The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Evolution / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $9.30
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 95%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (15) from $9.30   
  • New (1) from $272.54   
  • Used (14) from $9.30   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$272.54
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(205)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Hardcover New 0521323703 New Condition ~~~ Right off the Shelf-BUY NOW & INCREASE IN KNOWLEDGE...

Ships from: Geneva, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

This is a new and refreshing introduction to the human species that places modern humans squarely in evolutionary perspective and treats evolution itself as a continuing genetic process in which every one of us is involved. Over seventy scholars worldwide have collaborated on the Encyclopedia, which is divided into ten main sections. Following a keynote introduction asking simply What makes us human?, the coverage ranges widely: from genetics, primatology and fossil origins to human biology and ecology, brain function and behavior, and demography and disease. Emphasis is placed throughout on the biological diversity of modern people and the increasing convergence of the fossil and genetic evidence for human evolution that has emerged in recent years. Because of the need to look at humankind in the context of our closest relatives, the Encyclopedia also pays particular attention to the evolution and ecology of the living primates--lemurs, lorises, monkeys and apes. It deals with the evolution and ecology of human society, as reconstructed from archaeological remains, and from studies of indigenous peoples and living primates today. It considers the biology of uniquely human abilities such as language and upright walking, and it reviews the biological future of humankind in the face of challenges greater than those ever before experienced. Boxes highlighting key issues and techniques are provided throughout the text, and there are numerous maps, photographs, diagrams, and ready-reference tables--all the reader needs in a single volume to acquire a comprehensive knowledge of how humankind has developed and how scientists set about investigating the origin of our species.

Appropriate for: Clinical Geneticists.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
What makes us human? The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Evolution draws on the expertise of more than 70 scholars to answer this question, placing modern humans in evolutionary perspective. Divided into 10 parts, such as patterns of primate evolution, the primate fossil record, and early human behavior and ecology, this book resembles a textbook more than an encyclopedia. Each part is further subdivided into such topics as classification of primates, evolution of apes, and how bones reveal diet.

Articles average three to five pages in length and include a variety of black-and-white photographs, graphs, and drawings. Each article is signed by a leading academic in the field. "See" references are used at the end of each article to connect related articles within the volume; however, no references exist to outside sources or primary literature. The volume also provides three appendixes: select biographical information on historical figures, a geologic time scale, and a world map of relevant research sites. The encyclopedia ends with a useful glossary, an excellent list of further readings, and a detailed index.

Many library reference collections will already include Milner's Encyclopedia of Evolution [RBB Ja 1 91] and The Encyclopedia of Human Evolution and Prehistory, edited by Tattersall [RBB Fe 1 89]. Both these volumes approach the topic of human evolution with brief articles presented in alphabetical order. They provide quicker access and often unique information on such concepts as aggregation dispersal or on methodology, such as cladistics.

In contrast, The Cambridge Encyclopedia covers human ecology through broad topical articles. Topically, this new encyclopedia seems stronger on most behavior issues and provides more extensive attention to the evolution and ecology of relevant living primates, such as lemurs and monkeys. In addition, it is more up-to-date on such controversies as "Mitochondrial Eve." The academic approach and article length of The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Evolution will appeal most to university and research libraries.

From the Publisher
"This book is unquestionably the best reference work dedicated to human evolution yet published....The stunning computer-generated composite image of human and chimpanzee faces that graces the cover illustrates the unmistakable link between humans and other primates that is emphasized on the pages within....The book resembles and reads like a textbook as much as an encyclopedia....This work is a comprehensive catalog of present knowledge and thus an absolutely essential source for all libraries." Library Journal

"...this Cambridge title offers a wide-ranging introduction to the field...both comprehensive and usable...This work is highly recommended for general and research libraries of all types...The authoritative source material is both readable and accurate within the framework of current data." Laurel Grozinger, American Reference Books Annual

"...succeeds admirably....a fascinating and beautiful introduction to human evolution in its broadest context....a useful reference for anyone interested in the subject." John G. Fleagle, The Quarterly Review of Biology

"In all, this is an essential purchase for any anthropology library." The Times Higher Education Supplement

"If (whether student or professional) you're interested in human evolution, you'll want to have this volume handy." Ian Tattersall, Nature

"...I can think of no more useful guide to the research topics of general human evolution. Individually and collectively the essays are readable and scholarly, and the stylistic presentation is highly professional. At the very least it should be on the required reading list for courses on human evolution, for teachers and students alike." Walter Carl Hartwig, Evolutionary Anthropology

"...a fine book; a worthy addition to the excellent Cambridge Encyclopedia series. Great to have on the shelves." Colin Tudge, New Scientist

"...covers human ecology through broad topical articles. Topically, this new encyclopedia seems stronger on most behavior issues and provides more extensive attention to the evolution and ecology of relevant living primates, such as lemurs and monkeys. In addition, it is more up to date on such controversies as 'Mitochondrial Eve.' The academic approach and article length of The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Evolution will appeal most to university and research libraries." Booklist

"...succeeds in providing truly 'encyclopedic' coverage of the whole gamut of human evolutionary studies....The quality of the writing is, for the most part, excellent, and the editors and contributing authors are to be commended for creating a volume that will be truly useful to a wide range of readers within anthropology, including graduate and undergraduate students as well as professors....I heartily recommend this volume to all anthropologists and university librarians. There is no better single source that I am aware of for finding brief, accurate, and current synopses of the issues, problems, and methods of analysis within the domain of human evolutionary studies." Robert L. Anemone, American Journal of Physical Anthropology

"...a valuable reference book for anyone working in the field of human evolution." Keren R. Rosenberg, American Journal of Human Biology

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780521323703
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication date: 1/28/1992
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 520
  • Product dimensions: 8.46 (w) x 10.98 (h) x 1.46 (d)

Table of Contents

1. Introduction: what makes us human?; 2. Patterns of primate evolution; 3. The life of primates; 4. The brain and language; 5. Primate social organisation; 6. Human evolution in geological context; 7. The primate fossil record; 8. Primate genetics and evolution; 9. Genetic clues of relatedness; 10. Early human behaviour and ecology; 11. Human populations, past and present; 12. Conclusion: the evolutionary future of humankind.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)