Camp-Fires Of A Naturalist

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER II. Old Jim Leatherman's Load—The Storm—Some Experiences with Snakes—About Antelope—Useless Tails and Queer Horns—Fight with a Rattlesnake—How Dyche the Tramps out of Camp. iT was a jolly quartette that rode in old Jim ...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER II. Old Jim Leatherman's Load—The Storm—Some Experiences with Snakes—About Antelope—Useless Tails and Queer Horns—Fight with a Rattlesnake—How Dyche the Tramps out of Camp. iT was a jolly quartette that rode in old Jim Leatherman's wagon over the prairies of western Kansas, on a hot July afternoon, from Buffalo, a little shipping station of the Union Pacific Railroad. A casual observer would have taken the party for a lot of schoolboys out on a frolic, and he would not have been far wrong. The two older boys were the jolliest of all. The younger boys were not quite so demonstrative, yet they, too, were full of animal life and were inspired by the invigorating air of the plains. The old boys called each other Mudge and Snow, while the younger ones were known as Dyche and Dick. At home Mudge and Snow were staid college professors, and Dyche and Dick were students in the institution. While in college circles decorum was duly observed, here on the prairies all four called each other by the most convenient names, and while they are removed from the college atmosphere these names may be sufficient. Old Jim Leatherman found his strange load incomprehensible. Mudge would suddenly break offfrom his rhapsody on the possible skeleton of a plesiosaurus that he expected to find, jump from the wagon, and scurry over the prairie after Snow. Then both would return, triumphant over the capture of some inoffensive insect which the bright eyes of the old boys had detected as they rode along. The day thus passed was short to the travellers. Many trophies of the " bug hunters" had been gathered when the wagon halted by the side of a little stream which wound across the barren plain. A lone cotton- wood tree stood sentinel on the bank as a beacon to the party, and Leatherman...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780554468587
  • Publisher: BiblioBazaar
  • Publication date: 8/21/2008
  • Pages: 344
  • Product dimensions: 9.69 (w) x 7.44 (h) x 0.72 (d)

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CHAPTER II. Old Jim Leatherman's Load—The Storm—Some Experiences with Snakes—About Antelope—Useless Tails and Queer Horns—Fight with a Rattlesnake—How Dyche the Tramps out of Camp. iT was a jolly quartette that rode in old Jim Leatherman's wagon over the prairies of western Kansas, on a hot July afternoon, from Buffalo, a little shipping station of the Union Pacific Railroad. A casual observer would have taken the party for a lot of schoolboys out on a frolic, and he would not have been far wrong. The two older boys were the jolliest of all. The younger boys were not quite so demonstrative, yet they, too, were full of animal life and were inspired by the invigorating air of the plains. The old boys called each other Mudge and Snow, while the younger ones were known as Dyche and Dick. At home Mudge and Snow were staid college professors, and Dyche and Dick were students in the institution. While in college circles decorum was duly observed, here on the prairies all four called each other by the most convenient names, and while they are removed from the college atmosphere these names may be sufficient. Old Jim Leatherman found his strange load incomprehensible. Mudge would suddenly break offfrom his rhapsody on the possible skeleton of a plesiosaurus that he expected to find, jump from the wagon, and scurry over the prairie after Snow. Then both would return, triumphant over the capture of some inoffensive insect which the bright eyes of the old boys had detected as they rode along. The day thus passed was short to the travellers. Many trophies of the " bug hunters" had been gathered when the wagon halted by the side of a little stream which woundacross the barren plain. A lone cotton- wood tree stood sentinel on the bank as a beacon to the party, and Leatherman...
Read More Show Less

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