Camille and the Sunflowers

Camille and the Sunflowers

5.0 1
by Laurence Anholt
     
 

"Where Camille lived, the sunflowers grew so high they looked like real suns. . .One day a strange man arrived in Camille's town. He had a straw hat and a yellow beard." So begins this fascinating tale of Camille, a little boy who is the son of a small-town postman. Camille meets the man with the yellow beard, and they become friends. This bearded man is a painter

Overview


"Where Camille lived, the sunflowers grew so high they looked like real suns. . .One day a strange man arrived in Camille's town. He had a straw hat and a yellow beard." So begins this fascinating tale of Camille, a little boy who is the son of a small-town postman. Camille meets the man with the yellow beard, and they become friends. This bearded man is a painter named Vincent van Gogh. The story, based on a true-life incident, is beautifully illustrated in full color by the author. This unusual picture storybook will appeal to children who love art-and also to children who simply enjoy a good story.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-In this story that has roots in historical fact, Camille and his postman father meet a stranger who comes to their town with no money and no friends. They give him furniture and friendship, and he paints a picture of each member of their family. The boy visits the man and takes him sunflowers, but the townspeople drive Vincent away because he's too odd and he doesn't have what they consider a real job. This sad tale can stand alone, and, while it omits important details, its tone matches that of other accounts of Van Gogh's short life. Unfortunately, the CIP information, the names and locations of the Roulin family paintings, and a biographical note about Van Gogh are printed inside the book covers under the jacket flaps. The sketchy pen-and-watercolor illustrations are punctuated with seven fine art reproductions, including a little known ``Portrait of Camille Roulin'' and the famous ``Vase with 14 Sunflowers.'' The Roulins and the yellow house in which the artist stayed when he was in Arles, France, are seen in context in Bruce Bernard's Van Gogh (Dorling Kindersley, 1993). The two books complement one another and provide a greater understanding of this gifted, troubled man.-Carolyn Jenks, First Parish Unitarian Church, Portland, ME
Hazel Rochman
Based on a true encounter, this tells the story of a small boy named Camille who befriends the troubled painter Vincent van Gogh when he comes to live in a village in the Dutch countryside. Camille is heartbroken because most of the local people jeer at the artist, who never sells a picture. Some of Anholt's illustrations are based on famous van Gogh scenes (the view of his bedroom, for example); Anholt also includes reproductions of actual paintings, such as van Gogh's "Sunflowers," and portraits of Camille and his family. This book will show children how art transforms ordinary things. Pair it with Nichol's "Beethoven Lives Upstairs" , which is also about a strange, lonely genius who enters a child's daily life.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780812064094
Publisher:
Barron's Educational Series, Incorporated
Publication date:
08/28/1994
Series:
Anholt's Artists Books for Children Series
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
164,629
Product dimensions:
8.43(w) x 10.62(h) x 0.31(d)
Lexile:
AD660L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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Camille and the Sunflowers 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
psycheKK More than 1 year ago
Many people have made much money from Vincent Van Gogh's paintings -- sadly, he was not one of them. This sweet story from an incident in Van Gogh's life both delighted and saddened me. I was delighted to find out that the lonely painter had non-family benefactors and non-painter friends; and I was saddened to find out he was run out of town. Unlike other of Laurence Anholt's artist series books, the pictures in this book have the feeling of Van Gogh's work, but are not illustrated in the style of Van Gogh's work. For a children's book, that is a good thing. Van Gogh's work is not especially pretty, but is incredibly powerful, evocative and complex. I think Laurence Anholt struck exactly the right tone in these illustrations.