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Call Someplace Paradise
     

Call Someplace Paradise

3.5 4
by Pat Hartman
 

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Venice, California, is a ghetto/bohemian/affluent beachfront community as well as a state of mind, a place so special that poets write love lyrics to it and sociologists study it. This tribute to Venice makes you wish you had been there and glad that you weren't.
About The Author
The author was always impressed by book jacket bios that listed an

Overview

Venice, California, is a ghetto/bohemian/affluent beachfront community as well as a state of mind, a place so special that poets write love lyrics to it and sociologists study it. This tribute to Venice makes you wish you had been there and glad that you weren't.
About The Author
The author was always impressed by book jacket bios that listed an eclectic assortment of jobs, and consequently went on to do several interesting things for pay. Overtaken in 1978 by the urge to live in a really weird place she moved to Venice, California, and stayed there six years. More recently, she edited and published 25 issues of a well-reviewed zine, Salon: A Journal of Aesthetics.

Editorial Reviews

This tribute to Venice, California will appeal to any who have a special interest in Southern California history and travel: Hartman's chapters cover 197884 and provide intimate firstperson experiences and reflections on the culture and people she encounters in the area. An intriguing, insightful collection of vignettes.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780738820064
Publisher:
Xlibris Corporation
Publication date:
06/01/2000
Pages:
276
Product dimensions:
5.56(w) x 8.54(h) x 0.71(d)

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Call Someplace Paradise 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She moves past him and into another room.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He grips her hips, fu<_>cking her harder.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Pat Hartman is probably the most underrated journalist in America. Her style is eloquent, her vocabulary enormous, and her razor-sharp wit carves startling insights out of ordinary events. There is nothing ordinary, however, about this chronicle of six years in Venice Beach. This book is a time capsule spanning America's transition from unchecked freedom to ugly conservatism. If you're looking for character studies for a novel, you'll find hundreds of them: transgender rollerskaters, cutthroat comedians, heartbreakingly homeless bag ladies, and a spleef of hippies slipping past their prime. Timothy Leary's best (and worst) acid trips pale by comparison. One caveat: Pat Hartman's greatest work is yet to come. This book is full intense bursts of immaculate writing. I can't wait to see her stretch out. Get a first edition of this book so you can tell your kids you were into Pat Hartman *before* she won the Pulitzer (and so you can tell them what the late '70s were like -- since you probably can't remember).
Guest More than 1 year ago
Pat Hartman is probably the most underrated journalist in America. Her style is eloquent, her vocabulary enormous, and her razor-sharp wit carves startling insights out of ordinary events. There is nothing ordinary, however, about this chronicle of six years in Venice Beach. This book is a time capsule spanning America's transition from unchecked freedom to ugly conservatism. If you're looking for character studies for a novel, you'll find hundreds of them: transgender rollerskaters, cutthroat comedians, heartbreakingly homeless bag ladies, and a spleef of hippies slipping past their prime. Timothy Leary's best (and worst) acid trips pale by comparison. One caveat: Pat Hartman's greatest work is yet to come. This book is full intense bursts of immaculate writing. I can't wait to see her stretch out. Get a first edition of this book so you can tell your kids you were into Pat Hartman *before* she won the Pulitzer (and so you can tell them what the late '70s were like -- since you probably can't remember).