The Cambridge Companion to Orthodox Christian Theology

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Overview

Orthodox Christian theology is often presented as the direct inheritor of the doctrine and tradition of the early Church. But continuity with the past is only part of the truth; it would be false to conclude that the eastern section of the Christian Church is in any way static. Orthodoxy, building on its patristic foundations, has blossomed in the modern period. This volume focuses on the way Orthodox theological tradition is understood and lived today. It explores the Orthodox understanding of what theology is: an expression of the Church's life of prayer, both corporate and personal, from which it can never be separated. Besides discussing aspects of doctrine, the book portrays the main figures, themes and developments that have shaped Orthodox thought. There is particular focus on the Russian and Greek traditions, as well as the dynamic but less well-known Antiochian tradition and the Orthodox presence in the West.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
'This is a remarkable book - as remarkable for the wide scope of its articles as for their quality.' The Messenger

'This book can be read in many ways - as a summary of themes and movements, as a history of theological development, as a devotional meditation, and also as a piece of creative theological thinking in its own right.' Journal of Theological Studies

'… an impressive collection of essays in the long tradition of the Cambridge Companions to Religion. Well worth adding to any library which has collections in this field and, especially the paperback edition, easily accessible for the bookshelves of individual scholars.' Reference Reviews

'This book is truly what it sets out to be: a very useful 'companion' to Orthodox studies … It is refreshing and uncommon to see a useful and important resource on Orthodox Christian theology edited by two Western Orthodox women scholars; Cambridge University Press should be congratulated for entrusting the task to their competent hands.' Theology

'This book is an excellent resource for anyone interested in the contemporary situation of Orthodox life and theology today.' The Expository Times

' … this is an accessible and attractive collection, from which much can be learned.' The Journal of Church History

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Mary Cunningham is a Lecturer in Theology at the University of Nottingham. Her publications include Faith in the Byzantine World (2002).

Elizabeth Theokritoff is an independent scholar and translator, with particular interests in liturgical theology and theology of creation. She has lectured and led workshops widely and published numerous articles.

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Table of Contents

Part I. Doctrine and Tradition: 1. Who are the Orthodox Christians? A historical introduction Mary Cunningham and Elizabeth Theokritoff; 2. Scripture and tradition in the Church Theodore G. Stylianopoulos; 3. Biblical interpretation in worship Archimandrite Ephrem Lash; 4. God in Trinity Boris Bobrinskoy; 5. Creator and creation Elizabeth Theokritoff; 6. Christ and salvation Peter Bouteneff; 7. Eschatology Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev; 8. The Church Matthew Steenberg; 9. Theology of the icon Mariamna Fortounatto and Mary Cunningham; 10. The human person as image and likeness of God Nonna Verna Harrison; 11. The spiritual way John Chryssavgis; Part II. Contemporary Orthodox Theology: Its Formation and Character: 12. Church Fathers and the shaping of orthodox theology Augustine Casiday; 13. The patristic revival and its protagonists Andrew Louth; 14. The Russian religious revival and its theological legacy Michael Plekon; 15. Some key themes and figures in Greek theological thought Athanasios N. Papathanasiou; 16. Personhood and its exponents in twentieth-century orthodox theology Aristotle Papanikolaou; 17. The witness of the church in a pluralistic world: theological renaissance in the Church of Antioch Nicolas Abou Mrad; 18. Russian theology after totalitarianism Leonid Kishkovsky; 19. Orthodox Christianity in the West: the ecumenical challenge John Jillions.
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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2014

    Doomsday Chronicle

    This is the stuff that sensational reality show type documentaries are made of. The basic disaster scenario the author is peddling is a polar shift, of the type of continents suddenly shifting tens of degrees, killing many species in a blink. Granted, most geophysicists are suggesting a magnetic field reversal in the next few centuries, caused either by repolarization of the geomagnetic field, or by migration of the magnetic poles; the rapid crustal shift model would result in an immense transfer of rotational energy by various forms of friction and hysteresis, causing oceans to heat up and even boil in places. This sort of thing has not happened in the past, much less every 10,000 years or so.

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    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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