibrant cotton candy. Additionally, the creature has a porcupine's spines, the beak of a toucan, and charcoal bat wings. The Miltons, a husband-and-wife team, don't have a surprise ending in store in their debut children's book. What you see is what you get, and in this case, it's a “reinde-piggy-porcu-croco-touca-flami-roos-dalma-chameleo-bat-frog,” a tongue-twister that will have kids in stitches. The enthusiastic hybrid creature, finally seen in full on the final page, delivers the closing quip, “But you can call me gorgeous!” After all the suspense, the sum of its parts might not be as dramatic as some might have hoped, but this unique book is as fun and brassy as it is visually striking. Ages 3–6. (Nov.)
School Library Journal
PreS—A mystery animal describes its many characteristics ("I've got reindeer antlers and the ears of a pig"), leading up to the big reveal: "I'm a reinde-piggy-porcu-croco-touca-flami-roos-dalma-chameleo-bat-frog. But...you can call me GORGEOUS!" The book is visually rich but lacking in substance. The clues do not lead to a solvable mystery, since the animal is a fantasy creature of borrowed body parts, and to call the result "gorgeous" is a bit of a stretch. The story makes no statement about beauty being in the eye of the beholder or about valuing uniqueness; it is simply an exercise in fantasy. The large format, thick creamy paper, and highly textured illustrations featuring close-ups of the various animal body parts are indeed gorgeous. Full-body illustrations of the named animals decorate the endpapers, providing context, though some creatures are obscured by the dust jacket. While a first look at the book is visually arresting, the weak story will not hold up to repeated readings.—Heidi Estrin, Feldman Children's Library at Congregation B'nai Israel, Boca Raton, FL
Kirkus Reviews
The creature that inhabits these pages (the ending tag line is the title) is gorgeous indeed, and it is displayed in an inventive piece of bookmaking. The text is straightforward: "I've got reindeer antlers / and the ears of a pig," say the first two-page spreads. The text floats on a sea of white space, along with a close-up view of "a flamingo's neck" or "a chameleon's tail." These images, made in torn, cut and shaped handmade papers and color pencils, are dramatic glimpses of the part in question and not always recognizable. The flamingo's neck is an undulating curve of shocking pinks. The "ears of a pig" are exquisite, fuzzy, pale-rose-and-ecru objects with only a hint of either ear-ness or piggy-ness. The porcupine's spines are a dense thicket of inky, gray lines. At the end, the full vision of the "reinde-piggy-porcu-croco-touca-flami-roos-dalma-chameleo-bat-frog" is revealed to be gorgeous indeed. The endpapers hold full images of each of the 11 animals whose parts make up our winged, beaked, antlered and spiny Gorgeous. (Picture book. 5-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781906250713
Publisher:
Boxer Books
Publication date:
08/04/2009
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.10(w) x 11.50(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

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