The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Amateur Astronomy

The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Amateur Astronomy

by Michael E. Bakich
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521812984

ISBN-13: 9780521812986

Pub. Date: 03/01/2003

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

This complete reference provides a wealth of practical information covering all aspects of amateur astronomy. Organized thematically for ease of use, it covers observing techniques, telescopes and observatories, internet resources, and the objects that can be studied. Those new to the field will find tips, techniques and plans on how to begin their quest, and more

Overview

This complete reference provides a wealth of practical information covering all aspects of amateur astronomy. Organized thematically for ease of use, it covers observing techniques, telescopes and observatories, internet resources, and the objects that can be studied. Those new to the field will find tips, techniques and plans on how to begin their quest, and more advanced observers will find useful advice on how to get more from their hobby. Michael E. Bakich obtained a bachelors degree in Astronomy from Ohio State University and a masters degree in Planetarium Education from Michigan State University. He has written numerous original planetarium programs, and gives lectures on astronomy to groups of all ages. He is also a tour guide to eclipses and astro-archaeological sites. Bakich has written two previous books: The Cambridge Planetary Handbook (2000) and The Cambridge Guide to the Constellations (1995), both published by Cambridge University Press.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521812986
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
03/01/2003
Pages:
342
Product dimensions:
8.62(w) x 10.87(h) x 1.10(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction by Jeff Medkeff; Part I. Background: 1. The cosmic backdrop; 2. Positional astronomy; 3. Time and the calendar; 4. The magnitude system; Part II. Equipment: 5. Telescopes; 6. Mounts and drives; 7. Eyepieces; 8. Filters; 9. Telescope accessories; 10. Binoculars; Part III. How to Observe: 11. Sketching what you observe; 12. Astrophotography; 13. Digital and video cameras; 14. The CCD; 15. Photometry; 16. Spectroscopy; Part IV. References and Other: 17. Books and atlases; 18. Catalogues of the deep sky; 19. Software; 20. Observatories; 21. The social astronomer; 22. Light pollution; Part V. What to Observe: 23. Nightfall; 24. The Sun; 25. The Aurora; 26. The Moon; 27. Eclipses and transits; 28. Mercury and Venus; 29. Mars; 30. Jupiter; 31. Saturn; 32. The outer planets; 33. Asteroids; 34. Comets; 35. Meteors and meteor showers; Part VI. Deep Sky Objects: 36. Double stars; 37. Variable stars; 38. Supernovae; 39. Occultations; 40. Nebulae; 41. Star clusters; 42. Galaxies; Part VII. Observing Tips.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >