Camelot by Caryl Rivers | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Camelot

Camelot

4.0 1
by Caryl Rivers
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

“A mystical valentine to JFK’s media-savvy presidency.” –Publisher’s Weekly

“Rivers manages to include all the elements of the Sixties.” –Library Journal

From the international bestselling author of VIRGINS comes this hilarious take on the sexual politics and high seriousness of the Kennedy years. A young

Overview

“A mystical valentine to JFK’s media-savvy presidency.” –Publisher’s Weekly

“Rivers manages to include all the elements of the Sixties.” –Library Journal

From the international bestselling author of VIRGINS comes this hilarious take on the sexual politics and high seriousness of the Kennedy years. A young White House reporter's evolution from personal ambition to public spirit is brilliantly set against a background of advancing civil rights and the first stirrings of American involvement in Vietnam.

CAMELOT is the story of Mary Springer, an up-and-coming White House reporter from a small Belvedere, MD, paper who is—by the standards of 1963—way ahead of her time. After striking up an acquaintance with President Kennedy when assigned to cover the White House for her paper, Mary's personal and professional lives converge once she becomes involved in a crisis when city planners want to raze a mostly black neighborhood and build luxury apartments. While Martin Luther King Jr. prepares to march on Washington, racial violence erupts in Belvedere and the president tragically goes about his last days. Working beside Jay Broderick, a charismatic photographer, and Don Johnson, a gifted young black man recently returned from the freedom rides to the South, Mary finally connects with the spirit of liberty and egalitarianism that are the legacy of the Camelot years.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A mystical valentine to JFK's media-savvy presidency and a Pollyanna-ish portrait of the early Civil Rights movement serve as backdrops of this melodramatic tale of a self-reliant woman reporter discovering liberated love in conservative Belvedere, Md., in 1963. Mary Springer strikes up an acquaintance with President Kennedy when assigned to cover the White House for her paper, the Belvedere Blade. Crisis looms in her life and the life of the country. While Martin Luther King Jr. prepares to march on Washington, racial violence erupts in Belvedere and the president tragically goes about his last days, Mary is immersed in her own problems: learning to live separated from her alcoholic husband while raising their daughter alone. She also finds herself falling in love with sensitive photographer Jay Broderick, and the two end up dangerously involved with local Civil Rights activists. Former Washington correspondent Rivers (Slick Spins and Fractured Facts: How Cultural Myths Distort the News; Indecent Behavior) takes us into the minds of Jay and Mary, often through rather unfortunate fantasies involving Sigmund Freud and the Nixons. Civil Rights leader Donald Johnson appears in first-person entries from his journal, and the inner musings of JFK himself--including ominous premonitions of his demise--are also woven in. The effort is doomed by superficial characterization, contrived plotting and Rivers's tendency to simplify this dramatic era, the nuances of which have already occupied so many biographers and historians. (Oct.)
Library Journal
Rivers (Indecent Behavior, Dutton, 1990) offers a picture of the early 1960s mainly from the perspectives of two twentysomethings at a small-town newspaper outside Washington, DC. Mary Springer, the paper's White House correspondent, captures President Kennedy's interest and even meets with him. Meanwhile, she falls in love with the paper's photographer, Jay Broderick (she's separated from her alcoholic husband), and together they cover car accidents, White House press conferences, and the decision to demolish a neighborhood of low-income houses. Interspersed with this story are chapters in Kennedy's voice describing his feelings about his family and Vietnam. As if this weren't enough, Rivers also includes Mary's husband's story as well as that of a young black man contemplating a writing career. Rivers manages to include all the elements of the Sixties, but she is so busy setting up the background that she fails to bring her characters to life. She has written better novels in the past; let's hope she'll write better ones in the future. Not recommended.--Nancy Pearl, Washington Ctr. for the Book, Seattle
Kirkus Reviews
A very dated fictional hagiography of the Kennedy era, written by novelist and journalist Rivers (Indecent Behavior, 1990; Slick Spins and Fractured Facts, 1996, etc.) in a tone so reverent that it could turn Arthur Schlesinger's stomach. If you still believe that JFK represented the last best hope for American politics and society, this is the book for you. It describesþthrough allegorical characters worthy of an Eisenstein filmþthe coming together of people, forces, and ideas that resulted in the civil rights movement, women's liberation, and the assassination in Dallas. The story begins in 1963 with girl reporter Mary Springer's introduction to big-league journalism at a White House press conference. Mary works for the Belvedere Blade in backwoods Maryland. Ordinarily, she'd be covering Rotary conventions and supermarket dedications, but on her first trip to the White House she manages to get a question answered by the President and goes on to become his confidante in a small way. An urban renewal project in Belvedere has become the object of black protests, you see, and Kennedy needs someone to tell him the truth about what's happening. Springer and her photographer sidekick Jay Broderick cover the protests, which brings them into contact with Donald Johnson, a black creative-writing student at Georgetown who serves as one of the protest organizers. Johnson, highly educated and urbane, knows he can pass in white society but doesn't feel comfortable putting his roots behind him. Springer (unhappily married as the result of a shotgun wedding) and Broderick (unhappily alcoholic) begin an unhappy affair that ends in tragedy. Johnson becomes more and more militant in hisdemand for justiceþwith tragic results. And JFK himself, whose interior monologues are interpolated throughout the story, comes to a tragic end in Dallas, in case you didn't know. Sophomoric and hackneyed: a formulaic plot inhabited by formulaic characters.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781626810037
Publisher:
Diversion Books
Publication date:
03/12/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
506
Sales rank:
1,001,309
File size:
4 MB

What People are saying about this

Carl Bernstein
In this, as in all her books, Caryl Rivers has shown she's a terrific writer, with a wise, wry take on the 60s generation.

Meet the Author

Caryl Rivers is a nationally known author, journalist, media critic and professor of Journalism at Boston University. She is the author of four novels and four works of non-fiction, all critically acclaimed. Her books have been selections of the Book of the Month Club, Literary Guild, Doubleday Book Club and Troll Book club. Caryl is a distinguished scholar in the areas of gender and media, and has been widely published in the New York Times Magazine,The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe, and Chicago Tribune. As a screenwriter, she has written a number of acclaimed made-for-television films. 

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Camelot 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Murasake More than 1 year ago
I