Camilla d'Errico's Burn
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Camilla d'Errico's Burn

by Camilla d'Errico, Scott Sanders
     
 

Burn was once human.

He also had a family and friends, until a metallic angel of death took everything from him. This mechanical monster, Shoftiel, was one of many living machines made to help humanity that revolted and declared war on their creators. It tore through Burn's home and wreaked havoc on his city until the buildings collapsed, crashing down

Overview

Burn was once human.

He also had a family and friends, until a metallic angel of death took everything from him. This mechanical monster, Shoftiel, was one of many living machines made to help humanity that revolted and declared war on their creators. It tore through Burn's home and wreaked havoc on his city until the buildings collapsed, crashing down upon them.

Emerging from the rubble, Burn and Shoftiel discover their once separate bodies have become one — neither human nor machine, but a freak union of both. Internally their minds are caught in a raging battle for control. Just as mankind must struggle against the sentients for survival, Burn must find the strength to overcome Shoftiel's genocidal programming to retain whatever's left of his humanity.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Michael Jung
Burn was just an ordinary boy when he stumbled into the crossfire between human soldiers and killer robots who declared war on humanity. But when a falling building nearly kills Burn and one of the robots, the damaged robot decides to use Burn's still-living tissue to repair its components—fusing the two into a single being. Now, this composite creature must survive in a war-torn world full of humans who want to destroy the cyborg and robots who want to cleanse their robotic brother of his human "infection." Created and drawn by Italo-Canadian artist Camilla d'Errico, Burn draws from the tradition of Japanese SF anime for teens and adults. As such, the book can be very violent—often showing characters getting ripped to shreds or torn apart by bullets. Other sequences take place within the composite being's mind, showing Burn arguing with the robot Shoftiel for control over their body. Additional characters are inspired by other stock characters in Japanese anime, including the tough-but-cute biker girl Kali who becomes Burn's ally/enemy, and an adorable but nameless little girl with a secret of her own. It is all competently done, with d'Errico's artwork showing a mastery of cinematic storytelling, yet the story itself does not offer anything particularly new to this genre. Reviewer: Michael Jung
VOYA - Timothy Capehart
On a desert world where robots are a part of everyday life, Burn is an everyday tween until Cerebus, the robotic "son" of Dr. Anders Carnegie, decides humans are a disease that needs to be cured. Although Dr. Carnegie tries to talk him out of it, Cerebus sends his robotic minions Puriel and Shoftiel out to slaughter humanity. Shoftiel is nearly destroyed by soldiers while crushing a village, and his self-repairing tendrils find the spare parts for a fix in the still living remains of Burn. The resulting cyborg still tries to follow Cerebus's orders while Burn and Shoftiel are in continuous conflict. With the help of Kali and her speeder-biker teen sidekicks, Burn battles Puriel and others to protect Dr. Carnegie's young daughter Aeya. Canadian artist and comics/manga creator d'Errico collects the first six issues (all there are so far) of her kinda-mecha-manga, which plays out as a nice meditation on man versus machine for the younger set. There are several places where following the rules of the format causes a character to answer a question before it is asked or comment on something that has not yet happened, but it is not pervasive. The mix of ink and scratchy pencil in the black-and-white panels give this book a distinctive, if slightly unfinished, look. It is a good choice for tweens who like a little brainwork with their battles. Reviewer: Timothy Capehart
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up–Artificial intelligences declare war on humans after finding them inefficient and unfit to use robots as labor. After one killing machine uses Burn, a half-dead boy, to partially rebuild itself, the gestalt cyborg organism is also targeted for robotic destruction while simultaneously mistrusted by the human survivors. Burn presents readers with a series of choppy, inchoate scenes rendered in a loose pencil style that increasingly undermines the robotic designs and any tactile solidity of the illustrations. But more unfortunate than the incongruous look of the work is the utter lack of any recognizable human action, interaction, or dialogue. The characters don’t ever act in a believable manner, making the already-difficult scenarios more unrealistic and impossible to connect with on an intellectual or emotional level. It’s disappointing that these classic science-fiction ideas have been given such short shrift in execution.–Benjamin Russell, Belmont High School, NH

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781416978732
Publisher:
Simon Pulse
Publication date:
10/27/2009
Edition description:
Original
Pages:
160
Sales rank:
742,752
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.20(d)
Age Range:
12 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Camilla d'Errico was the illustrator and co-creator of Avril Lavignes' Make 5 Wishes graphic novel. She has been the illustrator on several other comicbook projects including Burn which was published by Arcana Comics in 2008. She lives in Vancouver, BC.

Camilla d'Errico was the illustrator and co-creator of Avril Lavignes' Make 5 Wishes graphic novel. She has been the illustrator on several other comicbook projects including Burn which was published by Arcana Comics in 2008. She lives in Vancouver, BC.

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